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Discussion Starter #1
I just remembered that my headlight had some condensation in it when I got home from the dealer. I purchased in December of 2017 and this was literally the day I got it home. I haven't seen it since then and was wondering if anyone else had noticed it. The vehicle was in the showroom prior to me purchasing but the temps were in the low to mid 70's when I drove it home so there wasn't a major temperature change. Anyone else have this? I am keeping an eye on it as I don't think it should have happened but it's possible that there is a vent for this headlight that also lets humidity in.
 

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Take it to the dealer. The headlight is not sealed properly. Eventually the condensation will leave dried grime in the headlight lens.

Sent from my SM-N950W using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Take it to the dealer. The headlight is not sealed properly. Eventually the condensation will leave dried grime in the headlight lens.

Sent from my SM-N950W using Tapatalk

I'll let them know when I take it for my first service. Thanks.
 

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Some condensation may be normal as today's headlamps and other lamp assemblies are not totally sealed units. Condensation would be a fine mist covering less than 50% of the lens. More than that or large droplets / pools of water at the bottom of the lens may indicate a water leak or a blocked air vent in the lamp. The following comes from GM but it is largely applicable to many of today's lamp assemblies. Your situation "sounds" like a leak, but perhaps it was washed or cleaned in a humid environment, such as a wash bay.

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The following information is being provided to better define the causes of condensation in exterior lamps and includes guidelines for determining the difference between a lamp with a normal atmospheric condition (condensation) and a lamp with a water leak.

Some exterior lamps, such as cornering, turn signal, backup, headlamps or tail lamps may exhibit very small droplets of water, a fine mist or white fog (condensation) on the inside of the lamp lens. This may be more noticeable on lamps with “multi-lens” designs and may be normal during certain weather conditions.

Condensation occurs when the air inside the lamp assembly, through atmospheric changes, reaches the “dew point.” When this takes place, the moisture in the air within the lamp assembly condenses, creating a fine mist or white fog on the inside surface of the lamp lens.

Most exterior lamps on General Motors vehicles use a vented design and feature a replaceable bulb assembly. They are designed to remove any accumulated moisture vapor by expelling it through a vent system. The vent system operates at all times, however, it is most effective when the lamps are ON and when the vehicle is in motion. Depending on the size, shape and location of the lamp on the vehicle, and the atmospheric conditions occurring, the amount of time required to clear the lamp may vary from 2 to 6 hours. Customers with short commutes will experience a longer time to clear the lamp.

Completely sealed headlamp assemblies (sealed beams) are still used on a limited number of models being manufactured today. These lamps require the replacement of the complete lamp assembly if a bulb filament burns out.

Condensation
2014 Sierra Headlamp, Full and Partial Examples

Object ID: 3789054Click here for detailed picture of the image.

Object ID: 3789057Click here for detailed picture of the image.
A Fine Mist or White Fog on the Inside Surface of the Lamp Lens Occurring After a Period of High Humidity
•May be located primarily in the lens corners (near the vents) and SHOULD NOT cover more than half the lens surface.
•The condition should clear of moisture when the vehicle is parked in a dry environment, or when the vehicle is driven with the lights ON.
•A comparison of the equivalent lamp on the opposing side of the vehicle indicates a SIMILAR performance.
If the above conditions are noted, the customer should be advised that replacement of a lamp assembly may not correct this condition.

Water Leak
2014 Acadia Tail Lamp Example

Object ID: 3803382Click here for detailed picture of the image.
2014 Silverado Tail Lamp Example

Object ID: 3789062Click here for detailed picture of the image.
2014 Camaro Headlamp Example

Object ID: 3789063Click here for detailed picture of the image.
Numerous & Various Size Drops of Water Collecting on the Inside Surface of the Lamp Lens After the Vehicle Has Been Exposed to Rain or a Car Washing Environment
Important: Moisture is most noticeable during the Spring and Fall of year, due to high humidity and the large fluctuation in temperature between day and night.

Note: Any of the conditions listed below would indicate the need to service the lens or lamp assembly.

•A condition that covers more than half the surface of the lamp lens.
•An accumulation of water in the bottom of the lamp assembly.
•A condition that WON'T clear when the vehicle is parked in a dry environment, or when the vehicle is driven with the lights ON.
•A comparison of the equivalent lamp on the opposing side of the vehicle indicates a different performance.
Note: A different performance of lamps on opposite sides of a vehicle DOES NOT always indicate that one lamp is bad, and the other is normal. For example, on a cold day when the sun is hitting only one side of the vehicle, the normal condition of one side showing clear and the other showing fogging/moisture, could be misinterpreted as a bad lamp. The customer may comment that, or you may need to inquire if, the moisture “comes and goes.” Moisture “coming and going” is considered a normal condition.

If a lamp is found to be exhibiting a leak, review the most recent version of Service Bulletin 02-08-42-001 for information regarding impact damage and modification inspection.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Some condensation may be normal as today's headlamps and other lamp assemblies are not totally sealed units. Condensation would be a fine mist covering less than 50% of the lens. More than that or large droplets / pools of water at the bottom of the lens may indicate a water leak or a blocked air vent in the lamp. The following comes from GM but it is largely applicable to many of today's lamp assemblies. Your situation "sounds" like a leak, but perhaps it was washed or cleaned in a humid environment, such as a wash bay.

Mine was more of the "white fog" and I haven't seen it since the day I brought it home. It's even been to a carwash and had a full wash/detail with zero condensation in the headlamp. My Nissan had a vent in the headlight assembly and I figured this one did too. I guess I won't worry about it unless it becomes recurring.
 

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White fog sounds normal. I know that our wash bay is a VERY humid area due to the age of the buildings and lack of good ventilation. Idf they gave your vehicle a quick interior or exterior clean before delivery....Very possible that may be where it came from.

We typically see more of this during the spring and fall seasons as we may have warm daytime temperatures, cool to cold night temps, and humidity around.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
White fog sounds normal. I know that our wash bay is a VERY humid area due to the age of the buildings and lack of good ventilation. Idf they gave your vehicle a quick interior or exterior clean before delivery....Very possible that may be where it came from.

We typically see more of this during the spring and fall seasons as we may have warm daytime temperatures, cool to cold night temps, and humidity around.

Makes sense, it was warm earlier in the day and cooled off after I picked it up.
 
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