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2022 Hyundai Santa Fe, 2.5 Turbo, wDCT, Calligraphy Red
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I checked my manual this is the only two pages with info I don't see where it says what type of oil to use. Maybe different for the 2.0L vs 2.5L turbo engines ?


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Looks like there is no mentioning of such for SF 2.0T 2019.. Anyways with theta-II, that too in ottawa, its best to use full-syn for better oil flow on cold starts. There good deals on oil every now and then, Pennzoils 5L goes for 35$CAN (27 US) these days.
 

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I checked my manual this is the only two pages with info I don't see where it says what type of oil to use. Maybe different for the 2.0L vs 2.5L turbo engines ?


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A 5W20 or 5W30 (of API SN+ or ACEA A5/B5 specifications) is not only available in fully synthetic Group 3/4/5 base oils.

It is available as a blend additionally consisting of Group 2+ and/or Group 2 base oils, other than Groups 3/4/5 base oils.
 

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2019 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.0T
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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
Looks like there is no mentioning of such for SF 2.0T 2019.. Anyways with theta-II, that too in ottawa, its best to use full-syn for better oil flow on cold starts. There good deals on oil every now and then, Pennzoils 5L goes for 35$CAN (27 US) these days.
I'll likely change to full synthetic in the fall at my next oil change for the winter. No more colds temps till Nov.
 

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Best thing to do at this point is drain the oil, change the filter, and fill correctly. That being said, I have a 2021 Kona Limited with the 1.6L turbo engine I bought new with 4mi on the odometer. The owner's manual clearly states to fill with 4.75qts when performing an oil change with filter change. It has now had four oil changes, allowed to drain for at least 15 minutes, each with 4.75qts of oil, and the morning after each oil change the dipstick will read ~1/2" above full. And after 5K miles of driving, still 1/2" above full.

Either the dipstick is the wrong one, or the fill quantity is wrong.
I am glad I found this quote . Just took my dad's took 2016 Tucson with the 1.6 T engine. Had Hyundai do an oil change and when I got it back about a 1/2 inch above the full line... That's after letting it sit for 10 minutes or so after being driven.. Also over a few weeks it never moved never changed never went down below or at the full level line Many people say that's where it should be that these dipsticks are not properly calibrated or generic.

Anyway after a 1000 miles it's now only a quarter inch above the high level hash mark. My suspicion is it is indeed burning oil and I'm trying to figure out how much. I figure when it gets to the full level line I'll start to slowly add oil to bring it again backup about a 1/2 inch above the line where the sealer had it...and I'm gonna guess that's gonna be a quarter of oil?
 

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I always go by the dipstick. Yes, sometimes manufacturers change them to mask issues, like oil consumption, to get more oil in there, but generally speaking, you should never get above the max line. A millimeter or two is fine, but NOT 1/2". The issue is HOW you drain your oil. You can leave it draining overnight, and it'd still have quite a bit of oil in there if you didn't tilt the vehicle in the direction of the drain plug, like ramps. Fortunately, the SF and G70 both have the drain plug facing the rear, so the ramps I use do the trick. But my daughters' Hyundais with the 1.6L engine, have the drain plug in the FRONT, so if you jack up the vehicle at the front to drain oil, quite a bit stays in there. What I do is jack up the rear from the tow hook even higher (to tilt vehicle forward), and a lot more oil comes out (at least 1/2-qt). So I suggest you 1.6L owners do the same, and then you'd be able to get rid of the most used oil, plus be able to pour the stated 4.75 quarts, or even more. If you don't want to (or cannot) do that, just pour enough oil get it to the max line, instead of using the capacity manual states. Hope this helps.
 

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Another thing to consider is just how much oil moves the level on the dipstick. Completely dependent on the capacity of the oil pan. I experimented with the Kona 1.6T and found that the difference from the "ADD" mark and the "FULL" mark was ~1/4 of a quart. Same for the difference between the "FULL" mark and the level shown when putting in the 4.75qts called for. So, about 8oz of oil.
 

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Many people say that's where it should be that these dipsticks are not properly calibrated or generic.
A competent dealer mechanic should be able to confirm that the engine has the correct dipstick.
Don't depend on rumors or guessing.
My suspicion is it is indeed burning oil and I'm trying to figure out how much.
If it's overfilled by 1/2 inch it might be losing oil through the PCV system.
 

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So, I just did another oil change and decided to get really picky about how much oil to put into the engine. What I found is that if I put in the amount of oil that is specified for the 2.0L engine the level on the dipstick is just below the full mark. But if I put in the required amount of oil for the 1.6T engine (which is what I have) the oil level on the dipstick will be ~1/2" above the full mark. In actual fluid level measurement, about a half quart more.

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I know there are additional lines to get oil to/from the turbo, but I will be talking to the dealer about this. The one time I let them do the oil change they put in 4.75qts and the dip stick showed ~1/2" above the full mark.
 

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I have a 2.0T and I find the following... I have 3" low profile ramps I use to lift up the front those few inches, I drain the oil and I will let it drip for about 10 min or so... and I find a full 5L is perfect for level ver the dip stick.. using the 5L , the level it just maybe 1mm below full (cold)... and hot , its like maybe .5mm above full.
 

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Is the dealer draining the oil or pumping it from the dipstick tube?
Draining. I watched the oil change to see how they kept oil from getting into the underbody panel. That's another subject, but common issue on the 1.6T in the Kona.

All measurements were made with all four wheels on the ground, level surface. I do know that the range from "Full" to "Add" on the 1.6T dipstick is only ~1/2qt. Small oil pan, so a little short or overage on the fill makes a big move on the stick.
 

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I asked because one time the "tech" pumped the oil through the dipstick and did not insert the tube all the way in and only part of the oil was recovered! Then the dummy added the required amount of oiled and it was extremely over by almost a quart!
 

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Some engines drain quicker than others.

For the 2.0T/2.4GDI, with front of vehicle on ramps, like harborfreight or rhinoramps, remove both the drain plug and oil filters, then take a break. The longer you wait, the more oil will drain out. You can come back an hour later and it'll still have a slow drip to it. Shop doesn't have that freedom of time.

For the 1.6T, check drain plug location. HyundaiKia put the drainplug on the wrong end of the pan on some engines.

So, if the drain plug is in the front, to remove more of the oil, you'll need to jack/ramp the rear wheels only. Does your dealer or gypsylube raise the rear of the car during service? Of course not.

In order to install the full amount of oil, you need to remove the full amount of oil, which no dealer/shop is doing.
You just won't get that level of attention to detail from your dealer, an indie shop, or quickielube.
Most vehicles will be level on the lift, or level on the floor with the tech in the pit under vehicle. They'll pull the drain plug, reinstall it, then pull and reinstall the filter, not giving either more than 1 minute to drain.

And if you have one of those cars with the drain plug on the left or right, and not front or back, be the rocket scientist and ramp both right or left tires as needed if you diy. This will confuse your neighbors, especially if they don't understand gravity.
 

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In the Kona the drain plug is on the front. But it doesn't need to be on ramps at all to drain it, or to access the oil filter. There is also a deep recess in the pan where the drain plug is located.
 

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All 1.6L engines have the drain plug in the front. And it's rare not to need at least a pair of 2x6s to be able to get under the car, and get an oil container there. So you need to raise the car from the rear tow hook (in the middle of the car, below the rear bumper), to drain most of the old oil (there will always be some left over). Otherwise, a lot of dirty oil will stay in there, and there isn't much to begin with. Fortunately, both the 2.0L and 2.5L have it at the back, where it should be.
 
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