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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

Had my 185 diesel in with the dealer and asked them about the exhaust warning light that came on 3 times, then went off on a restart.

They said it had registered as needing a burn cycle and they did a manual one.

The vehicle is 1.5 years old and has done 15,000 miles - mix of town and motorway.

Hyundai said a burn could be initiated by holding at around 3000 RPM.

My question is: how long? Until the light goes out (will it spontaneously go out?)

The other question is: do I need to put tons of electrical load on to make the engine work harder (another manufacturer told me to do this with their diesel).

I find the whole DPF burn a bit voodoo. Be so much nicer if it offered clear feedback:

1) DPF burn needed, please drive at 3000RPM when convenient;

2) Burn initiated, please maintain this driving style;

3) Burn complete.

Cheers :)

Tim
 

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Hi Tim.

A DPF regen cycle is limited to about 10mins due to the very high temperatures generated during the regen. I've never had any dealings with DPF on Hyundai but when I have a car in need of a regen I usually just take it for a drive on the motorway at 50MPH in 4th gear. No extra electrical load on (I've never heard of that before). On the cars I've worked on that have had a regen warning light (not all do), the light has just switched off once the regen is complete. I find it will usually switch off after 5~6miles. I think the most important thing when doing a regen is having 5~6 miles of clear road because you want to try and maintain a constant throttle setting. It wont work if your having to constantly move the throttle pedal.

Your right, some feedback on how the regen is progressing would be nice. I usually monitor it on my diagnostic scan tool just so I know there is actually something happening. Not all cars provide feedback even via the scan tool though.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Tim.

A DPF regen cycle is limited to about 10mins due to the very high temperatures generated during the regen. I've never had any dealings with DPF on Hyundai but when I have a car in need of a regen I usually just take it for a drive on the motorway at 50MPH in 4th gear. No extra electrical load on (I've never heard of that before). On the cars I've worked on that have had a regen warning light (not all do), the light has just switched off once the regen is complete. I find it will usually switch off after 5~6miles. I think the most important thing when doing a regen is having 5~6 miles of clear road because you want to try and maintain a constant throttle setting. It wont work if your having to constantly move the throttle pedal.
Hi mate,

10 minutes? That's very useful info - thanks. Yes, I has another German manufacturer tell me to thrash it around a couple of junctions of the M25 (talking a 30 mile kinda thrash there). Seemed excessive. Hyundai didn't seem very sure in the dealer either - they suggested a short thrash every week (also seemed excessive).


Your right, some feedback on how the regen is progressing would be nice. I usually monitor it on my diagnostic scan tool just so I know there is actually something happening. Not all cars provide feedback even via the scan tool though.
That's a good idea - next time it comes on I'll stick my ODBlink in and see if the Torque Android app can see the DPF temperature (it has a widget - it's whether it sees data or not). Thanks - I never thought of that - but having been on youtube after you mentioned it, I see watching the DPF temperature while driving seems to be a standard method of watching a burn happen.

Many many thanks!

Tim
 

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If you monitor the EGR valve duty that is usually a good indicator that a regen has started. EGR is used to lower combustion temperatures which is the exact opposite to what the ECU wants during a regen, so it will shut the EGR system down while the regen is in progress. With the EGR shut down you should then see the EGTs start to rise. The EGTs need to be somewhere between 500~600 'C to burn off the soot that's trapped in the filter.
 
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