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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had my tires changed last month (OEMs to Defenders). I noticed immediately that my gas mileage dropped by like 2-3 mpg.

Last weekend, I drove my Sonata on my first long-distance trip (350 mi.). With Eco on, I got 30.4 mpg. On the return leg, I had Eco off, and got 34.6! And, when I refueled, and drove through the metro area, I got 38.8, again, w/ Eco off.

Does anyone have some perspective on this? I am stumped. :confused:
 

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I noticed the same phenomenon right from the get-go. Eco mode felt sluggish and the car really struggled. Not sure how that can be a good thing for fuel economy? So I turned Eco mode off and monitored it for a couple months - MUCH better fuel economy with Eco mode off!
 

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I have noticed that with ECO mode on, the car shifts sooner and the throttle response is a bit off. Because of these things, most drivers tend to be on the throttle a bit harder to compensate.

The harder you are on the throttle...the lower your fuel mileage will be.

I am probably wrong, and I know for certain someone will correct me ;)
 

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what is tire weight difference?

Is it exact same size from OEM to replacement tires?

Friction due to tread pattern can be a difference also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have noticed that with ECO mode on, the car shifts sooner and the throttle response is a bit off. Because of these things, most drivers tend to be on the throttle a bit harder to compensate.

The harder you are on the throttle...the lower your fuel mileage will be.

I am probably wrong, and I know for certain someone will correct me ;)
This was all highway and cruise control.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
what is tire weight difference?

Is it exact same size from OEM to replacement tires?

Friction due to tread pattern can be a difference also.
I was wondering about the traction effect too, but why would Eco yield such poor gas mileage versus Eco off?

Could the increased traction of the defenders be causing the computer to mess up with Eco?

As for weight, I doubt that would be a factor, since my return trip had another hundred pounds of books, but I got great mileage. Curious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here's another thought: maybe "Eco" doesn't refer to mileage at all, but to reduced emissions or other Eco -logical aspects?
 

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Eco is a buzzword. Can mean anything. But with this they are putting an emphasis on mileage.

Its a crap button in my opinion. It leads people to believe that they push a magical button and everything gets all rosy. Because it dumbs everything down; the typical driver (as explained above) tend to stomp on it more to "get power".

In my opinion you are much better off watching the instant meter to learn how to drive your car for mileage.
 

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ActiveEco makes the throttle response softer, lowers the shift points, and cycles the A/C compressor more (when it's in use). At very heavy throttle, the ActiveEco tweaks are ignored and there is more immediate response. So it is easily thwarted by a heavy foot. I always recommend that people try a tank with it "on" and another with it "off", trying to keep everything else (temperature/time of year, trip distance and city/highway mix) fairly even. If you get better mpg with it off, leave it off. For easy-going drivers, ActiveEco can improve city mpg by roughly 5%. For those with a heavy right foot, it can degrade fuel economy because the driver will learn to press the pedal down further the get the rate of acceleration they are accustomed to feeling.
 

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I get good gas mileage with it on......CPU reads about 36 and that is the average.....when I fill up I have 540 miles to E which is reduced when I stomp the gas of course. The best my average has read is 42 give or take a mile.

I have yet to do the old school calculation though.

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As mentioned it affects the throttle response and shift points. But I can't see it making much difference on a long highway trip with the cruise control on. I would suspect that other factors were contributing to the fluctuations.
 

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I stopped using ECO a year ago. Even after I changed tires and wheels I still get better MPG with ECO off. The only time ECO really works good is when you never let the RPMs go over 2000 before the next up shift. 1800 RPMs is the optimal high point where the ECO gets good MPG. Should be called the Granny Button.
 

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I get better or same mileage with ECO off too (~0.2 diff).
This is really simple. ECO works for drivers who are ECO drivers, accelerate slower than drivers around them & know how to handle terrain properly. Generally, I use it to good effect, averaging 39+mpg with my 2013 Elantra.
 

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1800 RPMs is the optimal high point where the ECO gets good MPG. Should be called the Granny Button.
Not true. My 2013 Elantra is automatic & keeps getting better mpg well below 1800rpm. One 30+mile run, with rpms worked to get 1200-1500-1800rpm, the trip computer showed 49-51+mpg.

Our Washington state is lovely & is at its best when seen at a slow pace. Your slur, Granny Button, applies to all people who want to travel & save money at the same time.
 

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I was reading this wondering the same thing...why are we talking mpg's for sonata vs elantra...

I have had Eco button on since we bought car and I agree it makes it feel sluggish...but I punch it, she still gets up and goes! This last fill up I turned it off and well see how the mpg's go
 

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I was reading this wondering the same thing...why are we talking mpg's for sonata vs elantra...

I have had Eco button on since we bought car and I agree it makes it feel sluggish...but I punch it, she still gets up and goes! This last fill up I turned it off and well see how the mpg's go
The Sonata and Elantra differ by 4mpg on the EPA city cycle, but the ActiveEco works the same way. They both can offer improvement of up to 5-6% if AE is "on" and allowed to do its thing.

As you noted, dropping the pedal throws ActiveEco out the window and the car wakes up and goes.

Let us know how you do with the button "off", and keep in mind that the recent colder weather will affect mpg as much as or more than the button setting.
 

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Not true. My 2013 Elantra is automatic & keeps getting better mpg well below 1800rpm. One 30+mile run, with rpms worked to get 1200-1500-1800rpm, the trip computer showed 49-51+mpg.

Our Washington state is lovely & is at its best when seen at a slow pace. Your slur, Granny Button, applies to all people who want to travel & save money at the same time.
Optimal high point. Meaning that beyond that there is no improvement. Anything under that is optimal. Everyone knows that the lower the rom shift points, the better the mpg.



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