Hyundai Forums banner

21 - 39 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,427 Posts
This is a VERY subjective item.

Subjective because everyone's driving habits are different. In this case a lighter footed driver or one who uses cruise control is more likely to notice it.

Subjective because some drivers would just never even notice it while others may key into in and then feel it every time.

Subjective because road conditions / grades also come into play. It might never be noticed in flat or very hilly terrain.

This being said without driving this particular vehicle it is hard to say if it is normal or not. I tend to lean towards it being normal. I can produce it in my 2.4L at will. I have not tried it in my wife's long body as I do not drive that vehicle often. Keep in mind that these transmissions are adaptive towards how an individual uses them. Also keep in mind that the manufacturers are striving towards fuel economy if not being forced in that direction by our government, so a slight chuggle as a trade off for another .5 MPG may be considered as acceptable to them.

Also should have mentioned....If you have the ECO option and are using it, go back to normal. If you are in normal you can switch to sport mode (If you have that option) and that will force downshifts earlier. It will also hold upshifts and reduce your fuel economy....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
With respect, I disagree. No other vehicle I have ever owned has had this problem. It feels like the engine is misfiring. If Hyundai thought that was a good compromise for a barely measurable gain in fuel economy, then Hyundai isn't the brand for me. They've decided that drivability is second to fuel economy and that's not acceptable to me. The government does impose fuel standards, but Hyundai is way ahead of the likes of Ford, GM and Chrysler so I don't buy that argument either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
Just a quick update post Pedal Commander. I will say that the PC does noticeably affect throttle response and, thus, engine transmission gear changes, depending on the setting. It hasn't quite done the job of masking the "chuggle" issue I have been bemoaning in earlier posts, but it has helped a tiny bit in certain circumstances. The biggest gain has been the more responsive throttle from stops and low speeds. I have to retrain my foot and brain to adjust. I am currently experimenting with Sport -3 and -4 mode. If anyone is interested, I ordered model PC17. Actually, the first one I ordered was model PC71, but it was wrong (incorrect connector); they then send me PC17, so I suspect they just got the numbers transposed on their website. The correct model is PC17.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Maybe it is my driving style, but I do not have this Chuggle issue. I live in a hilly area as well. I think I am a pretty heavy footed driver and I average 21.5mpg between freeway and city. I have seen 26+ while on highway. That said, since reading this issue, I have tried to be light on the throttle going up hills, using Eco mode and other items. I cannot reproduce what is being described. Frankly, if my car did this, I would either make them fix it, lemon law it, or sell it. Mine does not do this, so I am not convinced it is inherent to the Santa Fe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
To be clear, I haven't tried duplicating the issue in Eco mode, but I can do it in Normal and Sport mode. All you have to do is go up a significant hill, allow engine RPMs to drop to below 1500 and start to slowly apply throttle. As you do this, the engine starts to load and the transmission refuses to downshift. It is during this time the engine and/or transmissions will act like they are hesitating and it feels like an engine misfire. I have been told by two different dealerships that this issue is normal. That's BS, of course. They don't know what to do about it and Hyundai isn't offering any support. I have already submitted a lemon law request to Hyundai on other issues that haven't been resolved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
To be clear, I haven't tried duplicating the issue in Eco mode, but I can do it in Normal and Sport mode. All you have to do is go up a significant hill, allow engine RPMs to drop to below 1500 and start to slowly apply throttle. As you do this, the engine starts to load and the transmission refuses to downshift. It is during this time the engine and/or transmissions will act like they are hesitating and it feels like an engine misfire. I have been told by two different dealerships that this issue is normal. That's BS, of course. They don't know what to do about it and Hyundai isn't offering any support. I have already submitted a lemon law request to Hyundai on other issues that haven't been resolved.
As I said, I live in a hilly area. My Santa Fe will not do this. I tried to do exactly this coming home following reading your post. My transmission drops the gear as soon as I try to apply any throttle.

I will try this again on various hills tomorrow near my house and then report back if I can reproduce this issue or not.

I would certainly not accept it, that is for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
As I said, I live in a hilly area. My Santa Fe will not do this. I tried to do exactly this coming home following reading your post. My transmission drops the gear as soon as I try to apply any throttle.

I will try this again on various hills tomorrow near my house and then report back if I can reproduce this issue or not.

I would certainly not accept it, that is for sure.
What is the year of your Santa Fe?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,427 Posts
I cannot see the vehicle doing this as normal is sport mode. That just does not add up. You would pretty much have to be trying to provoke it into doing it for it to not downshift in sport mode.

Keep in mind that many States' Lemon Laws do allow for depreciation for use, so depending on how many miles you have on the vehicle...You will not necessarily receive a free vehicle. As far as any future warranty repairs, by adding that device you have now modified the vehicle and it would have to be removed for any further diagnostics.

Folks, the diagnostics used by any manufacturer assume that the vehicle is in stock condition. Once you modify it with devices like this, test results are no longer valid. I understand why the OP tried it and I am not chastising him. This is just for awareness purposes.

Although these transmissions are adaptive, I would ask you dealer to see if he has a similarly equipped model and ask to drive that. If it acts the same way then there may not be any repair available unless a software update is released, and those are often dependent on meeting federal requirements so they take time IF they can even be done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
For the record, the Pedal Commander does not modify anything in the vehicle's code or flash. It simply plugs in between the pedal and ECU. You unplug the pedal, plug this in and plug the vehicle wiring harness into the other side of this device. All it does is modify the response curve of the drive-by-wire throttle pedal. Once removed, which is as simple as unplugging it, there is no evidence it was ever installed.

Now, it is possible to reset the adaptable systems in the ECU/TCU in the Santa Fe. That is something I plan to try and have the vehicle learn from me. When I got the vehicle, it had about 200 miles on it, so it learned from someone else initially. Perhaps this will help.

I really do like many aspects of this vehicle, including the transmission (aside from the stutter/chuggle/hesitation issue I have been discussing), so I don't want to go through a buyback because, frankly, I am out of alternatives. If I explained to everyone what I have been through the past year buying cars (plural), it would leave your mouths agape. I just want it to be over and I want to be happy with this vehicle, but it's not quite there. I have a problem spending over $45k on a vehicle and having stupid transmission problems like I am having, especially when apparently I am the only one having a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
I am the only one having a problem
I'm quite certain that I have what you've been describing, just not as strong. That or my mind is filtering it out.

It's not a problem to me, but I could definitely see how this can be a deal-breaker for some.

Good luck, and be careful with that gadget you have there. I wouldn't want it to be stuck sending a "full throttle" signal!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #33
I'm quite certain that I have what you've been describing, just not as strong. That or my mind is filtering it out.

It's not a problem to me, but I could definitely see how this can be a deal-breaker for some.

Good luck, and be careful with that gadget you have there. I wouldn't want it to be stuck sending a "full throttle" signal!
I am scheduled to test drive a 2018 Santa Fe 3-row next week to compare against. I am wondering if this was a tuning thing from 2018 to 2019 or maybe they are both like this. I am also having the adaptables reset for the ECU/TCU by the dealership to see if that helps.

As far as the Pedal Commander is concerned, many, many people use them and I haven't seen any reports of full throttle signals being sent. That being said, it is a fair item to think about and be aware of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
To be clear, I haven't tried duplicating the issue in Eco mode, but I can do it in Normal and Sport mode. All you have to do is go up a significant hill, allow engine RPMs to drop to below 1500 and start to slowly apply throttle. As you do this, the engine starts to load and the transmission refuses to downshift. It is during this time the engine and/or transmissions will act like they are hesitating and it feels like an engine misfire. I have been told by two different dealerships that this issue is normal. That's BS, of course. They don't know what to do about it and Hyundai isn't offering any support. I have already submitted a lemon law request to Hyundai on other issues that haven't been resolved.
So I drove my Santa Fe today on various flat and hills and at varying throttle positions and speeds and gears. I even used the manual mode to lock the transmission into a taller gear and then lug the engine. I cannot reproduce this issue. As soon as my car would start to lug the engine, the transmission smoothly downshifts to a lower gear. When I load the engine at lower RPM in manual mode it just smoothly pulls - but slow to gain any speed. I live in North San Diego County where we have many small and large hills. I tried for nearly 30 minutes and cannot get this "Chuggle" that is described. I also took out our 2017 Chrysler Pacifica and tried this method - it too is smooth on throttle from tip in until you slowly push and before the engine lugs much, it drops to a lower gear. The Pacifica doesn’t allow for locking into a lower gear through manual selection.

I just cannot reproduce it. That said - if I had this issue as you describe it, I would want it corrected or would likely dump the car.

My Santa Fe is 2018 AWD and the XL variety.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #35
Thank you very much for trying. I am beginning to suspect it is a programming change from 2018 to 2019 that was for the worse. I am planning on testing a 2018 Santa Fe on Tuesday to see if I can get it to happen with that one. I will of course report back with my findings.

I did receive an offer today from Hyundai to buyback my Santa Fe. Trouble is I literally have no clue what I'd replace it with. I have owned or tested 40 different cars over the past year, from SUVs, to trucks and sedans. Most of them failed the butt test (comfort) and we're quickly eliminated. The Santa Fe was the last one that seemed to hit the important points for me. I test drove two different ones for over 100 miles before making a buying decision. It's not like I didn't thoroughly test the vehicle, but some things didn't become apparent until several thousand miles into ownership.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Thank you very much for trying. I am beginning to suspect it is a programming change from 2018 to 2019 that was for the worse. I am planning on testing a 2018 Santa Fe on Tuesday to see if I can get it to happen with that one. I will of course report back with my findings.

I did receive an offer today from Hyundai to buyback my Santa Fe. Trouble is I literally have no clue what I'd replace it with. I have owned or tested 40 different cars over the past year, from SUVs, to trucks and sedans. Most of them failed the butt test (comfort) and we're quickly eliminated. The Santa Fe was the last one that seemed to hit the important points for me. I test drove two different ones for over 100 miles before making a buying decision. It's not like I didn't thoroughly test the vehicle, but some things didn't become apparent until several thousand miles into ownership.
I hope you can get it worked out. Wonder if they made some calibration change from 2018 to 19 that didn’t help drivability. But why would they? The vehicle is the same I think from basically 2013 with a facelift in 2017. Since the Palisade came out, the 19 Santa Fe didn’t get any updates that I am aware of.

The only two issues I have had with my 2018 are:
1) the front rotors warped and caused brake judder. This seemed to start when the car was new. It worked by 6k miles. I never took it in. By 13000 miles it was terrible. I changed the front pads and rotors to a quality aftermarket at it’s smoother than it ever has been since new.

2) the rear springs are too soft. This is a known issue. I decided to go the way of a few others here and am installing Eihbach springs.

Otherwise I really like the car. It’s been solid for me and is comfortable. I have been eying a new Telluride, but since my Santa Fe has no payment, it is hard to trade now. The value is lower since the Palisade came out.

Hope you can get yours figured out. Good luck and let us know what happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
All you have to do is go up a significant hill, allow engine RPMs to drop to below 1500 and start to slowly apply throttle.
I think the key is slow throttle movement.
My Tucson also is reluctant to downshift if the throttle is changed slowly.
Quickly move the throttle to about halfway and it's a different story.
 
21 - 39 of 39 Posts
Top