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Seems to be associated with cold climates & winter, would dropping to zero weight (0w20) year round retard this a bit?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just so everyone knows, my daughter went to college in Winona, MN. And the years when she was there it was crazy cold. I think the cold ambient temperatures is a contributing factor.

I will have to post some pictures of the new short block, it has oil squirters under the pistons and the block is sleeved, both upgrades I'm sure. The original block had castings for the oil passages for the squirters, but they are not machined or squirters installed.

You can see the squirter and the cylinder sleeve in the picture below.

 

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It's a fact that pistons fit tighter in the bore when the engine is cold.
There are Formula 1 racing engines that have to be pre-heated before they can be cranked to start.

I had a '81 Accord. When it had ~180K miles on the clock I started it in -20F temps (exceptionally cold for my region.)
Although I let it warm up a few minutes my heart sunk because it had a misfire that did not go away.
A couple weeks later opened up the engine and one of the pistons had shattered ring lands.
Luckily hadn't driven it enough to score the cylinder walls.
 

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Nice explanation, I can hear a small tick on startup in the cold, yet My old Camry had a lot of clatter too yet took me to 138k and the second owner upwards closer to 200k.

Correct me then...
This seems like this went on over several model years, more prone to (but not limited) to the Alabama built blocks.

Hyundai apparently knew about it and had no fix. And if I would take it in to the dealer I'd just be out the $ 150 diagnostic fee, and told this is normal?

I see a new designed short block with extra ports and oilers in the video, when was this implemented? From what I read they just use the same block and the process starts over again in a warranty repair?

Now I don't drive that much 4-6k a year I been using my other vehicle in the snow and salt, but likely it will not be around next winter. After seeing this I really want to change the oil myself to take a look at what is coming out of it.... I had planned on it anyway but in warmer weather.

it gets to a point to when these repairs exceed wholesale trade value or even market value. I see locally a MD in white with cancer in the front fenders already unfortunately I believe this one may be an 11-13 though I'm not an expert in discerning the years.

So Dr. Speed over at Summit Racing lied then years ago telling us to pack our engine bay's with coolers and ice packs before racing? 🤔
 

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It's a fact that pistons fit tighter in the bore when the engine is cold.
There are Formula 1 racing engines that have to be pre-heated before they can be cranked to start.


I had a '81 Accord. When it had ~180K miles on the clock I started it in -20F temps (exceptionally cold for my region.)
Although I let it warm up a few minutes my heart sunk because it had a misfire that did not go away.
A couple weeks later opened up the engine and one of the pistons had shattered ring lands.
Luckily hadn't driven it enough to score the cylinder walls.
I think you have that backwards. Pistons always fit tighter when hot, and looser when cold.
 

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That engine has been overheated. The comment about the piston being larger when cold is incorrect. Piston slap is loudest when cold and quietens as the engine warms up.
 

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That doesn't take into account the cylinder also changes size with temp.

"Most pistons are made of aluminum, and when they're cold, they are at their smallest. As the metal heats up, it expands and fits tighter in the cylinder bore."
Piston Slap Noise and Excessive Bore Clearance
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So when I put the engine in two weeks ago, I had a mechanical issue that was not easy to troubleshoot. It basically wouldn't run, it couldn't turn over the car with the plugs installed. Long story short, I put the flex plate on backwards and that plate had to flex (at great mechanical torque) to turn the engine over. Ended up figuring that out last weekend and then pulled the engine again and turned the plate around....all is good now. Engine is SO SMOOTH and QUIET. It runs awesome.

 

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Good to see all that work produce good results. I'm a little confused, did you buy a new short block from Hyundai or did you have a different used engine turned out .020 inches new pistons etc? If you went the used route, why not rebuild the original block? Hyundai cover the cost of any of this?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I ended up buying a used engine and transmission for $500. I took it apart, then brought it to a machine shop. After trying to find pistons/rings/bearings, etc. and figuring out that you could buy a short block for $920 from a local dealer through their wholesale side, I told the machine shop to stop work on the block and bought the short block from Hyundai. I had the head skimmed, valve seals replaced and pressure tested.

Because I bought the car with a rebuilt title, Hyundai did not pay for anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
My 25 year old son came into town to help out, it really didn't take very long to get it out or get it back in, but it took quite a bit of time to figure out the flex plate was installed backwards! LOL.

445672
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I took the front core support off, so something like this:

Remove all splash shields
Remove bumper
Drain coolant
Remove all electrical connectors from front end, ECU, transmission and power panel on driver's fender
Remove battery and air box
Remove radiator hoses and heater hoses from firewall
Remove two exhaust manifold bolts, swing exhaust out of place with flex pipe
Unbolt flex plate to torque converter (4 bolts 90 degrees apart)
Jack up transmission with jack
Remove bumper support
Remove headlights
Remove radiator core support bolts (I bought a new one on rockauto because mine was rusted and the splash shields screws wouldn't screw in/out)
Remove radiator and condenser, separate condenser, it can be moved out of core support (bought a new radiator also, why not? It's $70 on rockauto)
Remove the two transmission hoses for cooler
Remove AC compressor, swing out of way
Remove one little bolt holding AC line to body on front of engine
Remove alternator, was just easier
Remove windshield wipers
Remove windshield wiper plastic cowl assembly
Install engine hoist on engine, put load on it
Remove front engine mount on passenger side
Unbolt transmission from engine
Swing engine a bit, it should separate easily
Pull it out the front of the car

I made a Google photo album of some of the pictures, I have about 200 more....but you can view them here:

 

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Wow.. you have patience..and skill. I would never attempt such a project...I am very happy with my 2011 Elantra..80K Korean builts. Runs flawless. I also use 5W-30 Conventional oil.
 
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