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lokito50, hose pictured below is air duct from air box to throttle-body on 1.6 GDI turbo vehicle;


The following is tutorial for using CRC GDI Intake Valve & Turbo cleaner;
 

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Photos of air hose assembly removal to access throttle body for using CRC GDI cleaner;

Removed the 10mm worm clamp from air box. Did not remove the three small hoses at that location;


Then removed 10mm worm clamp from throttle body (10mm bolt should be facing firewall for access / removal);


I then carefully manipulated entire assembly out and let rest on windshield cowl. This provided enough room to access throttle body with CRC GDI cleaner can. Take care when removing hose assembly out of the way that small wire loom in photo doesn't get pulled on. It can easy be moved out of way. It's seated on top of hose assembly in wire guide.


The long nozzle can be seen below air hose and black wire loom, directed towards throttle body. CRC can, is able be sprayed upside down as well. Take care not to insert nozzle to far unto throttle opening, you may hit spinning turbo impeller. Also, realized that some cleaner will drip out of throttle body, and wasn't sucked in as with traditional throttle body. This may cause cleaner to leak on ground if something is placed below while performing procedure;



Hope this proves somewhat helpful.
 

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Hi again,
Are you guys doing this to the rubo version? I was taking a peak at that hose posted in a picture earlier and it leads to the turbo?
Maybe I'm wrong. Anyone with the turbo version care to post some pics indicating where they sprayed this can? I would greatly appreciate it.

Cheers
lokito50, I've since added some photos of process as I performed procedure.
 

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Follow up correction:
Wire loom referenced in 3rd photo, "Take care when removing hose assembly out of the way that small wire loom in photo doesn't get pulled on. It can easy be moved out of way. It's seated on top of hose assembly in wire guide", is actually shown in photo 2 (and 4), my apologies!

 

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Hey , Ill be honest I haven't read the entire thread. But I do have some info i can share. Once carbon builds up on the backs of the valves , the additives and whatever intake cleaners do not really do anything. Get a catch can and put it on as soon as possible. Also driving the car hard ( don't kill your transmission) is beneficial as it evacuates the crank case vapors better.

Also there's a little vacuum line that you can take off on the intake manifold, some intake cleaners come out of a can and can be shot right down that . ( if there is vacuum ( you can feel with your finger) ) that is going to get your cleaner shot into the engine.
 

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Ford doesn't recommend this type of product in its GDI Ecoboob engines because deposits that may be removed by it can damage turbo blades.

I'm not too worried about intake deposits as engine deposits in the form of metal particulates including disconcerting slivers in my new long block means that the engine may not long last enough for the intake valves to crud up ;-)
 

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I just did my Tucson this weekend. Wedged a long ice scraper between seat and gas pedal. Got to about 2,500 rpm and sprayed away. Must have been relatively clean because I did not detect any additional soot coming out of tailpipe after the procedure.
 

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Well, here is a food for thought. In 2 of those videos, it mentions the damage to catalytic converters when carbon breaks off the valves and goes through the chambers. So, if it can happen on its own, what happens to all the carbon that the cleaner removes? It goes out the same way, so how much damage would a cat get over using the cleaner?
 

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After going through two of the Isuzu 3.5L V6 GDI engines and only learning & paying attention to the special needs that GDI has after that first expensive failure, I became a believer in this CRC product. Lost the first engine at around 80K and you should have seen the intake valves, geez. The BG shop treatment was of course recommended but the techs at that dealership and some others spoke highly of the CRC when you do it right and regularly, and it does work well. Important to note that it is a maintenance/preventative measure just like fuel treatment. If you neglect and then do CRC/BG later, that's when you can potentially see some harm. It's a slower effect but the high PEA content does its job. I've got a couple friends that use it on their GM and Honda GDIs, all good so far. I've only treated my Tucson once thus far but after the learning experience with the Isuzu engine I have zero qualms about the small additional expense and time to use this product once a year-ish and have seen the difference it can make over time. Top tier gas or tank additives don't do the same thing. I'm sticking with a 4K oci with PP/PUP, Techron in the tank every 5k, and the CRC annually. I catch it on sale for 40-50 percent off and buy a few cans. Take your time when using it...long spurts may collect in the bends/crevices of the air intake and just pool there to collect later microdust. You shouldn't see anything out the tailpipe unless the engine has been neglected/high mileage. With the second Isuzu engine when it finally gave up with about 150K on it, I got to take a look via scope at the valves and they looked much better than the previous failed engine, and in a roundabout way also got to see the inside of one cat, which had no fouling or bits in it. This is only slightly more than anecdotal evidence, I know, but over that decade I saw enough to make me think the product is both useful and necessary even now a couple GDI generations down the line. I'd have no problem paying a shop to do the BG treatment but I like to do most things myself. I've not used them but 3M and ATP have similar intake products that have about the same formulations. This is one of those things that's best just to do right and do it from the start, like oil, imho.
 

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This is where we are at with these engines. Fuel treatments to prevent them from getting destroyed. What I don't understand is how Toyota was able to overcome this issue with dual injectors (port and Direct) to prevent the carbon build up but no other company can use this or a similar solution. Absolutely boggles my mind.
 

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Ford and a couple German automakers are switching to double injectors. No automakers will admit that the GDI-only implementation is a complete failure.

I don't worry about debris deposits from cleaning. They slough off on their own often enough. The turbo and catalytic are tough too. Engines are more expensive to replace.
 

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Out of curiosity, along with these treatments, is anyone actually monitoring the before/after PID's like fuel trims, misfires, flow rate, MAP values, O2/AFR values, compression... etc. to see if the cleaning actually made any sort of difference? I'm all for keeping intake valves clean but if the measure of success is "it feels more responsive", how does anyone know if it actually made any sort of difference? Again, not trying to knock cleaning the intake and back-sides of valves. I have both my SFS and HS hooked up to a catch can so I recognize the caking is a problem. I see that I'm getting delicious looking stuff out of them but have no clue if it's making any short term, long term or even noticeable difference.
 

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Out of curiosity, along with these treatments, is anyone actually monitoring the before/after PID's like fuel trims, misfires, flow rate, MAP values, O2/AFR values, compression... etc. to see if the cleaning actually made any sort of difference? I'm all for keeping intake valves clean but if the measure of success is "it feels more responsive", how does anyone know if it actually made any sort of difference? Again, not trying to knock cleaning the intake and back-sides of valves. I have both my SFS and HS hooked up to a catch can so I recognize the caking is a problem. I see that I'm getting delicious looking stuff out of them but have no clue if it's making any short term, long term or even noticeable difference.
I did on that Isuzu second engine but you have to think of this like heart disease or something. If you're neglecting things and then try to fix it up after the fact, that's when you may notice some difference in performance/metrics, but at that point it's likely that you need to unbutton the engine and do some mechanical cleaning and see what you have going on. If you use this as preventative maintenance, which is what it's designed for, then you should not really notice much difference. When the neglect is pretty bad, you'll definitely see the difference and you want to avoid that...$$$. PEA isn't going to keep it spotless clean but it can prevent buildup to the point that valves aren't sealing and thus may burn or start a snowball effect.
 

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https://docplayer.net/38978662-Cons...tion-in-gasoline-direct-injection-engine.html

Positive crankcase ventilation(Blow-by) was not related to carbon deposit formation
This is pretty scary because so many believe their c̶a̶t̶c̶h̶ condensation cans are doing something positive. I'd consider these three ideas. Condensed fuel is wasted fuel. Captured/condensed oil could benefit engine as upper cylinder lube. Water vapor could reduce detonation/preignition like water injection.

Since condensation cans, with their plumbing, can decrease PCV flow, it can increase oil contamination by not allowing enough fuel/moisture/vapor to vent. So, one must weigh the pros/cons. This is why none of my cars run catch cans.

Want to add a vacuum pump? Go for it
 

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https://docplayer.net/38978662-Cons...tion-in-gasoline-direct-injection-engine.html

Positive crankcase ventilation(Blow-by) was not related to carbon deposit formation
This is pretty scary because so many believe their c̶a̶t̶c̶h̶ condensation cans are doing something positive. I'd consider these three ideas. Condensed fuel is wasted fuel. Captured/condensed oil could benefit engine as upper cylinder lube. Water vapor could reduce detonation/preignition like water injection.

Since condensation cans, with their plumbing, can decrease PCV flow, it can increase oil contamination by not allowing enough fuel/moisture/vapor to vent. So, one must weigh the pros/cons. This is why none of my cars run catch cans.

Want to add a vacuum pump? Go for it
This is very interesting considering how much catch cans are being championed as the best solution. It reminds me of some research I saw posted on the bobistheoilguy forums a few months ago (I’ll share if I can find it again). The findings saw a much higher rate of deposits on engines using full synthetic exclusively, which was fascinating. The post was a couple years old, but I’m surprised it didn’t generate more discussion about the general best practices for gdi engines.

Note: it’s entirely possible I am misremembering the chart that was posted. But if I read it correctly longer intervals between changes caused more problems with Group 4 oils.
 
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