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Discussion Starter #1
Hi!
What is accent's normal stock fuel pressure in psi? I'm turning returnless fuel system into return one and wanna put adjustable FPR. Can't find it anywhere. Is it 50 psi or what?
 

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If the regulator is pre-set to provide 49.8 psi (give or take a bit), I'm not sure how you'd go about performing your test on a lesser pressure. Each application has a somewhat different set of specifications, I'm sure that your engine would start and run on a lesser pressure but might falter under high rpm or load. If you can't keep the pressure at "spec", the first place I'd look would be the regulator or the pump, with too high a pressure you'd run rich & with too low, you'd have a tendency toward lean. You do want the pressure to vary to some degree when the engine is under load - that's when you want a higher pressure to richen the mixture, on mechanically controlled regulators you'll often see a vacuum hose that goes to the regulator - when the vacuum drops, it causes the regulator to increase the pressure to the fuel rail.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes, I understand this.
I'm going to be turboed and need to turn my returnless fuel rail into return one. I'm putting an adjustable FPR for this. But a few days my car will drive N/A before I come to place where my ECU programmer lives. Should I connect a vacuum hose that goes to the regulator to the intake manifold or not when my car is N/A?
 

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QUOTE (darkcorp @ Oct 14 2010, 01:06 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=363378
Yes, I understand this.
I'm going to be turboed and need to turn my returnless fuel rail into return one. I'm putting an adjustable FPR for this. But a few days my car will drive N/A before I come to place where my ECU programmer lives. Should I connect a vacuum hose that goes to the regulator to the intake manifold or not when my car is N/A?
I don't know what N/A refers to. I was looking for a description of the fuel delivery system to see if the regulator is external or internal to the pump - I couldn't find the description, so I'm assuming that it's part of the pump similar to other returnless configurations I'm familiar with. If you're changing the configuration to one with an external regulator and an external return, you'll probably need to change the pump as well and then add a return line inlet to the tank. At the other end, you'll need a fuel rail that will accept the 2 lines or find a fuel rail with a built in regulator. Whether you attach a vacuum line to the external regulator depends on what it needs to control "load" or demand conditions - installation instructions should tell you this. You should do some research and determine how the stock system fulfills this task to make sure you don't end up with a conflicting control.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
N/A means 'naturally aspired'.
Yup, accent has internal to the pump regulator. I'm going to take out the ball in the pump that works as return valve.
My sheme is this like:


I'm choosing between two shemes.

I know all you say. I guess when my car goes naturally aspired I shouldn't attach a vacuum line. When it is turboed I will attach a vacuum line to the intake manifold.
 
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