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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I'm still having no luck with the dealer locating a Tucson for us so I'm thinking about seeing if I give them more options if that might help.

I initially told them it had to be FWD, mainly because I don't see any need for AWD and don't want to sacrifice the 2-3 mpg for something I don't need. I'm reconsidering only if it means I might have the Tucson a lot sooner. I've only test driven the FWD and I'm not sure that a test drive would even be long enough to determine the differences.

Besides the price increase and mpg drop what other disadvantages are there to AWD? Is there more road noise? Is it a rougher ride?
 

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I purchased a AWD only because I was thinking of the snow we get here in NY once and a while. But in Cali I don't think you'll ever have to worry about that. You are correct the MPG is a bit less with AWD. IMO I would recommend that you hold off if you can for a FWD. No need to pay the added 2k to the vehicle especially if you cannot benefit from having a AWD. I haven't compared to two but I can tell you that a AWD will stay in FWD mode unless AWD is needed, i.e. poor traction, slipping. The vehicle monitors the wheel speed of each wheel and engages the AWD only when needed. You can also lock it into AWD if you press the switch on the dash, but that will release the AWD when your speed climbs over 35 mph (or about there).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
QUOTE (Pinto_Siftbean @ Jun 9 2010, 11:25 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331340
Do you go into the mountains in the winter? Skiing? Visiting? Get heavy rains where you live? Lots of things to consider before blowing off AWD..
It rains here but never snows. I think I've been high enough up the mountain to be in the snow maybe twice in the last 5 years.

So if the AWD basically becomes FWD over 35mph then it should ride the same at that point? Why is the MPG affected at highway speeds?
 

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I know you are anxious to get a Tucson but I'm sure in cali you don't need AWD. You could do something nice with that money, like take a road trip or something. What are you looking for in a Tucson that is making it hard to find?
 

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QUOTE (JGar @ Jun 9 2010, 03:16 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331377
It rains here but never snows. I think I've been high enough up the mountain to be in the snow maybe twice in the last 5 years.

So if the AWD basically becomes FWD over 35mph then it should ride the same at that point? Why is the MPG affected at highway speeds?
Actually the AWD works at all speeds invisibly only as needed! The AWD lock button just engages all wheels completely up to about 25mph, then disengages above that, unless you push the button to turn it off, or it will re-engage itself below 25mph. It is not made to be driven in AWD lock on hard, dry, pavement, it puts excess wear on the system unless needed. I bought the AWD because I live in curvy, hilly, rural PA. and it's harsh winters, but right from the beginning, after driving both, FWD, & AWD, I found the AWD version to be more firmly planted, secure, & stable, on the road, under all speeds, road conditions, & weather. The vehicle is a bit heavier with AWD, and of course there is more drivetrain friction, that's why the mileage is a bit less on the highway, but it is minute, and worth it to me.

The FWD versions I drove seemed to be kinda light feeling, & on occasion I found it peeling out (losing traction) when I accidently took off on patches of dirt, or gravel on the side of the road, in certain maneuvers. I would think this would occur in certain conditions of heavy rain, snow, or ice, as well. There is a certain measure of extra traction, roadholding ability, and security on the AWD I guess I've liked, & become accustomed to from my previous AWD Tucson, & 4WD Santa Fe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (HyundaiLvr87 @ Jun 9 2010, 01:40 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331416
I know you are anxious to get a Tucson but I'm sure in cali you don't need AWD. You could do something nice with that money, like take a road trip or something. What are you looking for in a Tucson that is making it hard to find?
We told them we wanted a Limited without AWD and no Nav. The stock at local dealers seems to be 10:1 GLS vs Limited and the few Limiteds they do have have both the Nav and AWD. We also gave a list of our top 3 color choices. We've received no estimate as to when they might be able to locate one. Don't the dealers have access to reports that show them what's coming in for like the next 4-6 weeks?
 

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No, they do not. They can put a request in for what they want but they don't know if they will get exactly that vehicle or when it will arrive. Most of the ones on the east coast have nav and the roof but there are a few without it. Why not shopping out of state to see if you can get a better deal and see if they have the vehicle you want? If you save money, you could always have it shipped to you so you don't rack up the miles.
 

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Hyundai Canada is now offering no charge all wheel drive on the GL model until June 30th, which is a savings of $2400. I guess they are overstocked on GL AWD? That also comes with 0.9% financing for 60 months.

I should have waited.

:crying:
 

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QUOTE (JGar @ Jun 9 2010, 04:23 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331441
We told them we wanted a Limited without AWD and no Nav. The stock at local dealers seems to be 10:1 GLS vs Limited and the few Limiteds they do have have both the Nav and AWD. We also gave a list of our top 3 color choices. We've received no estimate as to when they might be able to locate one. Don't the dealers have access to reports that show them what's coming in for like the next 4-6 weeks?

That's so odd. When we were looking, the dealers in/near southern Alabama had far more Limiteds than GLS, and the GLS they did get in were black or white. We wanted GLS w/ popular equipment pkg in nearly any color other than black or white (or iris blue - too dark for the heat, where white shows dirt too quickly).

We ended up agreeing to have our dealer do a dealer trade from two states over in Louisiana to get the exact Tucson I wanted with my 1st choice of color and they drove it in. I was a little concerned about the starting miles for something I was paying for new, but I wanted it now and it was worth it.

I couldn't testify to the drive'ability of AWD because we also had no need for it; it's never snowed in the time I've lived here, though it sort of thought about it once this past winter before the mid-day temperature rose and it rained instead. I can, however, testify that the FWD is more than enough to handle most any warmer climate issues. As we enter hurricane season, we do get random heavy torrential downpours that will go from cloudy sky to solid walls of water in less than a few seconds' time that'll disappear ten minutes later.

When I've been unlucky enough to be out driving in that in the past two weeks, my FWD stayed planted just great despite the inches of accumulated water that the road couldn't drain fast enough. With ABS, not-bald tires, and not flooring it to the carpet out of a stop light, the FWD seems to handle extremely heavy rain without any protest to make me think AWD would ever be worth that extra expense. I think you'd just be wasting your money unless you do head into icy or snowy weather enough to justify it. The FWD was more than a match for some ugly torrential downpour and wind gusts without the vaguest hint of a hydroplane, and it was heavy enough weight-wise that the wind gusts didn't knock it all over the road (like my old car used to suffer with).
 

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Just my 2 cents on the issue:

I chose the Santa Fe in 2002 over all other vehicles for many reasons, but the clincher was its manual-automatic transmission. Living in west Michigan, we get plenty of snow, but AWD is overkill 350 days a year. The beauty of the Santa Fe, and now again with the Tucson, is when you encounter slippery conditions, you can drop it into manual, upshift it into 2nd (or even 3rd), and take all of the torque out of the drive wheels. I have NEVER been stuck in my Santa Fe, or my 2006 Sportage, and there were plenty of opportunities to do so! I also drove an Audi Quattro A3 for the past two winters, and I didn't feel any more secure in that than in either of my Hyundai/Kias.

I wanted nothing to do with paying the extra $$$ for the AWD, the extra $$$ each time I filled up the tank, etc. If you're not in a huge rush, wait it out.

Good luck with your purchase.

tim B)
 

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Is the AWD on the latest Tucson similar to Kia Sportage's Dynamax AWD where it improves cornering handling and it's more proactive rather than reactive to road changes? I figure since a SUV is taller and higher road clearance than a regular car, traction/handling become more paramount. Also, does the Tuscon AWD normally drive 100% power to the front wheels until changes in the road make it transfer some of that power to the rear wheels? I read that such cars like the Tiguan AWD normally drive power 90% to front wheels & 10% to the rear wheels until road condition changes.
 
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