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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll need a new headlight and possibly a new hood, or lots of structural repair to the hood (wrinkled and out of alignment).

My insurance does not have my dealer, or the dealer's collision center, in their network. The process would be easier if I used one of the insurance companies facilities, because they are adjusters and repairers in one.

Do I HAVE to take it to the dealer to keep maintain the warranty? I called them and they said yes, but I don't know if that's true.

I do all my maintenance there to try to extend my warranty to 200,000 miles (yes, I'll probably have it that long :)). And, I know a lot of people will say I'm crazy for doing that, and that's fine.

I am also concerned if I don't use the dealer, what time of results I'll get. Haven't even had the car for a year.:(
 

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You can have any body shop do the repair.

However, the insurance company and their "preferred" body shop can often streamline things and I'd bet the body shop does good work. They will not have to bother you if the body shop finds damage beyond the original estimate. Generally repairs are guaranteed anyway.

The warranty on the car is a seperate issue, and it sounds like no mechanical damage was done so i would not be too concerned there.

When my wife's 10 month old Elantra got hit, we used the insurance company recommended body shop and the results were excellent, and coincidentally it was the same body shop that the dealer recommended. $4,200 damage and repaired like new in 6 business days.
 

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What did you mean by "I do all my maintenance there to try to extend my warranty to 200,000 miles"??? There is no way to extend the warranty past 100,000 miles/10 years that I am aware of.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, some dealers offer an extension of the warranty to 20yrs/200000 miles if you do your maintenance with the place you purchased the car from.
 

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Do I HAVE to take it to the dealer to keep maintain the warranty? I called them and they said yes, but I don't know if that's true. (
Maybe your dealer assumed you were referring to normal repairs or maintenance as opposed to body work. My '13 suffered a deer collision when not yet 3 months old last year. I took the car to an insurance company recommended body shop that also happened to be a Chevy dealer. My Hyundai dealer never complained. But then, they probably never knew of the damage to begin with.
 

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You have the legal right to choose whatever body shop you want. Insurance companies like to get goodie-goodie with body shops that they in turn call 'preferred'. In exchange for sending them business, the body shops kick back checks to the insurance companies.

Do a little pavement pounding locally and see who the best body shop is before simply doing what your insurance agent wants you to do. If you plan on keeping this car for 200,000 miles, I'm pretty sure you'd rather have the damage fixed right rather than have it done wrong simply for 'a little convenience'.
 

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You have the legal right to choose whatever body shop you want. Insurance companies like to get goodie-goodie with body shops that they in turn call 'preferred'. In exchange for sending them business, the body shops kick back checks to the insurance companies.

Do a little pavement pounding locally and see who the best body shop is before simply doing what your insurance agent wants you to do. If you plan on keeping this car for 200,000 miles, I'm pretty sure you'd rather have the damage fixed right rather than have it done wrong simply for 'a little convenience'.
Every so often, a post comes along that makes complete sense. This is one of those. Some of the best advice I've read this month. :thumbsup:
 

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I used the "other party's" insurance company's "preferred" body shop recently on my Elantra. It just so happens that they were also a "preferred" body shop for my insurance comapany too. I had used them before and was happy with their work. I also checked on-line for recent reviews.

Among the things being replaced, (headlight, bumper, grills, inner fender etc....) they had written the estimate as "straighten" the hood damage. When I picked up the car, I saw on the paperwork that they had replaced the hood. I asked about it. They said they were not happy with the way it would straighten. They just replaced the hood. All parts replaced were genuine Hyundai parts.

No complaints here.
 

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Insurance company "steering" is what it is called, trying to get you to use 1 of their "buddy" shops to save them money..

I did some scamming yrs ago on the subject..
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No Steering!
Don’t believe everything that you hear from an insurer when it is trying to “STEER” you to a repair shop. Don’t be fooled! These phrases and others like them are used to control you through intimidation and fear. Read your policy and always remember, it’s Your Car! Your Choice!

Learn these phrases most often used by insurers to deceive consumers:

“You will have to pay more if you go to the shop of your choice.”

Insurers make this statement to intimidate you. The insurer has to pay to have all accident related repairs completed.

“We won’t warranty the repair if you go there.”

Ask the insurer for a copy of this “warranty” and who will do the re-repairs, remember insurers don’t actually repair anything, so they can’t do warranty repairs.

“If you go to our network shop, we will warranty the repairs for as long as you own the car.”

Insurers don’t repair cars, so how can the company do a warranty repair.

“We can’t give you a rental if you use them.”

If you have rental on your policy, take advantage of it; if you are a claimant hit by someone else, they have to put you into a rental vehicle.

“They won’t agree with our appraiser.”

Appraisers are not repair professionals. Never give up your rights on a claim. You should NEVER let any repair shop negotiate and settle your claim with a person who doesn’t repair vehicles. Shops that “agree” often with appraisers are trying to remain friendly with the insurance companies. YOU are the customer; never let a “preferred” shop demote your status!

“We have had a hard time with that shop. We can’t work with that shop.” Typically means the shop is reputable to the point that it refuses to cut corners and keep information from you, the vehicle owner. These are the shops consumers should “prefer.”

“They are not on our preferred list.”

“Preferred” means the insurance company “prefers” you use a shop that has signed an agreement to pre-negotiate your repairs by giving the insurer discounts, using inferior parts, and possibly not doing all necessary processes to repair your vehicle properly. Many of these shops will admit that the insurer is the real customer because they are “paying the bill” That is YOUR money!

“If you go to a non-preferred shop, your repair will be delayed waiting for our adjuster to inspect the vehicle.”

Delays are the insurer’s issue and should not be your problem. Most state insurance regulations state insurers must respond within a reasonable amount of time. This is simply another tactic to “encourage” you to use a “preferred” shop and hoping to appeal to a “microwave society” mindset.

“If you go to our shop we can pay them directly and it will be faster.”

Why would you want them to pay the shop? It is your money, the check should be written to you!

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“IT’S YOUR CAR – IT’S YOUR CHOICE”

You have the right to select the shop that will repair your car. In fact, to make processing your claim easier on you, select the repair shop, leave your car there, and notify your insurance agent or company.

How many estimates do you need for a car repair?

In Ohio, you only need to get one estimate. Your insurance adjuster may need to inspect the damage before approving your claim. If your insurance company has a drive-in claims service, and your car is safe to drive, call them for an appointment. Take your car there. Make sure you get a copy of the insurance adjuster’s estimate, and take it and your car to the car repair shop of your choice.

Some insurance agents may tell you to get two or three estimates. Talk to your insurance adjuster first. Generally, claims are handled by the insurance company’s claims department, not agents.

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Nine Guidelines to Choosing a Repair Facility

Finding the right place to repair your car can become a tedious task and at xxxxx Body Shop we recognize this. So, in order to better help your decision we have compiled guidelines to better help your search.

The shop should offer a “Lifetime Warranty” on its body work, and a minimum of “5 years”, preferably “Lifetime” on refinishing.

Ask the repair facility if they use new “Original Equipment Manufactures” parts, purchased from the dealer, or imitation parts. If the shop says they use IMITATION PARTS, leave immediately. No one can perform quality work with junk parts.

Make sure the repair facility is an “I-CAR” as well as an Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certified facility. This assures you all technicians have been trained, and certified.

Tour the facility and look at the quality of work and cleanliness of the operation. Examine finished jobs and jobs in progress.

Ask the shop if they have any affiliation with insurance company Direct Repair Programs (DRP). If they are under contract to work for any specific insurance company they cannot work for you. Working for both sides is not ethical. Look for a repair facility without insurance company ties. The DRP agreements require the facility to work on “their” cars first offering discount on parts and labor, as well as concessions on repair procedures which will affect the quality of repairs to your vehicle. This could cause extensive delays in your repair.

Verify the repair facility is registered with the state Board of Motor Vehicle Collision Repair and is a member in good standing. <snip>

Check with friends, co-workers, or mechanics for a recommendation on a repair facility.

Never listen to an insurance representative who surely has a friend that they can recommend. Remember their bonus is tied to “low price.” In addition, the adjuster may secure favors (free work or cash) for recommending shops.

Be wary of repair quotes that are significantly lower from that of a quality repair facility. What are they not doing in the repair process that will affect the safety, appearance, and value of your vehicle?

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What is a Direct Repair Program?


Direct Repair Program (DRP)Direct Repair Programs (DRP) insurers have in place with “preferred” shops are not for the benefit of you the consumer. They are strictly a way for the insurer to maintain control of the repairs, price fix, and keep their costs to a minimum and maximize their profits. Through these agreements, many claims are paid out at far less than what you, the insured are contractually owed.

DRP shops are “graded” on how fast and cost effective the repairs are done; quality too often takes a back seat. These agreements also state the shop must pay for your “extra days” of rental if they do not have the vehicle repaired in the time the insurer thinks it should take. The insurer is not a car repair professional!

Ask yourself if you want your vehicle repairs potentially compromised because the shop has to rush the job or suffer a “failing grade” and pay for a portion of your car rental. Is this the motivation you want your repairer to use when your car is in the shop? Safe and proper repairs should be the primary motivation of all shops.

You will find that insurers are not warranting anything. While they may claim to warranty non-factory, salvaged (junkyard) and remanufactured parts, ask the insurer how they can warranty your safety in the meantime while you drive down the freeway at 70mph with junkyard suspension parts under your vehicle! A warranty is no good if you are injured, or worse.
 

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Say what you will and think what you will, but my experience with the "preferred" body shop suggested by ALLSTATE (the at-fault driver's insurer) when my wife's Elantra got hit was excellent, and when a wheel that the insurance company had refinished rather than replaced had an issue AFTER the repair, the body shop replaced the wheel with a new one no questions asked, and again, the damage repair looks outstanding, was all done with OEM parts, and looks perfect!

Of course, this may not be typical and I'm sure others may have had issues as noted in the post above, but we were in no way pressured or coerced into using that facility, which again, was ALSO the one recommended by our Hyundai dealer.

It was a Ford dealership by the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, I decided to go with the dealers collision center, outside of my insurance network. It has been a nightmare; only because I had an aftermarket clear bra installed, had to have it reinstalled, paint issues, and now one is blaming the other, and it's been a mess.

From my experience, if I only needed work done at one place, then I could really go wherever I wanted. But, since I needed the main place to sub out something else, I should have gone in ins network so the ins company can back me up. UGH!!!

Thanks for all the replies...
 

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Say what you will and think what you will, but my experience with the "preferred" body shop suggested by ALLSTATE (the at-fault driver's insurer) when my wife's Elantra got hit was excellent, and when a wheel that the insurance company had refinished rather than replaced had an issue AFTER the repair, the body shop replaced the wheel with a new one no questions asked, and again, the damage repair looks outstanding, was all done with OEM parts, and looks perfect!

Of course, this may not be typical and I'm sure others may have had issues as noted in the post above, but we were in no way pressured or coerced into using that facility, which again, was ALSO the one recommended by our Hyundai dealer.

It was a Ford dealership by the way.
I've used USAA all my adult life and they tend to be stringent as to whom they allow to be on their preferred repair facility list
.
 
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