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We just had our 45k service done and they said my wife's battery CCAs are low, which I believe, but they wanted over $220 to replace the battery! They tried to tell her that not only are their batteries superior, but that the Santa Fe needs a different battery than the normal batteries you get at Sams or Auto Zone.

Is there really anything special required for these cars, or am I relegated to paying a premium for a battery that should have lasted longer than 2 years and 3 mos?
Thanks in advance.
 

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That sounds weird. I use the Walmart Everstart batteries in my cars and bought the group 124R battery for my 2013 Santa Fe as specified by their battery finder. According to that, the 2018 uses a 124R too.
 

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That sounds weird. I use the Walmart Everstart batteries in my cars and bought the group 124R battery for my 2013 Santa Fe as specified by their battery finder. According to that, the 2018 uses a 124R too.
about a year ago put the Wal Mart battery in our 2013 replacing the original. I think it was ~ $90 but I opened a Walmart credit account which took $25 off that cost. I believe their batts are made by Johnson Controls - one of the largest mfgs in the biz.
Some vehicles use special batteries (deep cycle) if they are equipped with the stop/start idle feature, but if you don't have that a regular lead acid battery will work and if you have the stop/start feature you can get the battery cheaper than at the dealer.
 

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Simple answer. No. The Santa Fe does not use a special battery. Just a standard lead acid normal group size you can purchase at any auto parts store.
 

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I replaced my 2015 Santa Fe battery with Walmart Maxx EverStart battery label P/N MAXX-124R CCA (A) 700 which I believe is Exide SX124R Capacity (AH) 64 (20HR). Attached are side by side comparison photo and a cheat-sheet for the battery replacement.
 

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The stock battery is a calcium battery, a type of lead-acid battery. I'd stick to that if, like me, you experience severe winters. If where you live has a mild climate I wouldn't worry about battery type.
 

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Older vehicles ran on flooded batteries. Many newer ones run of AGM (Absorbed glass mat) batteries. You need to verify which type you have and that is the type you MUST use. Do not substitute a conventional flooded battery for an AGM battery (AGM batteries are more expensive) as you will have a premature failure. AGM batteries are usually identified as such right on the top battery label. Whoever you buy from should also be able to tell you which battery you require.

Personally, I have had good luck with original equipment / Hyundai sold batteries, but I also change mine out every four years because I do NOT want to get stranded when it finally gives up...
 

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I'm surprised your OE battery lasted such a short time. I still have the original battery in my 2013 which the dealer tested back in March and said it's still going strong. We have severe winters here and a lot of my trips are short.
 

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Say what you want about Chrysler/Dodge/Mopar, but the stock battery in my 2010 Caliber lasted eight winters before I decided it was time to change it.

It wasn't showing any signs of weakness either. Started that car in -30 C weather with just six cranks.

If anything, newer batteries should perform even better than that.
 

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Say what you want about Chrysler/Dodge/Mopar, but the stock battery in my 2010 Caliber lasted eight winters before I decided it was time to change it.

It wasn't showing any signs of weakness either. Started that car in -30 C weather with just six cranks.

If anything, newer batteries should perform even better than that.
I always find Ford batteries to be terrible. They give up even in SoCal warm weather after 3 years if your lucky.

my buddy had an Audi Q7 and his battery was under the drivers seat. Was a special battery that cost him $750 from the dealer - only place he could get it. 😳

I am glad that Hyundai stuck with simple and durable.
 

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Older vehicles ran on flooded batteries. Many newer ones run of AGM (Absorbed glass mat) batteries. You need to verify which type you have and that is the type you MUST use. Do not substitute a conventional flooded battery for an AGM battery (AGM batteries are more expensive) as you will have a premature failure. AGM batteries are usually identified as such right on the top battery label. Whoever you buy from should also be able to tell you which battery you require.

Personally, I have had good luck with original equipment / Hyundai sold batteries, but I also change mine out every four years because I do NOT want to get stranded when it finally gives up...
According to a chart that Hyundai published, the Santa Fe from 2019 on, used AGM whereas the Santa Fe Sport used AGM starting in 2017.
443391
 

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Thanks all for the info!
I believe my old Ford Escort Wagon battery lasted about 5 years before it died (conveniently in the parking garage at work).

My 2005 Chevy POS Equinox battery lasted 4 years before croaking.

Roomate's 2013 Hyundai SFS just died last year, so that would've been about 5 years.
 
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