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I have had traction control on other vehicles and loved it. You could stomp the gas to the floor and the vehicles quickly got me up to speed. I run premium winter tires which surely helps.

My Elantra GT is just disappointing. It seems like they just shut me down to 5 percent throttle and its hard to get moving. It often leaves me to be a sitting duck when I try and pull into fast moving traffic and it takes over. I have been turning it off more and more and my wife has been doing the same. Believe me, it is a cold day in **** when my wife actually agrees with me but that's another store.

The problems, unlike my other cars that had a switch to leave the option either on or off, the Elantra has a digital button that must be continually switched off.

Can someone tell me if there is a way to permanently turn of the Hyundai traction control? It is pretty much useless and actually dangerous in the fact it leaves my stranded in traffic.
 

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Well Said!:clap:

I had my 1st scarey experience with my new at the time 2005 Tucson LX V6 AWD. It came with the new ESC/Traction control device. I was trying to make a u-turn in the rain on a busy 2 lane country rd. with wet gravel on both sides. Not being familiar with this, I waited for an opening, and went to make a quick maneuver, But, the Tucson would not respond to the pedal? It just crawled all the way through the u-turn, and about 1/2 mile past the turn, regardless of how much I pushed on the gas pedal! :eek:
It was quite dangerous, & frustrating, as cars from both directions were coming at me, & beeping, and I was a sitting duck, didn't know what to do! Luckily, the Tucson, my wife, & I, escaped unharmed!

Ever since then I've wanted to permanently disable the ESP/Traction control!

I might have found a way recently to disable it, I will post back once I get a chance to test it.
 

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The one thing I have found is that every car's traction control is different. I love the one in my Elantra GT. I was not a fan of the one in my Kia Rondo. As much as I was not a fan of it in the Rondo for maneuvers that you speak of above, I would never consider turning it off, because the good things (controlling swerving) greatly outweigh the bad (no fast acceleration in slippery conditions). I just accepted the fact that there are some things that the car can't do well. That Rondo was rock solid when it came to driving freeway speeds on slippery roads. I prefer the GT for fast take offs in all conditions. The GT is not as good on the highway when slippery. It is what it is.
 

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Compared to the Ford Escape I previously owned, the GT's traction control works great. The Ford would simply kill all power and apply random brakes. The Elantra varies power and braking to appropriate wheels, and does an excellent job of it.

BC mountain driving, highway and side streets, with Nokian Hakkapeliitta tires, 6spd. We see our fair share of all conditions, usually unplowed when I have to go to work, and I feel very comfortable in the GT
 

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I have been turning it off more and more and my wife has been doing the same. Believe me, it is a cold day in **** when my wife actually agrees with me but that's another story.
:devil: :frozen: I haven't had to resort to pulling out quickly into oncoming traffic. Not yet, anyway. So, I'm not the person to answer this. Personally, it works well for me. I have seen the positive effects on the few occasions it kicked in. If I was in a colder climate being pelted with continuous barrages of snow and ice, I might think differently.

Are you certain that this isn't something that needs to be addressed at the dealer to see if it's not working correctly, or not? Afterthought: it must be since the wife agrees and has also turned hers off and liking it better in that mode.
 

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How to turn off traction control??

How do you turn off traction control in a 2014 Elantra Sport? The tires they put on at the dealership are AWFUL, I had the worst drive, one of the scariest drives of my life Wednesday morning after we here in Boulder got hit my the Alaskan typhoon remnants. WE have a mere 2-3 inches of snow atop ice, I could barely keep control of the car, the anxiety level hit the roof.
I've been driving 34 years now, 23 in CO, 11 in NY, NEVER had such a frightening experience in the snow. I live in a condo, no room for snow tires. This car/these tires only have 5200 miles on them. GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!
 

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How do you turn off traction control in a 2014 Elantra Sport? The tires they put on at the dealership are AWFUL, I had the worst drive, one of the scariest drives of my life Wednesday morning after we here in Boulder got hit my the Alaskan typhoon remnants. WE have a mere 2-3 inches of snow atop ice, I could barely keep control of the car, the anxiety level hit the roof.
I've been driving 34 years now, 23 in CO, 11 in NY, NEVER had such a frightening experience in the snow. I live in a condo, no room for snow tires. This car/these tires only have 5200 miles on them. GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!
****, was looking for an answer to your (and my) problem :(
 

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How do you turn off traction control in a 2014 Elantra Sport?
Traction control is part of the ESC system and you disable it by holding the ESC OFF button down. Of course, that's not going to necessarily improve traction unless you're in an unusual situation where wheelspin helps you get going, typically deep fluffy snow. For conditions involving ice, turning off ESC just improves your chances of visiting the ditch rather than stuck on the side of the road.

Dedicated snow tires are the real solution, although snow over ice is one of the most challenging situations, so any car (even a SUV) is going to be a handful in the worst-case conditions. My last challenging traction situation was after a brief 1-2" coating of sleety/snow coming home from work and even with a AWD SUV with new/premium all-season tires, I was all over the road and barely made it home. Snow/ice conditions are so variable, it's hard to draw any conclusions with one experience. Going to a different, more expensive all-season tire than what the Elantra comes with might help, but it might not also.

BTW, in case there is any confusion and you're blaming your dealer, the cars come from the factory with one of a couple different tires (typically Hankooks on Elantras).... the dealer did not put them on the car and had nothing to do with their selection.

- Mark
 

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I am also one that hates this traction control. Not a big deal to turn it off every time you get in the car. It is like sitting down in the cockpit of an airplane. All of the buttons, switches, and gauges you have to check before you can start flying. I have enjoyed many e-braking maneuvers in previous vehicles having fun on those snowy days, needless to say I have tried doing such maneuvers with my GT and I quickly realized that the traction control will take over control when the car goes out of control. This hinders the fun of doing an e-brake maneuver in the snow but can be avoided by turning off the traction control. It is worth a try one day in a empty snowy parking lot. try to put your car out of control and watch how the traction control takes over. It is actually impressive. But for getting up to speed from the get go it is terrible, and dangerous I might add.

Another beef I have is with the ABS brakes. I HATE ABS brakes so much. 2 days ago I almost got an a car accident because of the ABS. I was driving north on the 410 when the car in front of me dropped a snow terd (for all you southerners that is a build up of snowy ice that falls off from under the wheel well). It was pretty big and it is never a good idea to hit one of these as they can damage your bumper, so I swerved towards the left shoulder to avoid hitting it. At that moment the car in front of me started to brake. Everyone was slowing down rapidly (no I was not riding his ass), when I applied my brakes it just happened that my left tires were on the rumble strip (grooved line in the pavement on the shoulder). My ABS sensors thought the tire was slipping so the ABS kicked in full gear and my car would not slow down. I was going to rear end the guy in front of me hard, so I reacted quickly and put my car right into the shoulder to avoid the collision. By this time my right tires were on the rumble strip and again the ABS thought I was slipping due to the vibration i guess. So i am pressing the brakes and the ABS is doing its thing and my car took about 50" to stop. I passed 4 cars on the shoulder as my ABS was going bezerk. I was so effing pissed off and scared all at the same time.

ARRRGGGHHhhhh
 

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I was considering starting a thread on people's experiences with ESC.

I always find it interesting when people say how much they "hate" ABS or ESC. They typically share their personal thoughts on why they think it's garbage tell a story about "how my ABS almost killed me."

Not trying to start a fight here... just curious if you can share any Youtube videos or other reputable websites that share your feelings. I searched Youtube, but couldn't find any videos of why traction control is dangerous or whatever. There are probably a thousand videos of how it helps in most everyday situations.

Again, don't want to get flamed, but my feeling is that anyone who thinks they're better off without traction control or ABS is simply wrong. They're basing that on macho-ism or a "gut feeling" or anecdotal evidence... If you can't accelerate cuz of slippery conditions, having your wheels spinning won't really get you up to speed any faster. If you think your ABS lengthened your stopping distance, I would argue that you're wrong... (I do concede ABS might not work as well as a 4-wheel lock in some situations, but the truth is, the only way we'd be able to tell is to put the car through the same conditions with and without the electronic assistance, which is impossible.)

I am a highly experienced winter driver who has never, in 25 years, had an accident due to snow/ice. My Elantra GT is my first car with ESC and I'm glad I have it....
 

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Again, don't want to get flamed, but my feeling is that anyone who thinks they're better off without traction control or ABS is simply wrong.
I think you're being too black-and-white about an issue that is a little grey - maybe very dark grey, but still grey. Every safety system has unusual corners of the envelope where it may not help and might even cause harm. ABS, traction control, and ESC are no different.

In the case of ABS, there are some situations where ABS will lengthen your stopping distance. One is simply that if you're really, really good (and probably get lucky), you may be able to threshold brake right at the point before lockup and get more traction that ABS which has to cycle on/off. Now average drivers on average roads can seldom match ABS, but expert drivers in very predictable conditions can sometimes do better. The beauty of ABS is that it takes no skill to get close to shortest stopping distance - just push as hard as you can on the brakes.

Another situation is the rumble strip one mentioned above. If the braking cycling period and the rumble strip period are well matched, you can get into a situation where the brakes are always cycling off when the wheels have traction and always cycling on when they don't. It's unusual but it can happen.

There's also the situation where in deep snow, you may be able to gain more traction by spinning a wheel (churning your way through the snow) and be able to get more braking by locking a wheel (the snow builds up a dam in front of the locked wheel). Again, not common, but it can happen.

It's the same with seat belts and air bags. Almost all the time, they're beneficial, but there are some situations where they have caused harm.

None of this means these systems aren't generally worthwhile and defeating them should be done only if you have a very specific plan in mind for why you think you can do better without. As you say, the problem with these arguments is that people react to anecdotal situation and think that a safety system made a difference one way or the other, but there is really no way to replay the incident again with or without the system.

- Mark
 

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I'm not a big fan of them either under some conditions but I have never seen anything written anywhere that would indicate, surmise, propose or profess that ABS systems will shorten the stopping distance of any equipped vehicle under any condition anywhere or anytime. Period! Their purpose is to provide a modicum of steering control under lock up conditions where vehicle control is otherwise lost. If you insist on driving too fast for conditions and find yourself in a "lock up" situation then you will find comfort in the fact that your "Speed Racer" ass will have the ability to steer yourself into the nearest solid object while the ABS pulses it's brains out to protect you from yourself. To all of you human computers out there I say, "go Speed racer, go". The Darwin award will give your loved one's something to remember you by. The "gene pool" could use a little dredging.


I may be a bit jaded in my comments today since yesterday for lunch I was served an airbag compliments of a 15 year old supervised driver that admitted to the attending officers that, while the medics attended to his mother, " I was going to fast to think, I couldn't react". So, whatever you do, keep your SRS in good working order cause it's the last link in the safety chain that you think that "you" are the strongest link.


Nuff said.
 

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I definitely find my traction control has come on a LOT this winter, but we've had months of -20 or colder so it's not surprising. Lots of ice everywhere. Half the time I drive my automatic in manual mode now and start in second gear.

As to ABS, I've already had two situations this winter where cars were slowing down quickly and I had to slam on the breaks. ABS kicked in and I slid to a stop a) inches away from the person in front of me, and b) hit the person in front of me, but luckily so slowly that there was no damage to either vehicle.

I understand how ABS works and how useful it is, but in those 1-2 seconds it sure is frustrating to have your foot on the break and have the car still moving inexorably towards the guy in front of you.

Then of course my wife cracked the front bumper the next weekend anyway...

Finally, my winter tires are Michelin X-Ice Xi3s. I know they rate extremely high online and people seem to love them, but I haven't been super impressed. My GT slips a lot, on ice, snow, you name it. I'm thinking of tossing some sand bags in my trunk, though I know that would only really help the occasional fishtail.
 

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I think you're being too black-and-white about an issue that is a little grey - maybe very dark grey, but still grey. Every safety system has unusual corners of the envelope where it may not help and might even cause harm. ABS, traction control, and ESC are no different.

In the case of ABS, there are some situations where ABS will lengthen your stopping distance. One is simply that if you're really, really good (and probably get lucky), you may be able to threshold brake right at the point before lockup and get more traction that ABS which has to cycle on/off. Now average drivers on average roads can seldom match ABS, but expert drivers in very predictable conditions can sometimes do better. The beauty of ABS is that it takes no skill to get close to shortest stopping distance - just push as hard as you can on the brakes.

Another situation is the rumble strip one mentioned above. If the braking cycling period and the rumble strip period are well matched, you can get into a situation where the brakes are always cycling off when the wheels have traction and always cycling on when they don't. It's unusual but it can happen.

There's also the situation where in deep snow, you may be able to gain more traction by spinning a wheel (churning your way through the snow) and be able to get more braking by locking a wheel (the snow builds up a dam in front of the locked wheel). Again, not common, but it can happen.

It's the same with seat belts and air bags. Almost all the time, they're beneficial, but there are some situations where they have caused harm.

None of this means these systems aren't generally worthwhile and defeating them should be done only if you have a very specific plan in mind for why you think you can do better without. As you say, the problem with these arguments is that people react to anecdotal situation and think that a safety system made a difference one way or the other, but there is really no way to replay the incident again with or without the system.

- Mark
that is spot-on with my opinion regarding both traction control and ABS.

But I know on a motorcycle equipped with ABS, the stopping distances on gravel roads is longer. Many cyclists have installed a switch or pull the ABS fuse because locking the REAR tire on gravel will slow you down in speed faster than letting ABS find the threshold when driving on the equivalent of ball bearings. (But locking the FRONT tire will crash you faster than you can imagine - making ABS a true benefit on a motorcycle in other conditions.)

ABS lets you retain more steering control in a panic stop, maybe giving a directional 'out' from a collision that you wouldn't get from a skidding locked wheel condition.

But, there are times when starting out from an intersection in snow or ice that spinning the tires would feel better and probably more effective than the Traction Control.

Climbing a slippery hill... the TC works awesome.
The harder you apply the gas... the more the TC applies the brakes while allowing the wheels to turn with minimum/ no slip. Your speed will be painfully slow.... but you can get to the top of the hill and with steering control - minimal side slip towards the curb and without slipping your wheels into a 'speed stall' & side slide.
 

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Not to beat a dead horse here... can any of you provide a video demonstration or other test results that show where traction control is less advantageous?

I looked. The only one I found was an SUV trying to climb a sand dune. Not exactly an everyday driving situation.

At this point, I'm hearing a lot of opinions. And that's cool... I don't want to argue with any of you. I'm just genuinely interested in this topic. This is my first car with a traction/stability system and I want to learn all I can about it.
thanks
b
 

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Not to beat a dead horse here... can any of you provide a video demonstration or other test results that show where traction control is less advantageous?

I looked. The only one I found was an SUV trying to climb a sand dune. Not exactly an everyday driving situation.
Again, there is what is appropriate for "everday situations" and something different for unusual situations. The sand climbing scenario is clear evidence that in some situations where you need to "churn" you way out loose material, you need wheelspin to get traction. Much of the traction you get is due to the flinging of material to the rear (i.e.,Newton's law where each action has equal and opposite reaction). Sand, snow, gravel, etc. are all situations where you may be able to get more traction with some wheelspin. At the extreme, there is rally car driving where the cars are deliberately setup to go sideways through corners with all wheels spinning. I can guarantee you that no rally car has ABS, traction control, or stability control and any car raced with such systems would be miserably slow.

You won't get any argument from me that traction control, ABS, and stability control are valuable and desirable in the vast majority of "everyday situations".

BTW, one interesting aspect of this which has already been mentioned is that traction control/ESC systems are now being used as a poor man's form of limited slip differential (in lieu of more complex mechanical LSD). By braking a slipping wheel, you can transfer torque to a wheel that has traction. So traction control can have the added benefit distributing power between wheels. The downside is extra brake wear and its even possible to overheat brakes pretty badly - some systems have warning lights or stop using this technique if brake overheating is detected.

- Mark
 
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