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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
do you guys have anything in the trunk that's for 'just in case'?

CURRENTLY MY CAR:

A 18000lb Heavy Duty Recovery Strap


A 6500LB yellow tow strap


1. recovery d-ring thats in my trailer hitch



IN A TRUNK BAG: jumper cables, couple small LED flashlights, flairs, zip-ties, rain jacket, bungee cords, fuses, red shop towels, tire plug kit, large mag-light, heavy duty fire-retardant gloves, lite-duty gloves, snow brush, tire psi gauge, duct tape, etc

Ratchet Style tie-downs & bungee cords.

12 Volt, 150 PSI High Volume Air Compressor. (this compressor filled two of my trailer tires to 90psi, Filled my car's tires, and my bikes tires so far without a problem.)

Cordless Impact Wrench: Milaukee (167 ft lbs of tq!) I have my lugnut socket on it


Battery Booster Pack:



Trauma Bag: (filled with trauma kit supplies & first aid supplies). I treated this bag to the same items thats in my IFAK(ex-military & tactical world folks will know exactly what this is). Everything from nasopharyngeal tube(nasal trumpet), to tension pneumothorax chest seal, israeli bandage, CAT(combat action tourniquet), and many other first aid tools.

Duty Bag In Rear Seat with personal use items. (socks, underwear, mouth wash, hand lotion, tooth picks, meds, snacks, plastic utensils, persona feminine hygiene items for the ms., straws, bottles of water, towels, 2 ponchos, hand warmer packets, etc)

200watt Power Inverter

Unscented candle in a glass jar: (to provide heat during winter months if needed)

Tactical Folding Shovel:


i think i have more items, just gotta remember lol
 

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-Flashlight
-Jumper cable
-Early warning device (this should be standard on all cars!)
-Tire pump
-Wheel chock
-Cross wrench
-Racing jack... just kidding. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #4
anyone have any emergency lighting/strobes? (either for police, ems, fire, security, towing applications?)
 

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I think all I need on mine is a piece of paper with ImStricken's phone number. Then I call him to come save me. I'm sure he has anything I could need in his car :D

Just kidding. I don't have much, jumper cable, flashlight, jack and wrench. 1st aid kit too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think all I need on mine is a piece of paper with ImStricken's phone number. Then I call him to come save me. I'm sure he has anything I could need in his car :D

Just kidding. I don't have much, jumper cable, flashlight, jack and wrench. 1st aid kit too.
lol, that's because i am the "got to" guy for my whole family. i kinda have to be the prepared one, or my family will end up missing in action lol
 

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Discussion Starter #7
STORY FROM THE RECENT BIG STORM

FARMINGVILLE, N.Y. (AP) — Stranded for hours on a snow-covered road, Priscilla Arena prayed, took out a sheet of loose-leaf paper and wrote what she thought might be her last words to her husband and children.
She told her 9 1/2-year-old daughter, Sophia, she was "picture-perfect beautiful." And she advised her 5 ½-year-old son, John: "Remember all the things that mommy taught you. Never say you hate someone you love. Take pride in the things you do, especially your family. ... Don't get angry at the small things; it's a waste of precious time and energy. Realize that all people are different, but most people are good. "
"My love will never die — remember, always," she added.
Arena, who was rescued in an Army canvas truck after about 12 hours, was one of hundreds of drivers who spent a fearful, chilly night stuck on highways in a blizzard that plastered New York's Long Island with more than 30 inches of snow, its ferocity taking many by surprise despite warnings to stay off the roads.
Even plows were mired in the snow or blocked by stuck cars, so emergency workers had to resort to snowmobiles to try to reach motorists. Four-wheel-drive vehicles, tractor-trailers and a couple of ambulances could be seen stranded along the roadway and ramps of the Long Island Expressway. Stuck drivers peeked out from time to time, running their cars intermittently to warm up as they waited for help.
With many still stranded hours after the snow stopped, Gov. Andrew Cuomo urged other communities to send plows to help dig out in eastern Long Island, which took the state's hardest hit by far in the massive Northeast storm.
In Connecticut, where the storm dumped more than 3 feet of snow in some places, the National Guard rescued about 90 stranded motorists, taking a few to hospitals with hypothermia.
The scenes came almost exactly two years after a blizzard marooned at least 1,500 cars and buses on Chicago's iconic Lake Shore Drive, leaving hundreds of people shivering in their vehicles for as long as 12 hours and questioning why the city didn't close the crucial thoroughfare earlier.
Cuomo and other officials were similarly asked why they didn't act to shut down major highways in Long Island in advance of the storm, especially given the sprawling area's reputation for gridlock. The expressway is often called "the world's longest parking lot."
"The snow just swallowed them up. It came down so hard and so fast," explained Suffolk County Executive Steven Bellone.
"That's not an easy call," added Cuomo, who noted that people wanted to get home and that officials had warned them to take precautions because the worst of the snow could start by the evening rush hour. Flashing highway signs underscored the message ahead of time: "Heavy Snow Expected. Avoid PM Travel!"
"People need to act responsibly in these situations," Cuomo said.
But many workers didn't have the option of taking off early Friday, Arena noted. The 41-year-old sales account manager headed home from an optical supply business in Ronkonkoma around 4 p.m. She soon found her SUV stuck along a road in nearby Farmingville.
"Even though we would dig ourselves out and push forward, the snow kept piling, and therefore we all got stuck, all of us," she recalled later at Brookhaven Town Hall, where several dozen stranded motorists were taken after being rescued. Many others opted to stay with their cars.
Richard Ebbrecht left his Brooklyn chiropractic office around 3 p.m. for his home in Middle Island, about 60 miles away, calculating that he could make the drive home before the worst of the blizzard set in. He was wrong.
As the snow came rushing down faster than he'd foreseen, he got stuck six or seven times on the expressway and on other roads. Drivers began helping each other shovel and push, he said, but to no avail. He finally gave up and spent the night in his car on a local thoroughfare, only about two miles from his home.
"I could run my car and keep the heat on and listen to the radio a little bit," he said.
He walked home around at 8 a.m., leaving his car.
Late-shifters including Wayne Jingo had little choice but to risk it if they wanted to get home. By early afternoon, he'd been stuck in his pickup truck alongside the Long Island Expressway for nearly 12 hours.
He'd left his job around midnight as a postal worker at Kennedy Airport and headed home to Medford, about 50 miles east. He was at an exit in Ronkonkoma — almost home — around 1:45 a.m. when another driver came barreling at him westbound, the wrong way, he said. Jingo swerved to avoid the oncoming car, missed the exit and ended up stuck on the highway's grass shoulder.
He rocked the truck back and forth to try to free it, but it only sank down deeper into the snow and shredded one of his tires. He called 911. A police officer came by at 9:30 a.m. and said he would send a tow truck.
At 1 p.m. Saturday, Jingo was still waiting.
"I would have been fine if I didn't have to swerve," he said.
In Middle Island, a Wal-Mart remained unofficially open long past midnight to accommodate more than two dozen motorists who were stranded on nearby roads.
"We're here to mind the store, but we can't let people freeze out there," manager Jerry Greek told Newsday.
Officials weren't aware of any deaths among the stranded drivers, Cuomo said. Suffolk County police said no serious injuries had been reported among stuck motorists, but officers were still systematically checking stranded vehicles late Saturday afternoon.
Even cars that weren't stuck found the going on the expressway agonizingly slow — especially for a 21-year-old mother-to-be who was trying to get to a hospital to deliver her baby Saturday morning. Her own mom was driving her, as the infant's father was snowbound elsewhere.
Suffolk County Police Officer Kevin Wustenhoff went to help and decided to drive the woman 15 miles to the hospital in his police SUV, rather than waiting for an ambulance.
As a father of three, "I was able to just kind of walk her through it — breathing and just keeping her calm," he recalled later.
Delivery appeared imminent when they arrived, but the baby hadn't yet been born when Wustenhoff checked in late Saturday night.
While the expressway eventually opened Saturday, about 30 miles of the highway was to be closed again Sunday for snow removal.
Susan Cassara left her job at a Middle Island day care center around 6:30 p.m. Friday, after driving some of the children home because their parents couldn't get there to pick them up.
She got stuck on one road until about 2:30 a.m. Then a plow helped her get out — but she got stuck again, she said. Finally, an Army National Guardsman got to her on a snowmobile after 4 a.m.
"It was so cool. Strapped on, held on and came all the way here" to the makeshift shelter at the Brookhaven Town Hall, she said. "Something for my bucket list."
THIS WOMAN NEEDS A GOOD MAN IN HER LIFE THAT WILL PREPARE HER & HER CAR WITH SEASONAL SURVIVAL ITEMS!
this dummy spent 12hours on a snowy road, stranded in her car, and took out a piece of paper to write her "goodbye" letter to her kids/husband. This is sad. Its sad that people are stranded for 12 hours in the snow, and think they will die. Its sad that people venture out in a simple snow storm and dont think to prepare a little beforehand, just in case they get stuck. everyone in the winter should keep warm clothing or blankets, water, food, gloves, flares, first aid, safety equipment, etc in their cars.)
(i know it was a lot of snow, but it wasnt like she got trapped in a flood/hurricane/deep forest with animals and no shelter for gods sake. she was in her car, and had to simply camp out for a night- chill lady! no need for a goodbye letter lol)

IS IT ME, OR DID PEOPLE LOSE THEIR SELF-RELIANCE AND SUSTAINABILITY? WHAT PISSES ME OFF THE MOST, IS THAT HER HUSBAND DIDNT DO EVERYTHING IN HIS CAPACITY TO OUTFIT HIS WOMAN WITH EVERYTHING SHE NEEDS TO STAY SAFE. i go to extreme lengths to make sure mine has every tool she can have to stay safe. bags full of everything she will need god forbid she is stranded or breaks down. MEN WAKE UP!!!! :mad: :mad: :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)

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I have no patience for women like this and I am a woman. I have my sante well stocked with emergency supplies,know how to maintain it and do my own oil changes. have been doing so since I was 18 yo. Most women don't even know how to pop the hood. Men should teach their wives as well as help them maintain the vehicle IMO. Having tools won't help a whole lot if you don't know how to use them and are stranded in no mans land. And for goodnesss sakes teach them how to change a flat.
 

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Snow, sleet, lakes? Where on earth do you people live? All most people carry in Australia apart from a factory jack and wheel brace is a mobile phone, if your out of phone range than it doesn't matter what tools you have, if you can't fix it yourself your knackered. Saw some snow once, 1993 I think it was,,,,,,,,,,^_^ Our climatic conditions over here are very tame compared to yours, our biggest problem dehydration due to extreme heat, a broken down car in the sun can hit over 60C inside very fast, our survival gear, wide brimmed hat, water, more water, find shade. We are well served by auto clubs in city areas so really a mobile is all you need, country areas however,,,,,,
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Since FL has tons of lakes near roads... you want one of these in glove compartment or middle storage units between the two front seats.

Designed to shatters the glass and the razor to cut through seat belt.
great post! i actually have a smith&wesson rescue knife on my duty bag, and its always in my car. it has a seat-belt cutter and a spring loaded window punch. great tool. you guys can also get the ResQme

 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Snow, sleet, lakes? Where on earth do you people live? All most people carry in Australia apart from a factory jack and wheel brace is a mobile phone, if your out of phone range than it doesn't matter what tools you have, if you can't fix it yourself your knackered.
you are taking your life and placing it into the hands of those "car clubs" and the police/fire/rescue to help find you. especially in a hot country like yours.
im not one for that. readiness & survival was burned into my brain - and i pass that knowledge along to every single person i can, most importantly the females in my life (Ms.ImStricken, mom, sister, Ms.ImStricken's sisters & mom.)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have no patience for women like this and I am a woman. I have my sante well stocked with emergency supplies,know how to maintain it and do my own oil changes. have been doing so since I was 18 yo. Most women don't even know how to pop the hood. Men should teach their wives as well as help them maintain the vehicle IMO. Having tools won't help a whole lot if you don't know how to use them and are stranded in no mans land. And for goodnesss sakes teach them how to change a flat.
you sound awesome. more women should be like you. you sound like a prepper! ;) big cudo's to you. seriously, i applaud you.
 

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I think I have all that you said before, plus :

in the passenger locker :
- SEPAQ national park entrance card
- napkins
- mosquitos repellant stuffs
- ipod cable
- stereo jack cable
- dynamo rechargeable led light and USB charger
- high energy food bars (x5)
- chewing gum
- condoms

under the trunk :
- small axe (to cut wood, saved my life once)
- two heavy duty cover + cords
- 2 liter bottle with water
- candles with titanium candle handler + lighter + matches
- north american detailed map (US + CANADA)
- barbecue grill

in a box in the trunk :
- 12v boiler
- tea bags + sugar + cup
- fork, knife, salt, pepper
- microfiber cover
- 12v -> 120v inverter 85W
- natural fire starter + small oil fire starter can
- hat with screen (for mosquitos)
- swimming suit
- towel
- two redbull energy drink (for lonnng nights driving)

in the trunk : -20° celcius sleeping bag

I also usualy carry 2 hockey sticks :)


Everything in there was used at least once !
 

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WOW. I'm used to pressing the Onstar button in my old GM vehicles. I guess Bluelink does nothing for ya in a Hyundai. I need to get my money back.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
WOW. I'm used to pressing the Onstar button in my old GM vehicles. I guess Bluelink does nothing for ya in a Hyundai. I need to get my money back.
the whole point to prepping, is to not have to rely upon a service(government or private) that can fail, or take hours/days to find you. even if you are not to far off the beaten path, often times reception for these onstar/bluelink services is cutoff due to your location.

furthermore, sometimes weather conditions prevent rescue personnel from venturing out to find/rescue you. people have just experienced that with the recent SANDY storm here in NJ. people were left to fend for themselves.

its imperative that everyone stops relying upon other's for help, and starts prepping for life's unexpected.
 
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