Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What type of floor jacks do you guys use to lift your sonata for oil changes and tire rotations?

Please provide the following:

Brand Name
Capacity
Cost
Where to buy

I am assuming you guys lift the car on the jack points which is on the side of the car?
 

·
Registered
2020 Santa Fe SEL Plus
Joined
·
2,225 Posts
I use metal ramps for the oil changes but I use two floor jacks to rotate the tires. They are about $25 each at Wal-Mart and other retailers. This way you can jack up the car and move the tires from one place to another without letting down the jack.

This is on my 2008 and 2009 Sonatas but I can't imagine it would differ for the 2011 models. The jack points are probably in the same locations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Bought a 3.5 ton heavy duty jack from Checker auto years ago for like $60.

Walmart has a 3 ton for about $99 and Sams club has a 3.5 ton for about $70.

Watch Checker Autozone Pep Boys etc flyer adds usually in the Sunday adds.

3 to 3.5 tons is overkill but but has lasted way longer than my 2 ton punk **** cheapo jacks from Walmart. I have one good jack, my 3.5 ton and a 2 ton cheapo jack currently.

http://www.samsclub.com/sams/shop/product....equestid=123299

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Torin-Jacks-3-To...o-Jack/14560043

http://www.harborfreightusa.com/usa/itemdi...do?itemid=92782 Their highest lb aluminum jack not their 3,000 cheapie.

20% off coupon in the backs of all Popular Mechanics magazines for Harbor Freight, can ever be used 20% off sales items as long as it is a straight sale item and not a coupon item.

There all made in china for the most part. Anything less than 3 ton jacks are pretty lame in my opinion. No matter what use jacks stands in combination with any floor jack no matter what the brand.

Just use low profile ramps if doing oil changes, way easier. Use Blitz Rhino 12,000 lb (not the 8000lb) plastic ramps from Walmart, one of the few floor ramps I have used that dont slip like many can.

Watch the lifting pad size some can get pretty tiny, my 3.5 ton has a large pad with lips.

P.S. think Sams club still has a lifetime warranty, just keep your receipt. A lot of floor jacks can get a case of the creeps (down) over time even the better end ones.
 

·
Registered
2020 Santa Fe SEL Plus
Joined
·
2,225 Posts
Use jack stands if you get under the car. Never rely on a floor jack. I use the ramps to get under the vehicle to change oil and use the inexpensive floor jacks to rotate the tires never getting underneath the vehicle. I am always to the side of the vehicle and the floor jacks at a 90 degree angle to the vehicle on a level driveway.As each floor jack is only supporting 1/2 of the weight of the vehicle you won't overload the jacks. I never rely on the sissors type jack as they are too unstable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
You only need 2 ton floor stands and jacks for this car. You are usually only supporting a 1/4 of 3200 lbs so 800 lbs at a corner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys. What do you think about this jack? I'm not looking at spending more than 100 and I prefer aluminum since they weigh less.

http://www.amazon.com/Torin-T84020-Aluminu...1701&sr=8-3

I know it's only 1.5 ton, but I'm also only lifting one side of the car. I'm thinking about getting two of these one for each side when I jack the car up for oil changes and tire rotations.

I have to say, those of you who uses ramp are brave. I'm scared I will press the gas too hard and make the car fall off the ramp.

I am also jacking the car up using the jack points mentioned on the service manual. I rigged up a hokey puck to accomodate the lip on the jack points which holds quite well during my first oil change. We borrowed a jack from my aunt but had to return it so I thought I'd buy my own.
 

·
Registered
2020 Santa Fe SEL Plus
Joined
·
2,225 Posts
Well, actually, when you jack up the car you will be supporting more than 1/4 of the weight of the vehicle. More weight is on the front end of the vehicle. You will find that even the rear wheels will start to lift off the pavement to some extent when you lift from the front of the vehicle toward the rear of the jack point. If you lift only from the rear lift point, it would be true that 1/4 or even less of the weight of the vehicle would be on the floor jack. The typical weight distribution is probably about 62/38 front to rear on most front wheel drive vehicles which is 98% of passenger vehicles today.

The important thing to bear in mind is never to get under a car using only floor jacks. I don't even truly trust jack stands unless on perfectly flat surfaces as the weight can shift and disaster results. By using the metal ramps the car isn't going anywhere which is why I use them to change the oil. Tire rotations are no problem because I never get under the car. And that is why I use two of them so I don't have to keep jacking the car up and down using only one jack. The heavy duty garage quality floor jacks are simply too expensive for a home owner to invest in. Of course you can always find the cheap Chinese made jacks but I don't trust their quality for tools. But really the best deal, at least for me, is to take it to the local Hyundai dealer on Wednesdays where I can get a complete oil and filter change for $19.95 and he disposes of the oil and filter. It costs me that much just for the supplies at the local auto parts store. But I prefer to rotate my own tires and check the air pressure and torque the wheel nuts down using a good torque wrench. I don't like those air impact wrenches and even with a very long breaker bar it is very difficult in some cases to break the nuts loose and occasionally will find one that is only finger tight.
 

·
Registered
2020 Santa Fe SEL Plus
Joined
·
2,225 Posts
I would simply go to Wal-Mart and get the 2 ton units for $25 each. They work just fine and take up little space in the garage. Unless you have a garage and do this kind of work you don't really need much more than this. I use the ramps because I have a concrete driveway and a 1 inch rise to stop the ramps from scooting forward. When the wheels are firmly in the depressions, I shut the engine off and set the emergency brake. It isn't going anywhere. I don't exactly trust those plastic jobbies. I am very, very careful to put them on the two metal ramps. I use 2"6" boards at the bottom of the ramp so as not to scrap the facia panel. I actually do this by myself although a friend or relative who can be trusted could position or help the driver to get up the ramps too. Offhand I don't know if these metal ramps are readily available although they can probably be picked up at garage sales or auctions. This plastic crap tends to deteriorate over time but metal seldom does unless it would literally rust through which is unlikely.

I have about $3,000 worth of tools but for this kind of work, having "less" is more. I just pick the jacks up and deposit them in one of the cubby holes in my garage shelving cabinet and they take up very little room. Since they aren't used by every three months or so that's all you really need.

Hockey puck; now that is a very good idea. I've been using wooden blocks to cushion the jack. Where does one go to get those?

QUOTE (SilverNitrate @ Sep 21 2010, 10:16 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=357664
Thanks guys. What do you think about this jack? I'm not looking at spending more than 100 and I prefer aluminum since they weigh less.

http://www.amazon.com/Torin-T84020-Aluminu...1701&sr=8-3

I know it's only 1.5 ton, but I'm also only lifting one side of the car. I'm thinking about getting two of these one for each side when I jack the car up for oil changes and tire rotations.

I have to say, those of you who uses ramp are brave. I'm scared I will press the gas too hard and make the car fall off the ramp.

I am also jacking the car up using the jack points mentioned on the service manual. I rigged up a hokey puck to accomodate the lip on the jack points which holds quite well during my first oil change. We borrowed a jack from my aunt but had to return it so I thought I'd buy my own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
QUOTE (rmissourimule @ Sep 21 2010, 10:21 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=357668
Well, actually, when you jack up the car you will be supporting more than 1/4 of the weight of the vehicle. More weight is on the front end of the vehicle. You will find that even the rear wheels will start to lift off the pavement to some extent when you lift from the front of the vehicle toward the rear of the jack point. If you lift only from the rear lift point, it would be true that 1/4 or even less of the weight of the vehicle would be on the floor jack. The typical weight distribution is probably about 62/38 front to rear on most front wheel drive vehicles which is 98% of passenger vehicles today.

The important thing to bear in mind is never to get under a car using only floor jacks. I don't even truly trust jack stands unless on perfectly flat surfaces as the weight can shift and disaster results. By using the metal ramps the car isn't going anywhere which is why I use them to change the oil. Tire rotations are no problem because I never get under the car. And that is why I use two of them so I don't have to keep jacking the car up and down using only one jack. The heavy duty garage quality floor jacks are simply too expensive for a home owner to invest in. Of course you can always find the cheap Chinese made jacks but I don't trust their quality for tools. But really the best deal, at least for me, is to take it to the local Hyundai dealer on Wednesdays where I can get a complete oil and filter change for $19.95 and he disposes of the oil and filter. It costs me that much just for the supplies at the local auto parts store. But I prefer to rotate my own tires and check the air pressure and torque the wheel nuts down using a good torque wrench. I don't like those air impact wrenches and even with a very long breaker bar it is very difficult in some cases to break the nuts loose and occasionally will find one that is only finger tight.


Until you find out that they did a half-assed job and then you'll never go back again. Several posters from this board it happen to them. For something as simple as an oil change. I'll gladly do it myself and save a headache. :)
 

·
Registered
2020 Santa Fe SEL Plus
Joined
·
2,225 Posts
Why would they do that?

This was the Nagadoches, Texas Hyundai dealer and it is in their computer system. This is not some greasy ragged back lot shade tree operation. If they want my business in the future they had better do it right. I've had many dealers change oil and filters over the years without incident. I would never use these chains or back alley operators. It is a "special" that is offered once a week and they also get an opportunity for other needed maintenance work. They changed out two filters I had neglected and lost no money and kept my goodwill.

QUOTE (OMEGA_WEAPON @ Sep 21 2010, 10:41 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=357673
Until you find out that they did a half-assed job and then you'll never go back again. Several posters from this board it happen to them. For something as simple as an oil change. I'll gladly do it myself and save a headache. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
QUOTE (rmissourimule @ Sep 21 2010, 10:50 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=357677
Why would they do that?

This was the Nagadoches, Texas Hyundai dealer and it is in their computer system. This is not some greasy ragged back lot shade tree operation. If they want my business in the future they had better do it right. I've had many dealers change oil and filters over the years without incident. I would never use these chains or back alley operators. It is a "special" that is offered once a week and they also get an opportunity for other needed maintenance work. They changed out two filters I had neglected and lost no money and kept my goodwill.
In a perfect world this wouldn't happen. You're right if they want your business they would always do it right. Its not always the case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
i bought the hockey pucks on ebay. They work well and very strong.

QUOTE (rmissourimule @ Sep 21 2010, 11:33 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=357671
I would simply go to Wal-Mart and get the 2 ton units for $25 each. They work just fine and take up little space in the garage. Unless you have a garage and do this kind of work you don't really need much more than this. I use the ramps because I have a concrete driveway and a 1 inch rise to stop the ramps from scooting forward. When the wheels are firmly in the depressions, I shut the engine off and set the emergency brake. It isn't going anywhere. I don't exactly trust those plastic jobbies. I am very, very careful to put them on the two metal ramps. I use 2"6" boards at the bottom of the ramp so as not to scrap the facia panel. I actually do this by myself although a friend or relative who can be trusted could position or help the driver to get up the ramps too. Offhand I don't know if these metal ramps are readily available although they can probably be picked up at garage sales or auctions. This plastic crap tends to deteriorate over time but metal seldom does unless it would literally rust through which is unlikely.

I have about $3,000 worth of tools but for this kind of work, having "less" is more. I just pick the jacks up and deposit them in one of the cubby holes in my garage shelving cabinet and they take up very little room. Since they aren't used by every three months or so that's all you really need.

Hockey puck; now that is a very good idea. I've been using wooden blocks to cushion the jack. Where does one go to get those?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
589 Posts
QUOTE (SilverNitrate @ Sep 21 2010, 10:16 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=357664
I have to say, those of you who uses ramp are brave. I'm scared I will press the gas too hard and make the car fall off the ramp.
With an automatic car, it's a piece of cake man. You don't even have to rev the engine past 1,500 rpm or so. And the trick is to have your left foot on the brake and right on the throttle. With FWD, the ramps don't slide, so it's another bonus. With my manual cars, I actually lift the car, then put the ramps underneath. Oh, and before you proceed to drive the car on ramps, always get out of the car with the engine running in 'D' (apply parking brake once the ramps are 'loaded'), get out, and do the final line-up so they're straight. It takes me a minute to put the Sonata on ramps. And I use the 8K-lb plastic rhino ones; nothing wrong with those. They're always inside my garage. Even the best guns are not plastic buddy, so no need to distrust it. Just don't leave them outside year round. Good day.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top