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My sisters 04 Hyundai has a frosted headlight. Is that how the vehicle was made or has the light just deteriorated. I am not talking about the external surface of the whole headlamp but of the two lamps that are inside the whole casing. The high beam light is clear but the main headlight is kinda frosted. I was just wondering if this is normal or if it needs replacement. Are there any better lighting solutions for this car?
 

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That isn't a manufacturer issue (that's not how they were made). What happened is that the seal that goes around the outer lens when it was assembled has perished and has allowed moisture into the inner portion of the headlight assembly. Basically, there's nothing you can do but replace them. It happens with normal wear. Most of the time it's on the outer lens but it wouldn't be the first time that I've seen it happen. If you want a deal you should check out eBay, there's always something on there.
 

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I looked at both the question and the first reply and then looked at both of my 03 GLS's. Both of them have a "frosted" looking lens that looks like it is mounted in front of the low beam bulb but still inside the housing. Both of my cars have had this since new. Can you post a picture of yours? I'm interested now to see if you have a different headlight assembly or a gasket leak as 03sonatagls stated in his reply.
 

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Both of them have a "frosted" looking lens that looks like it is mounted in front of the low beam bulb but still inside the housing. Both of my cars have had this since new.
Let me add some technical insight:
This is made on purpose.
Why ?

A conventional headlight consisting of reflector (parabolic), bulb and glass normally has a structured glass.
The reflector alone projects images of the filament to the distance, which means that you would actually see 'springs' of light on the road which would be very irritating. The structure of the glass has 3 functions (2 intended, 1 parasitic)

1. blurring the filament imaging so the light on the road will be diffuse/smooth to the extent needed to avoid above mentioned irritation

2. redirection of fractions of the beam by groups of 'ribs' to influence/shift light distribution

3. the parasitic: diffuse scatter to make the headlamp visible to the outer world. The optically ideal lamp would be invisible from any place outside the beam.

B.t.w. this (3) is what DRLs are doing: diffuse light into the upcoming traffic to create visibility.

Now we switch from the past to the present:

The modern headlamp does not use (plain rotation symmetric) parabolic reflectors but free contour reflectors (made possible mainly by the progress in computing and plastics processing) to control light distribution. So function #2 of the glass is obsolete.

remains 1 and 3

Both can be addressed in two ways, depending on the remaining parts of the lamp being present or not: Lens (optical, glass) and/or outer lens (aperture 'window', usually made of polycarbonate plastic, having no optical function at all - just keeps dirt and water out ...)

Case A: with optical lens inside

reflector of continuous shape (smooth, no visible facette like 'elements') plus lens. Due to the lens, #3 is almost not existing and filament imaging will exist at least partially (distorted due to deviation from ideal parabola shaped reflector).

Cure (and now we get to it): 'Frosting' the glass lens (partially) or (as it's done on the Trajet headlight) modification of the normally flat backside of the (collimator) lens to a wavy cross section profile.

Case B: no optical lens used, just a 'window'

similar issues, just more diffuse scatter will be there.

Cure: breaking the ideal calculated reflector contour into flat facettes. A flat surface will always result in divergent beams (if light comes from a dot shaped source). Diffuse scatter gets created at the mating lines of the facettes.
 
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