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My left rear bearing has bit the dust and rather than spend $500-$600 to have a professional handle the repair, I decided to have a go myself. I made the mistake of watching an Auto Doc video in which it took the ******* about 7 minutes to do the job. It looked easy.

Well I have removed the wheel and the caliper. In preparing to remove the rotor, I didn't find the screws I was expecting to see. Instead there appears to be a solid layer of steel recesses about 1/4 of an inch in the area I would expect to find screws. I removed the cotter pin and the castle nut from the axle. I have beat the crap out of the rotor, but can't seem to get it to break free from the hub/bearing assembly. Am I missing something? Since there are no screws, is it attached some other way?

Also, if I somehow manage to solve this puzzle, how in the bloody **** am I going to find a way to get to the four bolts holding the hub assembly in place?

Anything you've got would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance
 

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Pics ?
 

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Probably a fine layer of rust and your ebreak. Is there a hole in the rotor hat where you can look through and see the rear break adjustment mechanism? Typically small spoked wheel you can turn with a pic to either tighten or loosen the ebreak pads.

If/when you're done, clean the hub of rust and spray with fluid film to prevent from seizing.

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If you got the wheel and caliper off ...
The rear brakes are actually two brakes
One is the disc and caliper system
The other is the E-brakes
There is usually a set screw or two to remove
Then the E-brake must be released
This is like a drum brake inside the hat portion of the disc
A hole lines up to the bottom where the brake adjuster is
Sometimes it is covered with a grommet
When you turn the brake adjuster in the correct direction, it should release the disc
Then all you have to worry about is the rust holding it in position
A couple of whacks with a three pound hammer should work
Or it may destroy your disc/rotor

Good luck in your efforts

Note: AutoDoc videos are done with cars that are fairly new and have no rusted bolts or nuts
Not the real world situation.

 

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Haha, I love YouTube videos where they have all the various tools at hand and the whole process takes less than 10 minutes.

Instead of a hammer direclty on the rotor face you might want to use an edge of a 2x4 when you strike so you don't beat the piss out of your rotor. Otherwise, everything stated above should do it.

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LOL

No signature in your Post!!

If you're in the rust belt it will be hours getting at it and out. If yours is AWD take it to a independent garage you like and its a lot cheaper especially if you buy your own bearing. Everything gets rusted together on these as if they're welded. I had bearing changed (tried many times myself and gave up after couple of days) by a local mechanic and when I did the rotors and pads replacement yeah, a 10lb hammer wouldn't beak the rotors free for a long time. I think I damaged one of the bearings with all the whacking and check again in the spring since there is noise coming from one of them.

PS EDIT: Oops, I just notice yours is AWD on the subject. Crawl under an look behind the backing plate of the brake assemble and axle which also has a toothed signal gear. There are 4 bolts going through the backing plate you have get at and work out about 1.5"

I got to that point and realized my socket was damaging that gear and might have cracked it. I did not but I closed it all up, took it to a mechanic and paid 1.5hrs labour and done. Bearing is well rusting into the backing plate for sure and is NOT coming off. Mine was whaled on with a hammer on his work bench to separate them. I don't give up easy but there were too much damage I was causing that would have cost me a lot more than the labour charge.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, thanks to you all you indirectly led me to a video about adjusting the e-break. The guy in the video got fed up and used a couple of 8m bolts to push the rotor away from the hub. It dawned on me that since I didn't have any screws holding it in place, the two threaded holes that were empty were for this purpose. Took me two whole minutes with no hammering to get the rotor off...Amazing!

Now on to the next part of the problem: Breaking loose the four impossible to get to bolts from the back of the hub assembly. AWD or ABS sensor blocks any reasonable access. Anybody have any luck with this set up?
 

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@sbr711 is probably the best resource at this point but here is a repair procedure from the newer Santa Fe's which you can hopefully find useful in your case.

Looks like taking off arm, spring, shocks will allow you to unbolt the entire assembly. Does look intimidating if you are wrenching it yourself for the first time.

http://www.hsfmanual.com/rear_hub_carrier_repair_procedures-391.html

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It isn't going to help and taking the shock bolt out ain't going to happen! They're welding in the collar for sure.

You have to press the axle shaft inward towards the diff which moves the toothed ring back away. A socket couldn't be used in my case as it backed into the ring damaging it. Oh shhhh.....t I said. There are flares in the casting so making it impossible to use a boxed end wrench initially either. I used an very old wheel puller I had for 40 years and never used to push the axle inwards but not hard or bottoming it out. I didn't want to damage the diff. The garage guy did the same thing when I told him. Working on the hoist is a whole different ball game with better angles for the tools. Only 3/8" sockets and ratchet can be used as well. Nothing else will get in there to even remotely fit.

ITS A SUPER PAIN and the guy who designed this ought to be force to spend the next ten years removing these rusted bearings out of the AWD's.

Looking at your Photo. The backing plate and bearing casting looks very clean compared to mine. No rust there which will make separating everything a whole lot easier when you get the bolts out. If you have to remove the e-brake shoes. Those two big springs require massive amounts of pull to stretch them. I spent 4 days and gave up and then another day when the lose parts started to destroy themselves without the pads in. It took most of the last day trying to stretch them and into their respective holes. NEVER AGAIN for me.
 

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.....

ITS A SUPER PAIN and the guy who designed this ought to be force to spend the next ten years removing these rusted bearings out of the AWD's.
Yeah, but that's the difference between doing it correctly and doing it without pulling a bunch of other things and potentially causing more damage. Just removing the rear brake caliper bracket a 2013 Sonata has you unbolting suspension parts. I agree it's poor design or at least one that doesn't favor the person fixing this but again, the assumption is you have the proper tools and experience to approach something like this correctly and not hack it.

Let us know how it turns out. I hope you get things out in one piece and without too much swearing.
 

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The shock cannot come out without at least a Torch to free it on the pin and you're looking at new shocks then for sure. I tried getting it off and no way if its rust as it is for most of us who have snow and salt to deal with. Trying to pull the shaft can't happen unless it is at least removable. I've done this type of bearing in other vehicles but the had the sensor in the bear and access to the mounting rear bolts which the SF doesn't have. I doubt any Hyundai dealer pull that all out since they'd damage the shock mount as well.
 

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Oh yeah, being in the rust belt makes any suspension work a nightmare for you guys. Hopefully the submitter is in Arizona and can break the shock bolt. And if it breaks, he probably needed a new one anyway. That has seriously been my question before. If I'm unbolting all this garbage, what else looks like it might need replacement now because I don't want to do it again... ever.
 

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This gonna sound a little strange, but use Teflon tape on the new bolts when you put everything back together, one or two wraps at the most. If you ever need to take it apart again, the job will be much easier. It's a dry lubricant so it won't attract dirt and debris like a grease or antiseize will. It's good for more than just pipe fittings.

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This gonna sound a little strange, but use Teflon tape on the new bolts when you put everything back together, one or two wraps at the most. If you ever need to take it apart again, the job will be much easier. It's a dry lubricant so it won't attract dirt and debris like a grease or antiseize will. It's good for more than just pipe fittings.

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Wouldn't that alter the torque rating of the bolt. I've been a fan of fluid film since it doesn't alter that and slows corrosion. I'm all for making things easier to be removed but Teflon tape on suspension components seems like a bad idea. You wouldn't put PTFE on you lug studs.

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Don't know about using Teflon tape
But, have seen where grease or anti-seize does change the torque
What happens is that the bolt with anti-seize will go well beyond where the dry bolt would normally stop with a specific torque
This puts the bolt under extra stress

 
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