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This thread Mechanical Review of 2019/2020 SF
mentioned lines near the oil filter go to oil cooler. Perhaps the oil doesn't get hot enough to burn off the dilution?
Fuel used to burn off easily. Talking with a tribologist friend of mine, fuel today is highly refined and does not burn off in most street vehicles. You would need to take your car to a track and really rip it for 1-2 hours to burn off any residual fuel in your crankcase.
 

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Fuel burns off just fine.
Problem is TOO MUCH fuel that builds up too quickly/excessively with certain driving parameters. GDI+highcompression+turbo+emissionstuning = nightmare

Oil cooler is an oil heater in cold weather, using coolant temp to get oil warmed up quicker and keep it in a narrower temp range. Its not designed to overchill the oil.
 

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Engines are running hotter than ever before. Right on the edge....why is this a common problem now.
Engines hotter yet more fuel.
No ....fuels do not burn off as much as you would think.
Even cars in Arizona driven only on the highway will build up fuel and not burn it all off.
 

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I imagine if you changed your oil at 3k miles like back in the day it would not be a problem.
 

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I contacted Quaker State. All Hyundai's from the factory come with their synthetic oil. Every model comes with their special syn. You cant buy it in stores.
It must be a special blend because the only Quaker State synblend I find in stores nowadays is High Mileage synblend.
 

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2019 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.0T HTRAC
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Probably has special formula to allow extended period and it is ok for the occasional use as the vehicle can be on the dealer lot for a long time. Perhaps it is wise to change the oem oil earlier than the scheduled period. I know many of us did that.
 

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2020 Santa Fe Limited 2.0T Awd
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Probably just has high amount of zinc to help with breakin
 

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I went in for the complementary oil change at 1500 miles, oil level was down about a quarter of a quart after the service, not a big deal just saying, then changed oil again at 3000 miles useing my preferred oil and checked the next day and added a few more ounces to full mark. So far at 1200 miles still on full mark after sitting over night, I do that to keep the readings consistent, oil does not smell like fuel, Im hoping things stay stable, we'll see when I send in a sample.. :)
 

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It is a special synthetic formula made just for hyundai as per their specs. You can not buy it in stores.
I still changed mine after 1000kms. Then at 3000....then at 5000kms.
 

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Engines are running hotter than ever before. Right on the edge....why is this a common problem now.
Engines hotter yet more fuel.
No ....fuels do not burn off as much as you would think.
Even cars in Arizona driven only on the highway will build up fuel and not burn it all off.
I believe my 2013 SFS 2.0T utilizes a 180 F stat - back in the late 60s and early 70s when cars, especially american made struggled to meet newly enacted emissions - makers ran the engine hot to be emissions compliant so it was not uncommon to see 200 F stats, this was the era of gas engines running on or dieseling after ignition shut down. So with gdi and turbos cc temps are certainly high - but that heat is rapidly shed thru greatly improved engine cooling systems, the result is that it can take longer today for gas vapors to be boiled out of the oil.
 

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I believe my 2013 SFS 2.0T utilizes a 180 F stat - back in the late 60s and early 70s when cars, especially american made struggled to meet newly enacted emissions - makers ran the engine hot to be emissions compliant so it was not uncommon to see 200 F stats, this was the era of gas engines running on or dieseling after ignition shut down. So with gdi and turbos cc temps are certainly high - but that heat is rapidly shed thru greatly improved engine cooling systems, the result is that it can take longer today for gas vapors to be boiled out of the oil.
You are talking coolant temp. I'm talking combustion chamber temps. They are much hotter than the 200f cars of old. Many cars are running on the ragged edge of lean.
Trying to burn every nano meter of fuel.
Fuels have adapted to this in 90% of the vehicles on the road.
 

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Lean leads to high NOx emissions, and many engines, especially turbo or higher compression ratio, don't run lean when under load.

Engines aren't running hotter than ever. Thermostat is just one component of too many that determines how hot an engine runs. I have one engine that runs 190F with a 195F thermostat and another runs at 210F with a 180F thermostat. And, I have an engine with a 220F thermostat for the engine block to reduce friction while the head uses a 190F for emissions and detonation/LSPI prevention, along with controlled oil temps usually 200F.

Nothing special about Hyundai factory fill oil. Little hint about OE factory fill oil, regardless of the automaker or oil brand..... putting the oil brand on the oil fill cap or in the owners manual leads to a BIG discount for the automaker on the assembly line. Its marketing and I know of a few automakers that had "free" factory fill oil for the advertising on the oil fill cap or owners manual. YES, when an automaker recommends a brand, its ADVERTISING for that brand.

Factory oils have nothing special in them. The only thing you will see in a factory fill oil is the assembly lube that the oil washes off the assembled surfaces.
 

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All factory oil UOA's I have seen have different make ups compared to store bought oil equivalents.
They are different as per manufacturer requests. They do not get oils for free that is a myth. Maybe 50 years ago but not now. Discount yes but not free.
I had a very long conversation with a Quaker state and Castrol tech about this years ago.
Go ahead give them a call.
 

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You are still talking coolant and now oil temps.
I'm talking combustion chamber temps. You cant monitor these with any of your tools.
Go digging through articles. Modern cars CC temps are higher than cars 20 years ago.
This is all for emissions and mpgs
 

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No, modern cars don't have higher CC temps. They have better control of CC temps for emissions, catalytic performance, and catalytic life. CC temps are meaningless to the average consumer. Exhaust temps are what I've monitored too often(too many overly tuned vehicles over the years). Exhaust temps follow CC temps and just haven't seen anything close now to a few of my vehicles from 30 years ago. So, I don't see overly hot CC temps in newer vehicles. I see them warm up more quickly, and have better control of that heat... nothing much hotter.

When it comes to oil diluted with fuel, base oil choice isn't relevant. You've lost your film strength and film thickness. You've increased the oxidation rate of the oil. You've contaminated the oil with excessive fuel. Viscosity and colloidals are the only way to help. Both are frowned upon. Visc choices were common in Hyundai's, more so than other automakers. Go thicker if you're not an MPG environazi.
 

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No, modern cars don't have higher CC temps.
That's very true. One of the ways of reducing Oxides of Nitrogen is to reduce combustion temp. That's been achieved by chamber shape and ignition timing.
 
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