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Hi. I’m new to the forum and looking to see if anyone else has experienced the issue we are having. We have a Santa Fe limited- 2013- 3.3 L V6. Two weeks ago while driving down the highway, the RPMs went up to 4, and we pulled over. As pulling over, the oil light came on and the engine started making a loud clanking sound. Upon opening the hood, there was no oil on the dipstick. No warning light ever came on! I have always gotten my routine oil changes and maintenance done at the dealership from the time I purchased it pre-owned in 2018. The car has 104,000 miles on it. My extended warranty expired at 99,000 miles. Hyundai said they won’t help us out AT ALL.
 

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Why should Hyundai help you out if you ran it out of oil? The warranty isn't a form of socialism for all trolls to use.

Most engines come with dipsticks. Check oil level at every fuel fill up and top off as needed.
 
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I have always gotten my routine oil changes and maintenance done at the dealership from the time I purchased it pre-owned in 2018. The car has 104,000 miles on it. My extended warranty expired at 99,000 miles. Hyundai said they won’t help us out AT ALL.
Apparently all the engines are junk, and in the defense of the OP, must state that with the 2.4 & 2.0T engine problems, oil can be consumed within a few weeks, and the 2017 Santa Fe 3.3 was recalled for bearing wear and engine seizures, similar to the crappy 4 cyl engine recall. I would assume same problem with the '13 in question, but you're fighting an uphill battle as apparently there isn't any documentation indicating the 3.3 engines were defective in all years.

One problem, as it is with a many owners, they believe that the oil light will indicate low oil level, but in essence, that light is an indicator of low oil pressure and when that light comes on, big problems can occur. Now there are some vehicles that do have a low oil level indicator, light and/or alarm, but not this one, so there is no substitute for periodically checking the oil level.

Sorry to say, in this case, Hyundai would not be liable for any compensation, and even if the problem ocurred while within the warranty period, I doubt that they would honor said warranty as they would cite lack of proper maintenance by owner, no oil.

Options, don't see a new engine available, but if it were, @ $9000 installed, so probably a used engine @ $5000-$6000 installed.

I've said this before, anyone with an engine problem, make certain the oil is up to full, or at least between add and full before having the car delivered/driven to the stealership, and if need be, add used, not new oil to get the proper level. Sounds like a PIA, which it is, but you'll be better off in the long run.
 

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Just a comment on Hyundai engines and oil. I have a 2018 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.0 with about 38,000 miles. I check my oil frequently, every gas up, and have never had to add oil between changes. I use Mobil 1 5w30 oil. Maybe I am lucky but my only complaint about the 2.0 engine is it tends to be a little noisy on startup and still noisier than other brands aft warm up. I was sitting in the passenger seat waiting for my wife and had several cars pull in beside me. All were very quite compared to my Hyundai. Lexus (I know high end), Honda, and Nissan. They were very quite but none were turbo. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Just a comment on Hyundai engines and oil. I have a 2018 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.0 with about 38,000 miles. I check my oil frequently, every gas up, and have never had to add oil between changes. I use Mobil 1 5w30 oil. Maybe I am lucky but my only complaint about the 2.0 engine is it tends to be a little noisy on startup and still noisier than other brands aft warm up. I was sitting in the passenger seat waiting for my wife and had several cars pull in beside me. All were very quite compared to my Hyundai. Lexus (I know high end), Honda, and Nissan. They were very quite but none were turbo. Just my 2 cents.
Really off the OP rpoblem, but just keep in mind that no sort of maintenance, meaning oil quality, type, or frequency of changes will avoid the inevitable if the engine is destined to succumb. There have been vehicles with 7,000 miles to over 200,000 miles that have needed engine replacement, so keep your fingers crossed if you have a car with one of these crappy engines, but it's not all that bad, just dangerous and an inconvenience when it dies on the highway, but at least a new engine is installed.

Noisy is an understatement as they sound like a bucket of bolts thanks to the wonderfully designed direct injection system, so you get noise along with possibly engine seizure that's not available with other cars.
 

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Just a comment on Hyundai engines and oil. I have a 2018 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.0 with about 38,000 miles. I check my oil frequently, every gas up, and have never had to add oil between changes. I use Mobil 1 5w30 oil. Maybe I am lucky but my only complaint about the 2.0 engine is it tends to be a little noisy on startup and still noisier than other brands aft warm up. I was sitting in the passenger seat waiting for my wife and had several cars pull in beside me. All were very quite compared to my Hyundai. Lexus (I know high end), Honda, and Nissan. They were very quite but none were turbo. Just my 2 cents.
Many-many users report Mobil-1 AFE (vanilla) as a noisy oil. I experienced it also on three OCI occasions. Like Major League Baseball always says...
.....Three strikes and you are out....

If I were to purchase Mobil-1 again someday, I'd get the Mobil-1 EP 5w30. It's only 2-3 dollars more for a five quart jug at Walmart. Users also comment highly on the Mobil-1 EP High Mileage version. I may try that one someday too.
 
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