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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2011 Sonata GLS purchased in June, and in Denver the cold has finally arrived.
When warm the engine temp gauge hits the normal mark of one bar off of the middle in 8-10 minutes, and that is on warm days or out of my garage on a cold day.
Leaving the car in an open parking gargage is a different story. The gauge for the most part stood at three bars and did hit four, but stayed at three for most of the trip home finally finding its normal position at 18 minutes later just one bar off center. Temp in the garage at work was at 40 degrees and outside was 34; pretty close to that yesterday.
The heat seems to work just fine, but the idle sits at 750 until the engine temp gauge hits its normal position and then the tac goes where it normally does at 625.
I have not see any of my cars even on days where the temps did not make it out of the teens take almsot twenty minutes to fully warm up; is this GDI engine a panzy in the cold temps?
 

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QUOTE (gbavero @ Nov 11 2010, 07:48 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=370988
2011 Sonata GLS purchased in June, and in Denver the cold has finally arrived.
When warm the engine temp gauge hits the normal mark of one bar off of the middle in 8-10 minutes, and that is on warm days or out of my garage.
Leaving the car in an open parking gargage is a different story. The gauge for the most part stood at three bars and did hit four, but stayed at three for most of of trip home finally finding its normal position at 18 minutes later. Temp in the garage at work was at 40 degrees and outside was 34; pretty close to that yesterday.
The heat seems to work just fine, but the idle sits at 750 until the engine temp gauge hits its normal position and then the tac goes where it normally does at 625.
I have not see any of my cars even on days where the temps did not make it out of the teens take almsot twenty minutes to fully warm up; is this GDI engine a panzy in the cold temps?

People are usually complaining about cars running too hot, so this is a new one to me anyway. Without knowing what the markings on the gauge really translate to, its impossible to make any judgments about whether the car is hitting normal operating temperature. that would be between 190-210 deg F, generally. A non-contact thermometer aimed at the top coolant hose would be a good way to check.
 

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QUOTE (gbavero @ Nov 11 2010, 07:48 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=370988
2011 Sonata GLS purchased in June, and in Denver the cold has finally arrived.
When warm the engine temp gauge hits the normal mark of one bar off of the middle in 8-10 minutes, and that is on warm days or out of my garage on a cold day.
Leaving the car in an open parking gargage is a different story. The gauge for the most part stood at three bars and did hit four, but stayed at three for most of the trip home finally finding its normal position at 18 minutes later just one bar off center. Temp in the garage at work was at 40 degrees and outside was 34; pretty close to that yesterday.
The heat seems to work just fine, but the idle sits at 750 until the engine temp gauge hits its normal position and then the tac goes where it normally does at 625.
I have not see any of my cars even on days where the temps did not make it out of the teens take almsot twenty minutes to fully warm up; is this GDI engine a panzy in the cold temps?
My GLS has been exhibiting the same behavior as the temperature gets colder. It was in the high 30's, low 40's the past few mornings here and the temperature gauge was noticeably slower to reach normal range. On warmer mornings (50 degrees or warmer), the gauge would reach the normal range in about 10 minutes. On colder mornings, it has been taking closer to 15 minutes.

Any engine will take longer in cold temperatures to reach normal operating temperature. However I do have some mild concern as to how this engine will operate when temperatures get down in the teens and single digits during cold spells this Winter. I vaguely recall reading somewhere that gasoline direct injection engines sometimes have a difficult time dealing with really cold temps until the engine reaches normal operating temp. It will be interesting to see how Hyundai's GDi engine handles the Winter months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for agreeing with me, and for not thinking that I am crazy. Not to worried about coming out of my warn garage ona cold morning, but instead leaving work on those very cold days. This is the first car that I dealt with the weirdness of the engine taking longer in 40 temps to take longer to heat up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just kind of weird seeing the bars on the gauge bounce around a bit. Comng out of a 52 degree garage this morning into an outside temp of 26 the barts hit their normal operating range in 7 minutes, but once through my 30 minute drive to work it went down a bar, but then back up.
Yesterday the parking garage was at 40 degrees and the outside temp was at 34 and that is when it took a while for the engine to warm up, but at the least the heat does not seem affected.
 

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QUOTE (gbavero @ Nov 12 2010, 10:20 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=371105
Just kind of weird seeing the bars on the gauge bounce around a bit. Comng out of a 52 degree garage this morning into an outside temp of 26 the barts hit their normal operating range in 7 minutes, but once through my 30 minute drive to work it went down a bar, but then back up.
Yesterday the parking garage was at 40 degrees and the outside temp was at 34 and that is when it took a while for the engine to warm up, but at the least the heat does not seem affected.

One thing to keep in mind is that most car brands use an electronic buffer to basically fake the reading for the driver. The above reactions to what is apparently an actual temperature reading is why its done that way. in their own circle, BMWs are famous for this fake BS which angers some of their more hard-core fans who would like an "honest" reading. Honesty, apparently, just gets you a lot of people wondering why the temperature fluctuates with ambient with subsequent calls to the dealer, etc.

Now for a GDI engine, the operating range may extend down further since most of the reason why you need at least 190degrees on a "normal" engine is to ensure adequate fuel atomization. DI engines have all the atomization they need in the form of fuel pressures hitting the injectors north of 2000psi. For this reason, Hyundai may have a lower-spec thermostat which will in fact let the engine run cooler when it is colder outside. This should be welcomed since a cooler engine = cooler intake air = more oxygen in the mix = more power.

Also keep in mind that on anything approaching a typical sub-70-degree morning, there is no way to warm up a car in less than 20 minutes anyway. If you are not driving at least 20 minutes to work (or wherever), you are leaving water in the form of condensation in the engine. water+engine = poison.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for the GDI Education robspeedGLS because not having one of these engines in my 24 years worth of driving has thrown me for a loop to be honest with you.
 
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