Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

It is a 2003 Santa Fe V6 2.7L.

In the morning, when I start the vehicle, it runs roughly. Like it is missing on a cylinder. This only occurs on "damp" mornings and will go away as the day drys out. It also goes away when I get to higher speeds.

I am guessing that some moisture is affecting something (ignition coil, spark plug wires?)

Anyone have any experience with this or can recommend a course of action?


Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
843 Posts
You might check your EGR valve / solenoid for correct function. When it is not opened enough to the ambient air at idle it will activate the valve with vacuum and then getting a rough idle.
Maybe it needs cleaning up.
You could look into the "How to clean EGR..." thread some week ago on the Diesel models forum for more info on it.
(Forum jump below to the Diesel models section)
Moisture on ignition etc. could be a possibility and would dry out after a while but that initially would not give you clearance of the problem at higher revs, as you mentioned.
At higher revs normally the EGR should kick in, so then it would be running normal.
But at idle it should close the EGR again.
When that keeps sticking you get rough idle.

Good luck,
Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,552 Posts
You might check your EGR valve / solenoid for correct function.
Paul
North American 2.7L in Santa Fe does not have EGR...

I be more interested in condition of plugs and wires,, been changed in the last 60,000 mile ?

That about all the Platinum plug and wires good for.

Also be aware of pigtail condition for crank position sensor right above sensor body for cracking of out covering and insulation for inner 3 wires
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi,

Thanks. I will have a look at the wires/plugs, although I think they were checked awhile back...but you never know!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
I did not know that. I thought all modern engines after 2000 had EGR to meet exhaust emission regulations.
Paul
Actually, there are quite a few cars out there without EGR valves in them. Our old 94 Dodge Shadow comes to mind, as well as my Dodge Dakota.

It's thought that introducing "unburnt fuel" from the exhaust will help cool cylinder temps, but as far as I'm concerned, it's a farce.

For example, the EGR on my Chevy Astro only takes exhaust gasses from one side of the motor and dumps that into the intake only under load. At idle, the EGR stays closed.

AFAIK, all the EGR does is dump carbon into your intake and on the backsides of the intake valves, especially if you have an engine that is starting to burn some oil.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top