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I was pleasantly surprised yesterday when there was a message on the screen that the battery in the key fob was low; I didn't know that the car was going to alert me. So, I got out my backup key fob today and drove to the battery store to have them replace the battery in the first unit. When I turned off the car it warned me again that the battery was low in key fob I hadn't been using. Seems like the key fobs are identically programmed and so the car couldn't detect that I was carrying two...? Just wondering...
 

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No need to go to the battery store and have them replace the battery for you. This is not a Swiss watch. Go to Amazon, get it for less than half the price, and replace it yourself. It's easy. The process is in the owner's manual.
 
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I was pleasantly surprised yesterday when there was a message on the screen that the battery in the key fob was low; I didn't know that the car was going to alert me. So, I got out my backup key fob today and drove to the battery store to have them replace the battery in the first unit. When I turned off the car it warned me again that the battery was low in key fob I hadn't been using. Seems like the key fobs are identically programmed and so the car couldn't detect that I was carrying two...? Just wondering...
Mine has been saying the message every other day or so for the last 5 months. Key works every time regardless so I'm just going to keep ignoring it until I notice the remote becomes weak
 

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Wonder why I never got that low remote battery warning, even removed the remote battery from my 2017 Limited to learn what happens.


Had to remove the key to unlock the door, and press on the start button with the remote, not finger, that didn't work, car started fine and everything was normal.


Nice to know you can do this if that battery does go dead, but would be dead meat if your car battery was dead.


Can open the remove using the turn part of the key, pops open, but do this over a table, PCB may fly out with the key pad, only goes together one way, Battery is in the other case half, I use a Duracell medical grade 2032, prices on this battery is all over the place. Historically, only good for about a year.
 

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No need to go to the battery store and have them replace the battery for you. This is not a Swiss watch. Go to Amazon, get it for less than half the price, and replace it yourself. It's easy. The process is in the owner's manual.

Normally I do, but the Elantra remotes do not have screws holding the case together. My wife had one done at the dealer and I watched them force it open with a screwdriver blade - it made a disconcerting cracking sound. Since they cost $60> I thought I'd let a shop do it. We're only talking a couple of bucks for labor for a task that only has to be done once a year.
 

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Mine has been saying the message every other day or so for the last 5 months. Key works every time regardless so I'm just going to keep ignoring it until I notice the remote becomes weak

I've done that with other cars where I could fall back on using a regular key (and turn off the alarm after I got inside), but don't care to chance it with the Elantra that is almost completely dependent on the fob for operation. Hopefully the fob won't suddenly fail when the battery reaches a certain level. Let us know when you change yours and why.
 

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Normally I do, but the Elantra remotes do not have screws holding the case together. My wife had one done at the dealer and I watched them force it open with a screwdriver blade - it made a disconcerting cracking sound. Since they cost $60> I thought I'd let a shop do it. We're only talking a couple of bucks for labor for a task that only has to be done once a year.

Ha, I remember screws, least I think I do, sure have enough screwdrivers lying around collecting dust.
 

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Ha, I remember screws, least I think I do, sure have enough screwdrivers lying around collecting dust.

I guess there could be more than one type of key fob, but neither my 2017 Elantra nor my wife's 2016 Sonata fobs have screws. The pieces are designed to snap together somehow. You can still use one of those screwdrivers with a wide blade to pry the fob open though :smile:
 

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Normally I do, but the Elantra remotes do not have screws holding the case together. My wife had one done at the dealer and I watched them force it open with a screwdriver blade - it made a disconcerting cracking sound. Since they cost $60> I thought I'd let a shop do it. We're only talking a couple of bucks for labor for a task that only has to be done once a year.
Every smart key or fob I have had in the last 20 years has snapped together, and they all come apart by prying them open with a screwdriver. The materials are designed to be pried apart, and I have yet to crack one or damage one while doing it. I have not heard of any smart keys or key fobs made by any manufacturer that are held together with screws. Even the ones that have screws are not held together with them. It makes that "snapping" sound because it's snapped together as designed.

From the owner's manual, for the remote:
To replace the battery:
1. Pry open the rear cover of the remote key.
2. Remove the old battery and insert the new battery. Make sure the battery position is correct.
3. Reinstall the rear cover of the remote key.

And for the Smart Key:

To replace the battery:
1. Pry open the rear cover of the smart key.
2. Remove the old battery and insert the new battery.
3. Reinstall the rear cover of the smart key.

While I have it apart, I take the opportunity to run a q-tip along the edges where it pries apart.
 

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Every smart key or fob I have had in the last 20 years has snapped together, and they all come apart by prying them open with a screwdriver. The materials are designed to be pried apart, and I have yet to crack one or damage one while doing it.

Thanks, I do appreciate the instructions and knowing that you've been opening them for a while without problems.



My 2003 Elantra had key-less entry, but no alarm. When the original fobs failed I had an aftermarket alarm system installed and those key fobs were screwed together, so this is the first time I've had fobs that snap together. It's not just about getting the fob apart without breaking it; there's also not wanting to damage the finish, but whatever. Maybe next time I'll try it....or not. The savings of doing it myself is insignificant. I have plenty of battery powered watches and other devices that I get the satisfaction of maintaining myself.
 

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I was pleasantly surprised yesterday when there was a message on the screen that the battery in the key fob was low; I didn't know that the car was going to alert me. So, I got out my backup key fob today and drove to the battery store to have them replace the battery in the first unit. When I turned off the car it warned me again that the battery was low in key fob I hadn't been using. Seems like the key fobs are identically programmed and so the car couldn't detect that I was carrying two...? Just wondering...
If your car is using a smart key they are always using battery 24/7 because they are sending the signal all the time so it is very normal for them to both go out close to each other.
 

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Mine has been saying the message every other day or so for the last 5 months. Key works every time regardless so I'm just going to keep ignoring it until I notice the remote becomes weak

I've done that with other cars where I could fall back on using a regular key (and turn off the alarm after I got inside), but don't care to chance it with the Elantra that is almost completely dependent on the fob for operation. Hopefully the fob won't suddenly fail when the battery reaches a certain level. Let us know when you change yours and why.
This morning is the first time I got in and pushed the button and it didn't start. The screen displayed and image showing to press the remote against the start button and push it to start and it worked. Incase anyone didn't know when the battery dies
 

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Normally I do, but the Elantra remotes do not have screws holding the case together. My wife had one done at the dealer and I watched them force it open with a screwdriver blade - it made a disconcerting cracking sound. Since they cost $60> I thought I'd let a shop do it. We're only talking a couple of bucks for labor for a task that only has to be done once a year.
So either the shop can open it and it makes a cracking sound, or you can open it and it will make the same sound ;-) The remote will make it regardless of who opens it, it won't break simply because it knows who's opening it. Plus, a shop tech is going to be less gentle with your remote than you will. Let it make that noise and don't worry too much. I have yet to hear of anyone breaking their FOB's on this forum by replacing the battery.
 

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Screwdriver will leave dents in that open end, using the key with that rounded head, to twist it to open the case halves will not leave dents.
 

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Every smart key or fob I have had in the last 20 years has snapped together, and they all come apart by prying them open with a screwdriver. The materials are designed to be pried apart, and I have yet to crack one or damage one while doing it. I have not heard of any smart keys or key fobs made by any manufacturer that are held together with screws. Even the ones that have screws are not held together with them. It makes that "snapping" sound because it's snapped together as designed.

From the owner's manual, for the remote:
To replace the battery:
1. Pry open the rear cover of the remote key.
2. Remove the old battery and insert the new battery. Make sure the battery position is correct.
3. Reinstall the rear cover of the remote key.

And for the Smart Key:

To replace the battery:
1. Pry open the rear cover of the smart key.
2. Remove the old battery and insert the new battery.
3. Reinstall the rear cover of the smart key.

While I have it apart, I take the opportunity to run a q-tip along the edges where it pries apart.
I just tried replacing the battery in my key fob, 2017 Elantra Limited. I may have ruined it. A prior message saying that the circuit board and battery may just fall out didn't happen that way. The board in this one had to be persuaded to come out, because the battery is connected to the circuit board by contacts at the edge, but the battery is also retained by one side of the fob. The board would not just lift out. So I had to pry with a tiny screwdriver under the battery. When it all finally came out, it wasn't clear which way the battery had been installed. Inside the fob is an outline of the battery with a (-). So does that mean (-) next to the case or next to the board? Tried it both ways, which probably killed the fob. Can't get it to work either way. Has to be the most user unfriendly setup I've ever come across. A setup like this should have some kind of reverse polarity protection IMHO.
 

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Well, it finally went back together in working order! Main problem was keeping the battery in the connections underneath the circuit board while guiding it into the snap-in on the fob. Hardly the most user friendly procedure. I didn't have that much trouble replacing the solid state hard drive on this laptop, LOL!
 

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My 2017 Elantra has been giving me the low battery warning on the dash for about a year. I gave it no nevermind as it wasn't causing problems. Now for the past 2 weeks, 1 out of 5 starts requires me to put the key on the push button start to start the car. This tells me that the battery is extremely low. However, it is curious that the fob can still lock/unlock the car from about 125 feet way through walls. Needless to say, I do have a battery I'm going to replace today.
 

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interesting. I wouldn't want to risk being stranded somewhere, so I replace mine as soon as the dash message comes up.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
My 2017 Elantra has been giving me the low battery warning on the dash for about a year. I gave it no nevermind as it wasn't causing problems. Now for the past 2 weeks, 1 out of 5 starts requires me to put the key on the push button start to start the car. This tells me that the battery is extremely low. However, it is curious that the fob can still lock/unlock the car from about 125 feet way through walls. Needless to say, I do have a battery I'm going to replace today.
Yeah, there's no point in putting up with the start up issue given how inexpensive and easy it is to just replace the battery (y)
 

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Walmart around here wants $9.98 for a 4 pack of Duracell 2032 batteries, Got the identical pack, US seller off of ebay for $4.88 with free shipping.

Just had to replace our batteries, key in the slot by reversing it popped opened the case halves. Printed circuit board will fall out, but open the case with those 4 push buttons facing down.

On the other side of the case holds the battery, even now I cannot recall if the + side of the battery faces up or down, but sure look at the one that is in there to get the proper direction and does have to be pried out with a small jewelers screw driver.

Do this with washed fingers not to leave prints on the battery, does snap in easily. Case halves snap together with fingers, leave the push button side down.
 
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