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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm loving my 2018 Tucson so far, but I've noticed one odd thing. When it says it's just about empty (e.g. range 10 miles, fuel light on, etc.) and I fill it up, I'm only able to add ~14 gallons to the tank before it's full.

The website said it had a 16.4 gallon tank, so the first time I thought it was just odd and that maybe the pump's sensor had been overly sensitive, but I repeated the process (driving until it was empty) and again was only able to pump 14 gallons into it before it was full.

Does my car have an issue, or is the trip computer/gas gauge set to be a couple of gallons off to be conservative (to keep you from running out of fuel) or does the Tucson have a smaller tank than I think or what?

At this point I'm 2,000 miles into owning it and the most gas I've pumped into at once, ever, is 14 gallons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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If you're in the US pretty much all vehicles here have a "reserve" after the gauge says empty. Usually around 2 gallons or so. Of course you don't want to run it almost empty anyway. Though the gauge isn't very accurate either. The gauge in my 2017 SE drops really fast down to half a tank then very slowly after that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you're in the US pretty much all vehicles here have a "reserve" after the gauge says empty. Usually around 2 gallons or so. Of course you don't want to run it almost empty anyway. Though the gauge isn't very accurate either. The gauge in my 2017 SE drops really fast down to half a tank then very slowly after that.
Actually I do want to run it almost empty. My job is a mixture of working from home broken up with a lot of ~500-600 mile round trips, so my car ends up being used mostly for long highway cruises on big interstates that have gas stations pretty much everywhere.

Over the years, I've gotten into the habit of running my car down to empty (actually empty) before filling it. My VW was very accurate, when it said I had 5 miles left and I filled it I'd put nearly the maximum tank capacity into it filling up.

It does seem like one of two things is true:


1. The gauge is accurate, and the website listing for gas tank capacity is wrong (i.e. the car holds only~14 gallons)
2. The website is right, but the gas gauge/range computation is either miscalibrated or intentionally designed to be incorrect (i.e. keeping a two gallon cushion at empty to help avoid running out of gas)


Has anyone pumped 16 gallons of gas into their recent model year Tucson?
 

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Actually I do want to run it almost empty. My job is a mixture of working from home broken up with a lot of ~500-600 mile round trips, so my car ends up being used mostly for long highway cruises on big interstates that have gas stations pretty much everywhere.

Over the years, I've gotten into the habit of running my car down to empty (actually empty) before filling it. My VW was very accurate, when it said I had 5 miles left and I filled it I'd put nearly the maximum tank capacity into it filling up.

It does seem like one of two things is true:


1. The gauge is accurate, and the website listing for gas tank capacity is wrong (i.e. the car holds only~14 gallons)
2. The website is right, but the gas gauge/range computation is either miscalibrated or intentionally designed to be incorrect (i.e. keeping a two gallon cushion at empty to help avoid running out of gas)


Has anyone pumped 16 gallons of gas into their recent model year Tucson?
Running your tank almost empty isn't good for your fuel pump. Both my Tucson and previous RAV4 had approx. 16 gallon tanks. Both only fill up about 12 gallons when they hit 1/8 tank. Empty isn't really empty in US vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I suspect the gauge is intentionally incorrect. I follow the CR-V forum and there have been questions / complaints about the same thing for the 2017 CR-V...

2017 CRV LX AWD Gas Tank is Smaller than the Specs

https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?sh...m/forums/showthread.php?t=142962&share_type=t

2017 CR-V gas tank size

https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?sh...m/forums/showthread.php?t=145681&share_type=t

My understanding is that the reserve is a way to keep the fuel pump from overheating.
Running your tank almost empty isn't good for your fuel pump. Both my Tucson and previous RAV4 had approx. 16 gallon tanks. Both only fill up about 12 gallons when they hit 1/8 tank. Empty isn't really empty in US vehicles.
That's a reasonable explanation, but it also kind of sucks. The terribly short cruising range I'm getting is really my only major complaint with the car at this point. With my VW I routinely ran over 500 miles between gas stops. I expected worse performance with the Tucson, but didn't do the math properly because I wasn't factoring the 2 gallon cushion into my numbers. I regularly put over 17 gallons into my CC (often almost 18), so when I figured 16 x 28ish (again, all highway cruising) I figured I'd be the 450 neighborhood. As opposed to what I'm actually getting, which is below 400 (which makes sense, as 14 x 28 is only 392 miles).

If I'm really going to get under 400 miles to a tank I'll live with it but I may end up regretting going with the Tucson as a result. The super short range means even my shortest out of state customer trip (from where I live in the Chicago 'burbs to Indianapolis, IN, about 393 miles) will always require at least one gas stop. :(

I'm loving the car otherwise, but this is going to drive me crazy.
 

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I just bought my 2018 Hyundai Tucson (value edition, 1.6L turbo, AWD) last Saturday. This will be my third Hyundai, my last being a 2014 Sonata, which spoiled me on gas mileage. After someone made an illegal left in front of me and my car was totaled, I wanted to go back to a small SUV. I knew that my mileage would go down. But I am a bit bummed at how much difference there is (on the first tank of gas). My has light hadn't come on, but my estimated to empty was about 30 miles (quicker fill on my way in to work than later in the day). I filled up with 13 gallons of gas, only had 309 miles driven (mix of city/highway). I believe the gas tank was full when I purchased on Saturday. That would put me at just under 24 mpg. I know I need to go through a few more tanks to have a better idea of my mileage. But being spoiled with my Sonata and only having to fill up about once every 2 weeks, and going back to weekly fill ups, is kind of a bummer. We routinely visit family, a 12 hour trip, and my Sonata could do the trip (one way) with just 1 fill up (so about 1-1/2 tanks of gas).

Yes, I read the mileage estimates before buying. But was hoping I have enough highway driving mixed in to put me up just a bit more on mileage. When I recently changed jobs and went from mostly city driving to a mix of about 50/50 on my Sonata - the difference added about 5 days extra of driving between fill-ups (so put me toward the top end of the mileage range). This even though my new job is slightly further away. I was hoping the same would happen with the Tucson. It now occurs to me that something I didn't account for was going from FWD to AWD (live in Colorado). That probably has some effect.

That said, I am thoroughly enjoying everything else about the car. Has a very smooth and solid feel, is quiet, handles well. I guess in the scheme of things, my mileage on the other vehicle I was seriously considering (Mazda CX-5) would have just garnered me ~45 miles extra per tank. It is mild dissatisfaction, but the trade off between a car and an SUV.
 

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If you've bought a brand new Hyundai it is wrong to start measuring fuel consumption straight away.
These engines are really tight when new and they need to be driven gently, as in no right foot hard down acceleration, and no high speeds, until the engine has had time to settle and loosen up.
That's a couple of thousand miles, or about 3,000 km for the majority of the world who are in metric units.

The fuel consumption will improve markedly, but of course it depends more than anything on the style of driving of the owner....
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you've bought a brand new Hyundai it is wrong to start measuring fuel consumption straight away.
These engines are really tight when new and they need to be driven gently, as in no right foot hard down acceleration, and no high speeds, until the engine has had time to settle and loosen up.
That's a couple of thousand miles, or about 3,000 km for the majority of the world who are in metric units.

The fuel consumption will improve markedly, but of course it depends more than anything on the style of driving of the owner....
In all highway use I'm already seeing mpg at the high end of the manufacturer quoted range. If that gets better I won't complain, though. ;)

That said, with only fourteen gallons of fuel I'm just going to have to get used to much more frequent fill ups. Some weeks I drive 0 miles, but I also frequently drive 600-800 miles in two work days.

I generally love the car otherwise, so I guess it's a minor annoyance in the grand scheme of things.
 

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Its very hard on the fuel pump to run the fuel level that low, for various reasons, otherwise my gauge seems very accurate, As far as mileage in a previous post im getting upper 20's city and low 30's hwy useing 91 non oxy, does the price difference equal out, I dont really know but it runs better especially when its warm out..:)
 

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It is correct almost all cars, trucks and vans sold in the US have a “reserve” amount in the tank that is below where the float stops.

When the float stops lowering, that’s when the low fuel light comes on. Think of that as E.
What varies between vehicle models is how much fuel remains when the light comes on. Typically it’s between one and two gallons.

In almost all cases, that fuel is spread out across a couple square feet and only the pump’s intake is in that volume.

Lots of people say “oh my god, you’ll burn your pump out if you keep running the tank to “E””.

Statistics prove otherwise. Very very few fuel pumps burn out at less than 100,000 miles. How many of you keep your vehicles that long?

I’ve owned eight vehicles over 32 years, all but my 2017 Tucson SE were used. I’ve only had to replace pump one, and the car was 16 years old and had 160,000 on it and I always run my tank to the light on every car.

The real issue with running fuel that low is water and other contaminates. Water mostly. Water is absolutely in the fuel we get at the pump and it gets into our tanks. If you aren’t treating your tank every so often, you will get excessive moisture in the tank and that will corrode the electronics in the sender.

All that said, most fuel pumps are cooled by the fuel in the tank. But they are much more durable than you think.
 

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It is correct almost all cars, trucks and vans sold in the US have a “reserve” amount in the tank that is below where the float stops.

When the float stops lowering, that’s when the low fuel light comes on. Think of that as E.
What varies between vehicle models is how much fuel remains when the light comes on. Typically it’s between one and two gallons.

In almost all cases, that fuel is spread out across a couple square feet and only the pump’s intake is in that volume.

Lots of people say “oh my god, you’ll burn your pump out if you keep running the tank to “E””.

Statistics prove otherwise. Very very few fuel pumps burn out at less than 100,000 miles. How many of you keep your vehicles that long?

I’ve owned eight vehicles over 32 years, all but my 2017 Tucson SE were used. I’ve only had to replace pump one, and the car was 16 years old and had 160,000 on it and I always run my tank to the light on every car.

The real issue with running fuel that low is water and other contaminates. Water mostly. Water is absolutely in the fuel we get at the pump and it gets into our tanks. If you aren’t treating your tank every so often, you will get excessive moisture in the tank and that will corrode the electronics in the sender.

All that said, most fuel pumps are cooled by the fuel in the tank. But they are much more durable than you think.

All that said, most fuel pumps are cooled by the fuel in the tank. But they are much more durable than you think.
This is true about the fuel BUT since the removal of sulphur which was used as a lubricant fuel pumps have had issues with survival and longevity! Maybe not so much in newer vehicles since the manufacturer's are aware of this issue now. When the Government removed sulphur from the fuel fuel pump replacement went up ten fold because of lack of lubrication and they over heated thus burned out!!!!
Water and other contaniments on the bottom of the tank is the main reason not to run your gas tanks that low plus when you do finally fill up you stir up all those contaniments so now they are mixed into you fuel so make sure you do regular fuel filter changes every 30,000 miles! Just my experience/knowledge by the way!!!!!
 

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GM is still having issues with pumps malfunctioning because of low fuel levels below 1/4 tank especially in hotter climates...Some pumps may never fail but why push it if its not necessary..
 

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Water and other contaniments on the bottom of the tank is the main reason not to run your gas tanks that low plus when you do finally fill up you stir up all those contaniments so now they are mixed into you fuel so make sure you do regular fuel filter changes every 30,000 miles! Just my experience/knowledge by the way!!!!!
The fuel pump is at the bottom of the tank. It is always taking fuel from the bottom. Think about it. How can it only take fuel from the "top"?
 

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Fuel light came on on the way to the petrol station, range suggested 50 kms/30 miles and guage was reading near to zero. 60.83 litres went in when brimmed, which I believe is over 16 US gallons. I think the first click off was at about 15 gallons. So the specs from Hyundai are probably correct. You just have to see how low you want to go and how much you want to fill.
I admit to brimming it before a long journey where the extra range might avoid an extra stop before reaching my destination, even though it is not recommended. Otherwise, I let it drop to 1/8 full and fill to first click-off. Not had a problem with anycar using this pollicy.
 

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Just looked in the manual, mine states 14.8 capacity yours may be different, I don't let mine get below 1/4 tank so I'm not sure how much i could stuff in...:)
 

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Ours is supposed to take 62 litres (16.3 US gallons). I guess the Czech Tucsons are a bit different to the genuine Korean ones :)
 
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