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Tried my i20 in the snow to see how the ESP performs. While it appears to work, if you pull off with a bit of power, the ESP light flashes on/off rapidily & wheel spin is reduced as the power is reduced. But it isn't as effective as I thought it would be. I've seen a fifthgear video on youtube, where there appeared to be no wheelspin at all, but my i20 still does spin a little. Also after pulling off, if I slowly increase the speed once it's rolling, it appears to spin & the ESP doesn't come in. Is this the case with all i20's, am I expecting too much? This is on very slippery snow/ice BTW.
 

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Cold and lots of snow here in Sweden, so good time for a test of the ESP-system here as well !
To me it seems the ESP-system is not really ment to reduce spinning totally but ensure that (up to a limit !!) the car can be directed by the steeringwheel and go in whatever direction without loosing front or rear end and end up in an uncontrollable situation.
And as such the i20 ESP works just as intended. It IS possible to do a roundabout in much higher speed safe and secure with it .
Disabling the system gave severe understeer in the snow when doing sharp cornering at speed...
Actually it was the best in a huge test in the leading Auto-mag over here with safe 75km/h thru the standardised cones. And that was "worst case" with 4 people and max load. It is the so called "elk-test ".

What dissapoints me a bit is that it is impossible to keep the rear window clear on dirty / icy roads for more than a few minutes. Had the rear spoiler fitted 3 weeks ago. It helps a bit,but not so much as expected. And as noted in another thread ; If there is one car that needs automatic on the rear wiper it is the i20 !! But all in all a very good winters car when the going gets tough.
 

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QUOTE (Scandinavia @ Nov 28 2010, 03:38 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=375343
Cold and lots of snow here in Sweden, so good time for a test of the ESP-system here as well !
To me it seems the ESP-system is not really ment to reduce spinning totally but ensure that (up to a limit !!) the car can be directed by the steeringwheel and go in whatever direction without loosing front or rear end and end up in an uncontrollable situation.
And as such the i20 ESP works just as intended. It IS possible to do a roundabout in much higher speed safe and secure with it .
Disabling the system gave severe understeer in the snow when doing sharp cornering at speed...
Actually it was the best in a huge test in the leading Auto-mag over here with safe 75km/h thru the standardised cones. And that was "worst case" with 4 people and max load. It is the so called "elk-test ".

What dissapoints me a bit is that it is impossible to keep the rear window clear on dirty / icy roads for more than a few minutes. Had the rear spoiler fitted 3 weeks ago. It helps a bit,but not so much as expected. And as noted in another thread ; If there is one car that needs automatic on the rear wiper it is the i20 !! But all in all a very good winters car when the going gets tough.

Funny you say that, I find my rear window stays much less dirty without a spoiler.
All my previous cars have had rear spoilers, and they were always filthy.
My wifes Amica has a spoiler, and we are forever washing and wiping it, yet the i20 seems much better without one.
As for the ESP, I haven't ventured out in the snow with it yet, but I noticed the other day as I was pulling out at a junction, that the front wheels both started spinning on a damp tarmac surface.
Steering wasn't affected as you point out, but I was surprised how much spin took place, I would have thought ESP would have controlled this. ?
S.
 

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QUOTE (rodderstrotter @ Nov 27 2010, 01:26 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=375048
Tried my i20 in the snow to see how the ESP performs. While it appears to work, if you pull off with a bit of power, the ESP light flashes on/off rapidily & wheel spin is reduced as the power is reduced. But it isn't as effective as I thought it would be. I've seen a fifthgear video on youtube, where there appeared to be no wheelspin at all, but my i20 still does spin a little. Also after pulling off, if I slowly increase the speed once it's rolling, it appears to spin & the ESP doesn't come in. Is this the case with all i20's, am I expecting too much? This is on very slippery snow/ice BTW.
Exactly the same thing happened to me this morning - going uphill on about 1" of fresh snow.
My preferred method is to switch off the ESP and start off in second gear.


Lester...
 

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Thank heavens all the snow has gone, from my area of the UK anyway. I do a lot of driving around Brighton, and its many hills, and Ive found the traction on slippery surfaces is very poor. Its probably one of the worst cars for traction on snowy/icy surfaces Ive ever owned :(, ESP helps but watching other (non 4 wheel drive) cars going up hills that I cant is a real bummer.
 

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Hi guys just to add a few things...i think some of you are getting confused between traction control and electronic skid protection (esp)... ESP will never stop wheel spin as such. Its purpose is to do what it says on the tin....protect the car from skidding whilst already moving how i accomplishes this is using the ABS system to rapidly brake and unbrake the individual wheels hundrerds of times per second with the aid of a dedicated CPU...this has the effect of limit the skid of the car before it totally brakes grip with the road surface and therfore reducing the severity or even compeltley removing the chance of a skid in some instances.

Traction control (which i gather is what some of you guys are getting confused with) is and engine management tractions system which uses a specialised computer to aid traction to individual wheels elimiating wheel spin. It does this with clever electronics and transmission gadgets, what it does is control the amount of power going to each individual wheel RATHER than waiting for wheel to loose traction and then brake it manual as in ESP. So the computer senses which wheel is loosing traction and which other wheels have msot grip it will then transfer the power from the wheel thats loosing grip to the wheel with most grip to balance out and stop the wheelspin it does this hundereds of times per second again on the good systems.

You only normally find traction control otherwise known as (TCS) not to get confused with (ESP) on fast sports cars as standard where putting the power down onto the road is of most importance in high horse power cars.

Prime example of where ESP would be used as mentioned already is a wet round about so your turning a hard lock on the steering wheel putting the power down to much the car starts to steer wide (understeer) you would feel the steering go light to the touch as the wheels are no longer in grip.. the ESP will then brake the wheels to prevent the skid (understeer) getting worse. Also the same for wet slipper corners and roads with a greesey surfaces which seem to cause the most common accidents i.e. people driving to fats for the conditions.

Hope my ramblings have helped explain the system a bit better.
 
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