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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2016 Sonata Hybrid. Engine went from normal to catastrophic failure within just a couple of minutes. Had it towed to the dealer. Verdict is that oil pan was nearly dry and engine seized. Cost for new engine including labor is $3950. Full disclosure: I went way too long between oil changes. And yes, I'm regretting that very much. I take full responsibility for that.
My question is, if the oil was that low why didn't the oil light come on??? I asked the guy at the service department and his answer was, "Well probably because it was mostly running in electric mode." That sounds like BS to me, but I don't really know. It just seems like even if the owner is an idiot who waits way too long for an oil change, shouldn't there be some type of warning before everything goes to ****?
 

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Most cars do not have a low oil level warning light. The "oil" light that they do have is a no-oil-pressure warning light. By the time that the oil gets so low that the pump can't even make 5 PSI, engine damage has already been done. You have to check the oil level on the dipstick under the hood every so often. This is true even if you do the oil changes on time.

Did you save $4K by extending the oil changes? Did you really not have the minute or two needed every week to check the oil level? (I know the answers, and I'm not trying to be mean. I just want you to think about this with your next car/engine.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Oh believe me, I'm already asking myself ALL of those questions. Pretty sure I won't make this mistake again.
 

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Oil light is for PSI and not for oil level. Learn to check the oil regularly, top off as needed, and change it regularly.

Oil light PSI's are typically too low to save an engine. It has always been a "too late" id1ot light.
 
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Stikll for the sump to go almost dry. How many miles since the last oil change? A hybrid no less, I would think this shoukld not have happened unless the OCI was over 10,000 miles or so
 

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$3900.. HA !!

Better re-inspect price on a "WRITTEN ESTIMATE"....

We have done long block already,, I want say Long Block in container upward of $5000,, could be wrong, I can find out Monday.. and the plumbing involved is disaster,, my fella had to get it apart to know what all he needed to put ti back together..

Some poor tech going to be saying some "select words" while doing this job

Using factory Long Block and dealer install may retain remainder of 10/100 if you original owner,, verify that
 

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Just curious...but how many miles did you go?
I'm wondering that as well. I recall reading other posts for earlier models where people ran out of oil but said they were within the 7,500 change interval, which caused me some pause when researching cars.

I have my own home so it's easy for me to spot a leak on the concrete. But our daughter lives in an apartment, parks in a different spot each time and the concrete there is perpetually stained. A year ago she came home for a week and we saw a spot under her car. The oil drain gasket was leaking and the threads were partially stripped but she didn't know it. (She had an oil change before she came home). The oil pan was replaced and the quickie oil place reimbursed her.

Then the last time there was a small stain and it was oily. The new oil pan gasket was leaking and needed replaced. She never knew about either one because there was nothing to draw her attention to it. The dipstick level was fine in both cases, at that time...
 

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I recall reading other posts for earlier models where people ran out of oil but said they were within the 7,500 change interval, which caused me some pause when researching cars.

I can see this happening with a car that used 1qt per 1500 miles.
That's an inconvenient but not defective rate of oil consumption.
Many cars, especially Subaru and the European makes use that much off the showroom floor.
Toyota considers 1qt per 600 miles the threshold for warranty claims.


With a new-to-me car (like my current Tucson) I check oil after every gas fill up until I find out its rate of consumption.
(I've been lucky to not own an oil burner in 40 years.)
I don't recommend checking oil based on time (every week etc.)
If there's no consumption then I check every 1000 miles, easy to follow on the odometer.
1000 miles can take me anywhere from 2 months to 2 days (road trip).


How to spot an oil burner quickly and casually?
Check the tailpipe for oily soot deposits.
My 2006 Matrix had the cleanest tailpipe of all the previous cars I've owned: clean and shiny inside.
My Tucson has a little dry soot, but that's expected with GDI.


Walking my dog in the morning I often look over cars as I walk by.
I can spot oil burners with not only black in the tailpipe but also dark deposits nearby on the bumper etc.
Often an aging Euro luxury model.
 

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I can see this happening with a car that used 1qt per 1500 miles.
That's an inconvenient but not defective rate of oil consumption.
Many cars, especially Subaru and the European makes use that much off the showroom floor.
Toyota considers 1qt per 600 miles the threshold for warranty claims.


With a new-to-me car (like my current Tucson) I check oil after every gas fill up until I find out its rate of consumption.
(I've been lucky to not own an oil burner in 40 years.)
I don't recommend checking oil based on time (every week etc.)
If there's no consumption then I check every 1000 miles, easy to follow on the odometer.
1000 miles can take me anywhere from 2 months to 2 days (road trip).


How to spot an oil burner quickly and casually?
Check the tailpipe for oily soot deposits.
My 2006 Matrix had the cleanest tailpipe of all the previous cars I've owned: clean and shiny inside.
My Tucson has a little dry soot, but that's expected with GDI.


Walking my dog in the morning I often look over cars as I walk by.
I can spot oil burners with not only black in the tailpipe but also dark deposits nearby on the bumper etc.
Often an aging Euro luxury model.
I have a friend who was at Virginia Tech getting his medical degree and he drove an old beater. Keep a case of oil in the trunk. One day he got pulled over by a VA State Trooper and he came up to the window and said.....Son, do you have a permit to dust crops with this here machine.....I about blew chunks laughing so hard....Still do and it's been 40 years....
 

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You know you have a beater when:
You stop at the gas station to fill the oil and check the gas.
Filling the gas tank doubles the value of the car.


One of my older brothers, when he was in the Navy stationed in Annapolis in the late '60s, would pitch in with 3-4 buddies and buy a $50 car to drive to DC for the weekend leave.
It was cheaper than bus tickets.
Sometimes they didn't make the round trip.
Let it coast into a ditch, find a phone and call my aunt (more forgiving than my father) to pick them up.
Once they were close enough to walk back to Annapolis.
 
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