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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm snowed in today due to that wonderful winter storm that is still in this area and I just got my PierceMotorsports 6 point chassis brace. Here's a picture of it and some close-up shots of the welds.









 

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Those welds look pretty rough, especially the third one. Yikes.
 

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I've seen better welds myself, the brace is cool though, it will improve the handling if you drive like in the Fast and the Furious movies. :3gears:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I agree with everyone that they look pretty rough. They are solid and I don't see any issues with them. We'll see how they hold up when I go do some autocross.

Also given the fact that they literally mock these up on cars they have per order I didn't expect perfect welds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quick update everyone, I just spoke with James @ Piercemotorsports and here's what he said about the welds:

"The tacks are large/mig welds and then we run over/around the joint and tack and it leaves a mark that's out of the pattern. It looks like it's tig welded and it's actually migged which is near impossible to do!"

Overall this product is awesome and is VERY well built with solid welds. I'll be sure to update once it is installed this Spring and I get some results!
 

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sweet, lookin forward to review. I know adding subframe connectors to my F-Body made a world of difference, wondering if it'd do the same for the E =)
 

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All I know about weld (been a ticketed machinist for the last 11 or so years) is that if we had welds like that on any of the work we ship out the door it would not pass any kind of inspection.

They look like all TIG weld from a guy with a severe set of the shakes.

Hopefully James knows what he's talking about.
 

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Those are NOT tig welds.

The outer tubes where the bolts go through are washers tic-tac welded onto the end of an open piece of tubing.

Where the tubes are mitered and joined looks like ****.

Some welds are too cold, some welds are too hot, some areas are too fast.

Will it fail??? Hard to say, in the area it is being installed in tension and compression you will know quick because it will seperate at a weld.

.....

I see they sell chromoly tubing which SHOULD ideally be tig welded, then heat treated afterwards to normalize the whole assembly and prevent stress areas.

Saying that i doubt they have a tig machine, and whomever has the mig machine should practice more before selling pieces to consumers.

.....
At least its not overly priced for what it is i suppose.
 

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Hey guys---heard about the thread through the grapevine and wanted to respond as the manufacturer. I agree the pics do not flatter the welds at all---the white actually highlights the imperfections and the close up's really show the different size beads/direction. Keep in mind that the tubing we're using is about the size of your thumb and the beads/pattern is between 1/8" and 3/16" which is about the size of a pencil lead an artist would use. If you were to take a pic a couple feet away it would look like 90% of the similar products out there---in fact better than most from what we've seen in our shop.

We've been welding/notching tubing since the late 1980's and while I don't think we've welded a million mittered joints, it's certainly been several hundred thousand. We've used Chromoly more than anything else over the years because it's much more rigid than mild/carbon steel and allow's us to use a thinner wall and get superior results. It's also very versatile and can be gas welded (it's original preferred method), migged, tigged, or fusion welded. Thin wall tubing is normalized during it's production process and doesn't require annealing. The thicker material absolutely does---in fact when we build crossmembers/bulkheads we'll send the whole piece out for heat treat which both relaxes and improves the overall strength. I'm a NASA rallysport technical inspector and while chromoly is currently not legal, we used to be allowed to use it and could use a thinner material which gave everyone the misconception that it was lighter than mild steel---it wasn't, just lighter because it was thinner and legal...

We both mig and tig weld at our shop everyday---most of the chassis brace stuff is migged while most of our stainless products are tigged. This brace is mig welded---we cut a cromoly tube and then weld a laser cut washer on the end of the tube for the mounting points---it looks like tig and fools some people. Most all of our braces are built on a jig/table, but because the 6 point has 14ft of material that wants to pull all over the place it's actually started on the car itself. It's tacked upside down in the car and then removed and bolted to the jig---we run over the joints/larger tacks (which stick out like a sore thumb!) and finish the joints---allow it to cool---then remove and test fit on the car.

I've attached a couple of pics of some of the current projects we're working on this week. The DP is stainless and tigged by the same guys doing the braces---the mainhoop (rollcage) is for a Subaru Open class rallycar and from a distance the welds look fantastic---when you close up on the center gusset you can see that they're very nice, but it's easy to notice the different bead overlap/sizes--nothing wrong with it at all. The other pics are of a 6 point before it was cleaned up and painted---the tacks are on the other side of the brace and not as visable...The above brace is super strong/light/rigid and will make a noticeable difference when installed on Paul's car---even just driving it on the street he'll notice a difference. The brace will never fail from stress/duty cycles---it's bulletproof and warrantied forever! Impacts from rocks are another story.
http://i320.photobucket.com/albums/nn341/jlpierce76/IMG_04441_zps322618db.jpg
http://i320.photobucket.com/albums/nn341/jlpierce76/IMG_04451_zps712c4580.jpg
http://i320.photobucket.com/albums/nn341/jlpierce76/IMG_04461_zpsa3924f83.jpg
http://i320.photobucket.com/albums/nn341/jlpierce76/IMG_04471_zps4e15fc36.jpg
http://i320.photobucket.com/albums/nn341/jlpierce76/IMG_04491_zps019368dc.jpg
http://i320.photobucket.com/albums/nn341/jlpierce76/IMG_04501_zps3e1dd396.jpg
 

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x2, Nice to see you here James.
 

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Welcome james! NOW MAKE MOAR PARTS FOR THE MD/GD/VELOSTER PLATFORMS! (please and thank you)
 

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Here is some welding -



 

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I did meet a guy about 15 years ago that designed his own truck and jigs for welding fittings and pipe runs for Helium tanks. When he was done installing, those joints were absolutely flawless. Incredible...looked like a work of art you could hang in the Louvre. To someone that had not seen the process, they would have thought a robot had done them. In fact, the joints looked exactly like sbr711's pic. Not one blemish. Up until then, I didn't know that a human being could possess that kind of welding skills.

There are some talented people out there. The hard part is finding them. And they usually come at a price. But, worth it, IMO.
 

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I would be embarrassed to have welds like that leave my hands. I would expect better welds from a welding student. Very poor IMHO
+1 Agree, John. That student would remain a student until which time he could satisfactorily show me he/she had mastered the course. That type of welding is not the work of a true professional. Or, maybe those of us on here are real sticklers for perfection. I, sort of, fit that bill.

I couldn't weld two clothes hangers together, but I know what the finished product should look like when it's been completed.
 
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