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I just bought a 2018 Elantra and was wondering when I should do my first oil change and should I go right to synthetic? When did you do yours? After the 600 mile break in? after 2500 miles? 7500?
 

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I didn't know the 18 Elantra was out. Is it much different than the 17?

Anyway, my advice on the first oil change would be to give the car an easy break in period. Don't drive it hard for the first 2000 miles then change the oil using only OEM filters always. Use regular oil for the first 10,000 miles following the severe usage schedule. After that you can switch to full synthetic oil and use whatever maintenance schedule you think applies for your driving.
But ALWAYS use OEM filters from the dealer even if you do your own oil changes. They are far superior to anything aftermarket and they're not expensive. If you buy them at the dealer that you bought your Elantra they should give you a 15% discount as well.
 

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Im not sure when they got on the lot but I bought mine Nov 9th. The date on the door tag says it was built Oct 19th. Im not sure of any difference in years to be honest. I got the Value edition in electric blue.

I think im going to have the dealer do the first 3 changes at 2000, 6000, 10,000 and then switch to a full synthetic and go 7500 in between.
 

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I ran factory fill for the first 3000 miles, then have run various full synthetics since then. Never have used the OEM filter, as the Fram Ultra filter has much better filtration numbers at only a dollar or two more. Do not buy into the OEM filter stuff. There's nothing special about it and it has rather poor efficiency ratings. I believe the numbers are 99% at 50 microns, but around 50% at 20 microns. The Fram Ultra is 99% at 20 microns. Mine doesn't burn a drop and it is really quiet at start up. I'll hit 15,000 miles on it sometime this week.
 

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Still in the dark about breakin oil, been this way since day one, replace it to quick and end up with an oil burner. Owners manual states never to drive at a constant speed, this leaves off highway driving and will get rear ended by a dump truck. So the first 500 miles was driven mostly in town, sure can't drive at a constant speed in town.

Considered this severe driving so did the first change at 3,750, only use SAE grade SN, been using Quaker State for years, so stuck with this, so called, Ultimate, but still look for grade SN.

Nobody gave me a better deal on filters than my dealer, so purchased a bag of eight, also got free drain plug washers, still have half a dozen left. Do a lot more highway driving, still looks good at 7,500 miles, but dealer tells me to change it 7,499.9 to maintain my ten year warranty, so do comply.
 

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....Do not buy into the OEM filter stuff. There's nothing special about it and it has rather poor efficiency ratings....
Not sure where you're getting that info but I disagree with your statement. The OEM filters are very good quality. Fram makes super cheap entry level filters that are total crap. Sure they have higher end filters but there's no evidence I've seen that it's better than Hyundai OEM.
Besides... If you're doing you're own oil changes and use OEM at least you have dealer record proving that you're buying filters for your car. Hyundai is not specific about that brand oil as long as it's SN GF-5 rated.
 

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I didn't know the 18 Elantra was out. Is it much different than the 17?

Anyway, my advice on the first oil change would be to give the car an easy break in period. Don't drive it hard for the first 2000 miles then change the oil using only OEM filters always. Use regular oil for the first 10,000 miles following the severe usage schedule. After that you can switch to full synthetic oil and use whatever maintenance schedule you think applies for your driving.
But ALWAYS use OEM filters from the dealer even if you do your own oil changes. They are far superior to anything aftermarket and they're not expensive. If you buy them at the dealer that you bought your Elantra they should give you a 15% discount as well.
Some of your statements appear to be based off opinion, which I’m left wondering why you recommend the above? This is a first I’ve heard anyone (be it a forum...anywhere) with the above advice.

Odd how you base an idea around ‘always’ using the OEM filter, yet give advice based on the opposite of the car manual oil change interval.

Im not sure when they got on the lot but I bought mine Nov 9th. The date on the door tag says it was built Oct 19th. Im not sure of any difference in years to be honest. I got the Value edition in electric blue.

I think im going to have the dealer do the first 3 changes at 2000, 6000, 10,000 and then switch to a full synthetic and go 7500 in between.
The end of July was the moment the dealerships were hidding a few select Elantra 2018s in their backlots. I wanted to see the newly redesigned 2018 Sonata at the time when the dealer informed me there were 2018 Elantras on their lot. I purchased my 2018 Elantra Sport model back in early August.

Read your owners manual as to the oil change intervals. You’re wasting your money/time with the 6k and 10k future plan.

I ran factory fill for the first 3000 miles, then have run various full synthetics since then. Never have used the OEM filter, as the Fram Ultra filter has much better filtration numbers at only a dollar or two more. Do not buy into the OEM filter stuff. There's nothing special about it and it has rather poor efficiency ratings. I believe the numbers are 99% at 50 microns, but around 50% at 20 microns. The Fram Ultra is 99% at 20 microns. Mine doesn't burn a drop and it is really quiet at start up. I'll hit 15,000 miles on it sometime this week.
I dumped whatever crap oil Hyundai put into my car after the break in period. Sweet reply with the technical info with the specs of the OEM...which I agree with. Aftermarket filters are better when a consumer spends a few bucks more on a quality product. I tend to stay away from the oil threads as they always run into endless discussions.

Not sure where you're getting that info but I disagree with your statement. The OEM filters are very good quality. Fram makes super cheap entry level filters that are total crap. Sure they have higher end filters but there's no evidence I've seen that it's better than Hyundai OEM.
Besides... If you're doing you're own oil changes and use OEM at least you have dealer record proving that you're buying filters for your car. Hyundai is not specific about that brand oil as long as it's SN GF-5 rated.
While I’ll agree the OEM filter is a ‘good’ filter...there’s far better on the market when going aftermarket. I’ll agree with your other mention by going with OEM is playing it safe in terms of any possible warranty issues arising from the engine, but it’s so unlikely while using a quality product moreover the OEM filter.
 

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2017 Owner here. Did my first oil change at the 3750 mile mark myself. Used Hyundai recommendation and OEM specs so was an OEM oil filter, crush washer and QuakerState Full Synthetic oil.

I would stick to what the user manual says and base that on your driving. Is this extreme or normal. If normal, do the 7500 interval. I am sticking to the extreme driving condition as I do 40 miles a day in atlanta traffic.

Look now on Quaker State's website as they have good deals and an oil change, fully synthetic, when using OEM filter will be less than $20.

As for the above discussion on the filter. OEM in terms of warranty is the best way to play it safe.
 

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Opinions are all anecdotal, just based on board participants and what they believe has worked for them in the past. (and what has worked in the past is not necessarily correct in today's world with manufacturing techniques and new oils).

For what it is worth, IMO, go the 3000 or so on the factory fill and switch to synthetics (what ever is on sale will do just fine) coupled with a reasonable oil change schedule and the engine will outlast the rest of the vehicle. Even conventional oil will do that. Filters, OEM are relativley cheap to buy and will do the trick for the life of the engine. May or may not be the best but it is always a battle between flow versus filtration but in the long run it does not make a hill of beans difference in longevity.
 

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Don't forget Pennzoil has $2/qt mail-in cash rebate on up to 24 qts of its synthetics for purchases made through the end of 2017. That puts Walmart's 5 qt jugs at under $3/qt. Not bad.
 

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I didn't know the 18 Elantra was out. Is it much different than the 17?

Anyway, my advice on the first oil change would be to give the car an easy break in period. Don't drive it hard for the first 2000 miles then change the oil using only OEM filters always. Use regular oil for the first 10,000 miles following the severe usage schedule. After that you can switch to full synthetic oil and use whatever maintenance schedule you think applies for your driving.
But ALWAYS use OEM filters from the dealer even if you do your own oil changes. They are far superior to anything aftermarket and they're not expensive. If you buy them at the dealer that you bought your Elantra they should give you a 15% discount as well.
Some of your statements appear to be based off opinion, which I?m left wondering why you recommend the above? This is a first I?ve heard anyone (be it a forum...anywhere) with the above advice.

Odd how you base an idea around ?always? using the OEM filter, yet give advice based on the opposite of the car manual oil change interval.

Im not sure when they got on the lot but I bought mine Nov 9th. The date on the door tag says it was built Oct 19th. Im not sure of any difference in years to be honest. I got the Value edition in electric blue.

I think im going to have the dealer do the first 3 changes at 2000, 6000, 10,000 and then switch to a full synthetic and go 7500 in between.
The end of July was the moment the dealerships were hidding a few select Elantra 2018s in their backlots. I wanted to see the newly redesigned 2018 Sonata at the time when the dealer informed me there were 2018 Elantras on their lot. I purchased my 2018 Elantra Sport model back in early August.

Read your owners manual as to the oil change intervals. You?re wasting your money/time with the 6k and 10k future plan.

I ran factory fill for the first 3000 miles, then have run various full synthetics since then. Never have used the OEM filter, as the Fram Ultra filter has much better filtration numbers at only a dollar or two more. Do not buy into the OEM filter stuff. There's nothing special about it and it has rather poor efficiency ratings. I believe the numbers are 99% at 50 microns, but around 50% at 20 microns. The Fram Ultra is 99% at 20 microns. Mine doesn't burn a drop and it is really quiet at start up. I'll hit 15,000 miles on it sometime this week.
I dumped whatever crap oil Hyundai put into my car after the break in period. Sweet reply with the technical info with the specs of the OEM...which I agree with. Aftermarket filters are better when a consumer spends a few bucks more on a quality product. I tend to stay away from the oil threads as they always run into endless discussions.

Not sure where you're getting that info but I disagree with your statement. The OEM filters are very good quality. Fram makes super cheap entry level filters that are total crap. Sure they have higher end filters but there's no evidence I've seen that it's better than Hyundai OEM.
Besides... If you're doing you're own oil changes and use OEM at least you have dealer record proving that you're buying filters for your car. Hyundai is not specific about that brand oil as long as it's SN GF-5 rated.
While I?ll agree the OEM filter is a ?good? filter...there?s far better on the market when going aftermarket. I?ll agree with your other mention by going with OEM is playing it safe in terms of any possible warranty issues arising from the engine, but it?s so unlikely while using a quality product moreover the OEM filter.
Of course it's our opinions. That's what the guy was asking for.

But now that you've chimed in with the wisdom of the universe please enlighten us.... lol
 

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Here's my two cents. If you're even remotely close to getting an oil change anywhere near the manufacturer's recommended schedule, I don't care what brand you're using, or whether its OEM or not, you're going to prolong the life of the engine beyond the life of the rest of the car. A modern Hyundai Elantra is built to be a cheap, disposable vehicle. It wasn't designed to ever run much more past 100,000 miles. Any mileage you get beyond that, frankly is on God's grace lol. This ain't your grandpappy's indestructible tank on wheels. It's a cheaply built consumer car literally designed to progressively and predictably fail. If you want a vehicle designed to last forever so long as it is well taken care of, frankly, you need a time machine.
 

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...It's a cheaply built consumer car literally designed to progressively and predictably fail. If you want a vehicle designed to last forever so long as it is well taken care of, frankly, you need a time machine.
I would be very interested to know, if it is designed to progressively and predictably fail, what are the areas in which it is designed to fail? Sounds like a very cynical post.
 

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EPA has a bug on fluids, about a pint or so with hydraulic power steering that normally last for the life of the vehicle, but that has to go, so now have electrical power steering, ha, with limited lubricated ball bearings and joints.

Safe the wrecking yards from trying to recapture it.

Neck in line was getting rid of the fluid in brakes, electric brakes, also has to be drained in recycling. Was around 1998, electrical guys wanted 12 volts, the brake guys wanted 48 volts. Filaments in bulbs would be way to thin at 48 volts and the current would be in the hundreds of amperes in the brakes, so had me design a dual 12/48 volt alternator.

But the guys could not get the brakes to work so the project was dropped. I still got paid.

So here we are talking about maybe a quart of fluids that are infrequently changed and not that bad to recover. But not a word about engine oil where hundreds and thousands of gallons every year. This is how dump the EPA is, no engineers, just politicians.

Then what about the life of our vehicles? Made intentionally poor for frequent replacement, also get banged up easily. Replacement parts are extremely expensive along with labor, get rid of the darn thing and get a new one.

Just an perspective of an old engineer.
 
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