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I was driving through a 4-way street intersection turning left when the vehicle began making a knocking sound from the engine, then stalled in the middle of the road. All lights on the dash illuminated. Upon getting the vehicle to restart, it would not go over 2000 RPMs. The vehicle continued to make a loud low sounding knock from the engine. Being close to home, I was able to drive slowly, mostly in a shoulder, to my home.

Doing some research I discovered this model vehicle was subject to a Recall due to failing connecting rod bearings. I called my local Hyundai dealership to ask about the repair, in which I was told the repair would cost $4,000-$6,000 for an engine replacement. The Recall covered vehicles up to 120,000 miles, my vehicle has 127,000. I was denied the Recall.

I then called around to local mechanics but none of them, not one, would attempt to replace the faulty connecting rod bearings.

I decided to take on the repair myself which Hyundai told me was impossible. I managed to remove the oil pan, oil pump, and finally the faulty connecting rod bearings which showed major scaring and damage. My oil pan was full of metal shavings.

I contacted my local dealer, also Hyundai Corporate and after both looked up my VIN number, neither could tell me WHAT BEARINGS WERE INSIDE MY ENGINE. Their parts system comes back with 5 options for the bearings.

Frustratingly I contacted the local dealer again telling them I will bring the old bearings to them (riding public transportation) but they said they have no way of measuring the part or telling me which part they used. The dealer and corporate both, told me TO TOW MY VEHICLE TO A 3RD PARTY MECHANIC to measure the bearings, then tow my car back home, then give Hyundai the measurement to get a part number. Hyundai does not know what connecting rod bearings were used in the 2.4L engine!

Can anyone help me figure out, what the STOCK connecting rod bearing PART NUMBER was for the 2014 Santa Fe Sport Base 2.4L?
 

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I was driving through a 4-way street intersection turning left when the vehicle began making a knocking sound from the engine, then stalled in the middle of the road. All lights on the dash illuminated. Upon getting the vehicle to restart, it would not go over 2000 RPMs. The vehicle continued to make a loud low sounding knock from the engine. Being close to home, I was able to drive slowly, mostly in a shoulder, to my home.

Doing some research I discovered this model vehicle was subject to a Recall due to failing connecting rod bearings. I called my local Hyundai dealership to ask about the repair, in which I was told the repair would cost $4,000-$6,000 for an engine replacement. The Recall covered vehicles up to 120,000 miles, my vehicle has 127,000. I was denied the Recall.

I then called around to local mechanics but none of them, not one, would attempt to replace the faulty connecting rod bearings.

I decided to take on the repair myself which Hyundai told me was impossible. I managed to remove the oil pan, oil pump, and finally the faulty connecting rod bearings which showed major scaring and damage. My oil pan was full of metal shavings.

I contacted my local dealer, also Hyundai Corporate and after both looked up my VIN number, neither could tell me WHAT BEARINGS WERE INSIDE MY ENGINE. Their parts system comes back with 5 options for the bearings.

Frustratingly I contacted the local dealer again telling them I will bring the old bearings to them (riding public transportation) but they said they have no way of measuring the part or telling me which part they used. The dealer and corporate both, told me TO TOW MY VEHICLE TO A 3RD PARTY MECHANIC to measure the bearings, then tow my car back home, then give Hyundai the measurement to get a part number. Hyundai does not know what connecting rod bearings were used in the 2.4L engine!

Can anyone help me figure out, what the STOCK connecting rod bearing PART NUMBER was for the 2014 Santa Fe Sport Base 2.4L?

Any update on this issue? I have a 2014 Santa Fe with 3.3L. I noticed I have had to add oil to the vehicle in between oil changes. No check engine light or any low oil lights. Now I hear a slight knock on the lower engine. Have you had success with replacing the connecting rod bearings?
 

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Any update on this issue? I have a 2014 Santa Fe with 3.3L. I noticed I have had to add oil to the vehicle in between oil changes. No check engine light or any low oil lights. Now I hear a slight knock on the lower engine. Have you had success with replacing the connecting rod bearings?
With almost three years having passed - by someone with only (1) post count, the incident probably never happened.

Trip777
 

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Have you had success with replacing the connecting rod bearings?
When rod bearings fail in an engine there's far more to do than simply replace the bad bearings.
Metal shavings often get circulated throughout the engine, damaging crankshaft, other bearings, oil pump, cylinder walls and pistons.
 
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