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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
cool down before shutting it off? I have learned to do this on my F250 Turbo Diesel due to the EGT's (Exhaust Gas Temps) and the heat developed in the turbine housing and bearing. The problem is that the oil will coak or cook in the bearing shaft and housing if the temp. is hotter than the flashpoint of the oil. The better the oil, the less potential problems you will have which is why Hyundai recommends using the 5/40 European type oil in the 2.0 Turbo engine due to heat.
Flash point is the temperature at which an oil gives off vapors that can be ignited with a flame held over the oil. The lower the flash point the greater tendancy for the oil to suffer vaporization loss at high temperatures and to burn off on hot cylinder walls and pistons. The flash point can be an indicator of the quality of the base stock used. The higher the flash point the better. 400 F is the minimum to prevent possible high consumption. Flash point is in degrees F. This is another reason I'm using Amsoil in my 2.0T. But anyway, I sent an email to Hyundai about letting the turbo cool for a minute or so because I didnt see anything in the owners manual about this. Here is what I wrote and this is what they sent back. Wanted to share this with you guys.
Subject: Hyundai Customer Support
Message: We just bought a 2011 Sonata Limited 2.0T. My question has to do with Turbo EGT's and if it is advisable to let engine idle to cool down the turbo. Oil flash point is usually between 350 and 450 degrees, turbo EGT's can exceed these temperatures. I didnt see anything in the owners manual and wanted to know if Hyundai has any test results or advise on this year and model. Thank you!</span><span style="color:#000080">

"We are happy to provide you with an update to your case regarding gas temperatures as it relates to the turbo in your 2011 Hyundai Sonata 2.0T.

The Turbocharger in your vehicle is both oil cooled and water cooled. There is a dedicated air-to-air intercooler for cooling the turbo charged air. Your Sonata 2.0T also has a cooling fan that turns on when the engine is turned off with coolant at a very high temperature. However, it is always good practice to idle the vehicle for a least a minute or two if driven very hard prior to parking. We hope you enjoy your 2011 Sonata 2.0T for many miles to come.

Thank you for contacting Hyundai Consumer Affairs."
 

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QUOTE (DWPTECH @ Dec 24 2010, 05:22 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=383183
cool down before shutting it off? I have learned to do this on my F250 Turbo Diesel due to the EGT's (Exhaust Gas Temps) and the heat developed in the turbine housing and bearing. The problem is that the oil will coak or cook in the bearing shaft and housing. The better the oil the less potential problems you will have which is why Hyundai recommends using the 5/40 oil in the 2.0 Turbo engine due to heat.
Flash point is the temperature at which an oil gives off vapors that can be ignited with a flame held over the oil. The lower the flash point the greater tendancy for the oil to suffer vaporization loss at high temperatures and to burn off on hot cylinder walls and pistons. The flash point can be an indicator of the quality of the base stock used. The higher the flash point the better. 400 F is the minimum to prevent possible high consumption. Flash point is in degrees F. This is another reason I'm using Amsoil in my 2.0T. But anyway, I sent an email to Hyundai about the importance of letting the turbo cool for a minute or so because I didnt see anything in the owners manual about this. Here is what they sent back. Wanted to share this with you guys.

"We are happy to provide you with an update to your case regarding gas temperatures as it relates to the turbo in your 2011 Hyundai Sonata 2.0T.

The Turbocharger in your vehicle is both oil cooled and water cooled. There is a dedicated air-to-air intercooler for cooling the turbo charged air. Your Sonata 2.0T also has a cooling fan that turns on when the engine is turned off with coolant at a very high temperature. However, it is always good practice to idle the vehicle for a least a minute or two if driven very hard prior to parking. We hope you enjoy your 2011 Sonata 2.0T for many miles to come.

Thank you for contacting Hyundai Consumer Affairs."
Good evening Al,

Cool down?! I have been driving that Venetian red rocket non-stop since Tuesday.

Gosh Al, your scholarship is almost like a time when one of my daughter's was younger (32 now). She went to her mother and asked a question, Pam said to her, "Go ask your dad." Emily responded, "I didn't want to know that much about it!" Just a little joke on Christmas Eve.

I do appreciate the education. During this past month, as I did my homework on the Sonata, I read several articles about allowing a brief cool down time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
QUOTE (BillSiegrist @ Dec 24 2010, 08:14 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=383195
Good evening Al,

Cool down?! I have been driving that Venetian red rocket non-stop since Tuesday.

Gosh Al, your scholarship is almost like a time when one of my daughter's was younger (32 now). She went to her mother and asked a question, Pam said to her, "Go ask your dad." Emily responded, "I didn't want to know that much about it!" Just a little joke on Christmas Eve.

I do appreciate the education. During this past month, as I did my homework on the Sonata, I read several articles about allowing a brief cool down time.
You know Bill, no one has ever told me to shut up as nicely as you just did! :grin: My apologies to anyone else for my long winded explanations and opinions. I have had too many years in the high performance/automotive field and have made more mistakes than I could ever count! My signature, "No one ever learned anything by doing it right the first time" is my life in a nutshell! But through all of those mistakes and experiences I have learned a lot. I dont believe that knowledge and experience should be kept, it should be shared. I try to do that with as many people as I can. If just one person benefits from it in a positive way, it's worth it. Not trying to sound like a blow-hard, just trying to help and some times I over simplify things because of past experiences with people not understanding why things are the way they are. It's the details that most people leave out, and it's those details that are so important to know. I know you were just messing with me Bill, I think! :whistling:
 

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The 'coking' of oil in turbo bearings used to be a cause for concern. A good description of coking can be found here:

http://www.exxonmobil.com/lubes/exxonmobil..._OilCoking1.pdf

Over the years we have had later 1980s and early '90s Mazda 626s with their marvelous turbo 4, a cool down was always recommended. Those cars and our turbo fitted Saabs, 1987, 1996 and 1999 never had a turbo or turbo bearing problem.

Times have changed, manufacturers responded to the "run it and turn it off" attitude most of us follow in our lives and did what Hyundai has done, after shut off cooling.

If you drive hard and I mean really hard but have a mile or so of slower residential roads before you pull into your drive that period will serve to cool today's turbos.

Changing oil at the manufacturer's recommended intervals and using the manufacturer's oil weight and filter recommendations will ensure the whole drive train will last. Have fun out there, Hyundai has made a rather remarkable engine for us to enjoy.
 

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QUOTE (DWPTECH @ Dec 25 2010, 12:57 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=383239
You know Bill, no one has ever told me to shut up as nicely as you just did! :grin: My apologies to anyone else for my long winded explanations and opinions. I have had too many years in the high performance/automotive field and have made more mistakes than I could ever count! My signature, "No one ever learned anything by doing it right the first time" is my life in a nutshell! But through all of those mistakes and experiences I have learned a lot. I dont believe that knowledge and experience should be kept, it should be shared. I try to do that with as many people as I can. If just one person benefits from it in a positive way, it's worth it. Not trying to sound like a blow-hard, just trying to help and some times I over simplify things because of past experiences with people not understanding why things are the way they are. It's the details that most people leave out, and it's those details that are so important to know. I know you were just messing with me Bill, I think! :whistling:
My six year old red headed grandson, Sam, told me a story recently. Apparently the reaction on my face had the hoped for outcome he was expecting. He responded, "I am just messing with you granddaddy."

Yes Al, just messing with you; no, "shut-up" intended. My favorite quote: "Change is a given ... growth is a choice." Sounds similar to your signature. Having way to much Germanic DNA flowing thru my clogged arteries, I appreciate thorough explanations. Keep'em coming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE (dfitz @ Dec 27 2010, 11:13 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=383731
The 'coking' of oil in turbo bearings used to be a cause for concern. A good description of coking can be found here:

http://www.exxonmobil.com/lubes/exxonmobil..._OilCoking1.pdf

Over the years we have had later 1980s and early '90s Mazda 626s with their marvelous turbo 4, a cool down was always recommended. Those cars and our turbo fitted Saabs, 1987, 1996 and 1999 never had a turbo or turbo bearing problem.

Times have changed, manufacturers responded to the "run it and turn it off" attitude most of us follow in our lives and did what Hyundai has done, after shut off cooling.

If you drive hard and I mean really hard but have a mile or so of slower residential roads before you pull into your drive that period will serve to cool today's turbos.

Changing oil at the manufacturer's recommended intervals and using the manufacturer's oil weight and filter recommendations will ensure the whole drive train will last. Have fun out there, Hyundai has made a rather remarkable engine for us to enjoy.
I totally agree with you and thank you for your response! Just wanted to see what Hyundai's thought was on this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (BillSiegrist @ Dec 27 2010, 12:38 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=383752
My six year old red headed grandson, Sam, told me a story recently. Apparently the reaction on my face had the hoped for outcome he was expecting. He responded, "I am just messing with you granddaddy."

Yes Al, just messing with you; no, "shut-up" intended. My favorite quote: "Change is a given ... growth is a choice." Sounds similar to your signature. Having way to much Germanic DNA flowing thru my clogged arteries, I appreciate thorough explanations. Keep'em coming.
Thanks Bill!
 
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