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My sister has a 2002 Elantra. When i drive it the transmission seems to be pulling. For example if i were to take off to about 35 mph and lift my foot off the gas pedal, the engine tends to continue to stay at the same rpm for a second or so before it actually switches to the 3rd gear. Anyone experience this problem or knows what it might be?
 

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Originally posted by izwizzle@Nov 4 2004, 05:28 PM
My sister has a 2002 Elantra. When i drive it the transmission seems to be pulling. For example if i were to take off to about 35 mph and lift my foot off the gas pedal, the engine tends to continue to stay at the same rpm for a second or so before it actually switches to the 3rd gear. Anyone experience this problem or knows what it might be?
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My '02 Elantra GT (5-speed) has a bit of a sticky gas pedal. I haven't taken the time yet to try and track it down and fix it. Have you noticed anything along those lines with your sister's car? I'm wondering if that could be contributing to the problem.

What is the rpm range when this happens?

I'm fairly ignorant about most mechanical stuff, esp. automatic trannys...hopefully someone more knowledgeable will jump in here with some good advice for you.
 

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So If I understand correctly - you are getting a delayed or harsh 2-3 shift or possibly what is called "shift flare."

Shift flare is where the engine speeds up between shifts. Shifting gets delayed because the trnamsission reacts as though the car is still accelerating.

The Elantra will shift a bit differently when it's cold than when it warms up but it should not be something you would really notice to the point where it feels like something is wrong.

There have been a couple of technical service bulletins issued on this.

TSB 01-40-002 identifies an issue with the automatic transmission's adaptive learning capability causing harsh shifting. The transmission adjusts itself to account for wear over time. In some cases the adaptive learning over or under-compensates for wear and has to be reset. For some reason the problem is often most noticeable in the 2-3 shift.

A dealer will deal with this by disconnecting the battery to reset the adaptive learning to the factory settings and then driving through several 1-2-3-4 shift cycles until the problem corrects itself. This has to be done with the automatic transmisison fluid at full operating temperature.

Some 2002 model-year vehicles (actually built in 2001) need to have a reprogram of the transmission control module (TCM) to correct shift flare.

For you info this applies to 4 Door models Produced from January 3, 2001 through November 21, 2001, VIN KMHDN45D11U11926 to KMHDN45D52U328995 or a 5 Door model Produced from March 22, 2001 through November 21, 2001, VIN KMHDN55D21U020994 to KMHDN55D02U050500.

If you think this might be the case, you (or your sister) should mention TSB 02-40-001 when you take it in. The fix in this case is to use a scanner to update the TCM with new software.

There could be other problems but these are the ones I would start with because they are most common and most easily fixed.

So the bottom line is that it needs to go back to the dealer to be checked out. Someone at the delaership will have to drive the car and try to duplicate the problem for themselves.

One bit of advice is that I've heard some reports of dealers saying "its just the way the car is, get used to it" At that point you may have to get a bit insistent.

Good luck
 

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Hi all,
The 2001 + Elantra's have the new generation auto-boxes. The TCM (tranny computor) has the ability to learn the drivers drive tyle/habits, and will shift accordingly. The TCM is in constant contact with the ECM (engine computor), to see engine load.
A different driver may find the tranny shift weird, till it will adapt to the new driver after some time bit for bit. Then the original driver takes over again, and guess what happen now....... YES, it will adapt again. It can sometimes confuse the TCM a bit, till the more permanent driver has driven again for some time.

The scenario of maintaining the rpm's for a few seconds when you take the foot of the accelerator, is a programming in the ECM for emission purposes. There is a reprogramming patch, which will help, but not fix it 100%.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thats the reason i drove it. She's been complaining about how it shifts. She took it to the dealer she got it from (not a Hyundai dealer) and they told her its normal and that basically she should've expected this from a Hyundai. She wanted to settle for that but i insisted that something was wrong.

BTW thanks gordo for the reply. I told her to take it to the Hyundai dealer a while ago and we are going tomorrow. The TSB was useful info.
 

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I certainly hope you get things resolved. Is it still under 60,000 miles? If so anything major shoud be covered by the limited warranty for subsequent owners.

I know what Duke is talking about with differnt drivers because my sweetie uses the car during the week and I drive it on weekends. I've been told that some Monday mornings the car seems to be "shifting at the wrong times" but this never lasts more than a short while.

Of course, my going-to-work ride is an '83 Civic so driving the Elantra always feels like being in the lap of luxury to me. Her tastes (excluding choice of partner) are somewhat more refined.
 
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