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Discussion Starter #1
I searched for posts, so I'm sorry if this is already answered, but I didn't find anything. I found a post about the 2 screws, but no mention of the center nut...
Just a quick question:

Does the 2 screws hold the front rotor on, or does the center nut need to come off also? I was looking at it today and I can't tell if the nut over laps the rotor to hold it on, or if the rotor just slides over it... I had the 2 screws off and the rotor didn't budge. I already read about the rust holding the rotor on, but I didn't hammer the rotor because I wasn't ready to replace it today.

So just the 2 screws or the center nut also?

Thanks

I just want to throw in that I do like the brake setup on the 2009 sonata, seems pretty straight forward as far as removing the calipers, pads, pins, bracket (except the bracket bold behind the arm, kinda hidden back there...) A lot easier than the previous mazda6.
 

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No, don't take the center nut off, that's for the axle. Just take the two little retaining screws off.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ok, thanks :thumbsup:
guess i'll need to get the hammer ready b/c that rotor wasn't moving on its own. I'd like to do this myself so I can spend the extra $$ on above average pads & rotors instead of paying a shop for labor.

Thanks again for the help
 

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Before you start pounding, spray some penetrating oil around the studs and the center hub and let it soak in for awhile. Then tap with a hammer around the studs and the hub to loosen in it up. After that, a few whacks with a heavy hammer on the back of the rotor should knock it off. It's a little nerve-wracking, but it shouldn't take too much pounding to break it loose.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've seen that video before, kinda cool & simple as long as it doesn't damage the threads... I'm going to tackle the front end this week I hope. I was thinking about going with Napa premium rotors and probably the Safety Stop pads. Everything should run $120 & should do just fine for day to day driving.

I know there are already plenty of brake pad threads, but I only found a couple comments on the Napa Adaptive One pads. Anyone use these? Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So here are the Napa Premium Rotors & Adaptive One pads. Does anyone want me to do a step by step with pics for the front rotor/pad replacement or would that just be a waste of time? I plan on doing this Friday 8/13...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
well, i guess i'll follow up on my own post for future reference...

I returned the rotor in the above pic because it looked like it was already mounted (or attempted to be mounted) on another car. the back had grease & dirt on it and I also didn't like those 2 circles going around the outside edge. It was replaced with another new rotor that was still sealed.

I spent almost 3 hours doing the front brakes/rotors on Friday. everything went smooth once I got my dad's sledge hammer to help those rotors off. I cleaned the hubs off with my dremel and greased the hub & the inside of the rotor hat. I took plenty of time to clean and grease everything including the sliders again from last weeks cleaning process. I also check the backing plates to make sure they weren't bent or loose and rubbing the rotor.

I took the car out for a test drive and everything went fine for the first 20 minutes or so and then the squealing came back. At this pointed I was getting a little annoyed. Instead of taking it back to my dad's place to take everything apart again and go through another couple hours of, well, what else could I clean and check? So I took the car to the place that did my back brakes a couple months ago to have them look at it quick. The owner went around the block with me and at the first turn, the squeal was again acting up... he took the front brakes off and applied the de-squeal. Then he took it out again and the squeal was still there. Then he put the de-squeal on the back then took it out again. squeal was gone!

So a long story short, even though the sound seemed like it was coming from the front, I guess it was in the rear the whole time. So be sure to check front & rear for squeals even though you're certain it is in the front. I'm not sure what the mechanic used, but the write up says "sprayed de-squeal" so I'm assuming something like the CRC spray de-squeal, and not the rubber stuff. The new Adaptive pads seems to work fine, but I only have about 150 miles on them. Time will tell.


*just a side note...on my test drive with the new brakes, I stopped to the Hyundai dealer and asked if they had time to look at it and was told it is not under warranty and they would have to charge me just to look at my car*
 

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Discussion Starter #11
ok, this is my last post on my own thread, just want to update with some info in case anyone else runs into this same problem.

My brakes started squealing again a couple days ago...go figure. So I changed my oil tonight I didn't really want to get into the back brakes since I started the oil change @ 7pm. But I took off the driver side rear tire to have a peek :thumbsup: I found the red rubber stuff the garage put on last weekend & I also noticed NO GREASE and A LOT OF RUST. So I figured this was my problem. I should have checked the rears after I changed the fronts myself, but thought the garage would have cleaned and re-greased when they did their job a few months ago. So I spent the next 3 hours taking apart both rear brakes, using a hammer and flat head to pry the pads from the clips & the clips from the brakets, using my dremel to sand off all rust on brackets, clips, and ends of pads (wow we have small rear pads! I think my 10 speed Huffy had bigger pads) Then greased the brackets, pins, clips, greased clips where the pads touch & greased the tabs on each end of the pad. The pads fit much better when you take away those few mm of rust and crap. Then I put oil back in the car after it drained for 2.5 hours then I drove around for 10 miles - guess what, NOT ONE SQUEEK or SQUEAL.

So I guess the bottom line is if you have noisey brakes, clean down to the bare metal and grease everything, even if a repair garage did the work, check yourself. Oh yea, this will probably be an annual cleaning by the looks of it.
 

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First off, I give you a pat on the back for trying to solve the issue yourself! And ultimately getting the whole job done yourself. I will state the obvious here, but I make it a habit, even when doing brakes on just the front, or just the rear, to at least pull the wheels and calipers on the brakes that I'm not working on to double check them. Although the pads may be fine, always pull the calipers and check the slides, and in your case make sure the pads are lubricated properly and float properly in the caliper. I drive a VW stick shift vehicle, and because of downshifting saving wear on brakes, typically I get about 60k miles out of rear pads, so I always check the rear calipers to make sure nothing is seized up when I replace my front pads.

Okay, the obvious is out of the way. Now. a little trick. If you want to isolate a caliper to see if it's a squeaker, buy a brake hose clamp tool. (available at any ***good*** auto parts store).

Reach up behind the wheel and clamp the soft flexible hose on the caliper you suspect is causing the problem. Now, tie the clamp out of the way so it doesn't interfere while driving. Take the car for a test drive, but NOT on major roads, as you've just disabled one of your calipers. (isolating your variable) If your squeaking goes away. Whallah, it's that wheel. If you think both rears are squeaking, then pinch off both rear calipers and give it a drive. You've essentially put all the braking to the front wheels so BE CAREFUL!! and don't EVER do this on a road with traffic. And if you suspect it's a front, and pinch one, you're going to get a steering pull while braking when you pinch off one front caliper.

REMEMBER, this is VERY backwoods, but works AWESOME! It's not dangerous, as long as you know where your e-brake is and you stay away from roads with traffic. As you work on vehicles longer, you'll be able to pinpoint locations of noises very easily without this method.

Keep up the good efforts. Repairing a car is 90% correct diagnosis, 10% work. Don't rush the diagnosis and do too much work!

~Lucky
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