Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm sick of getting mucked around and being told BS from my dealer, bugger 'em.

I want to do the 37,500 km service myself, according to the service booklet it is "Optional" and involves just an oil change and filters.

There's a few posts about petrol Accent owners doing their own basic servicing but looking at the Owners Manual there are a few extra tricks for the diesel motor regarding the fuel filter but there's no useful info on changing the oil.

Any advice please ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,851 Posts
By law in the US, you can do your own maintenance per the schedule so long as you keep records and use Hyundai spec filters, etc. and it won't invalidate your warranty. Can't say if the same applies down under, but at least if I were you I'd be using Hyundai filters only and keep a log.

Changing oil is regarded as a no brainer generally, thus the lack of instructions. Perhaps try youtube. I'm sure somebody changed the oil in that motor and recorded it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
538 Posts
Road Trash, if you can change the oil on a petrol you can change it on a U2 Diesel, piece of pie. The sump drain is accessible through the under car 'skid' plate, don't even need to take that off. The oil filter is a brilliant design, providing your dealer hasn't been forcing the wrong cartridge in it it's dead easy and very clean to change. The only 'inside tip' is before you start to unscrew the filter cover unplug the electrical connector for the intake throttling valve first and tuck it out of the way, as this connector which is right over the filter will prevent you from cleanly sliding out the filter without making a mess. I use the correct size socket and an 300mm extension bar, this lets me keep the ratchet handle above the radiator so there is no chance of clumsy me damaging anything. The filter cover is a standard thread, anti clockwise to undo, it's also a long thread about 20mm, another reason for the extension bar, once it's loose you can spin the ratchet handle easily. Once free lift the cover straight up, the filter cartridge is held captive in the cover, brilliant design, and comes out cleanly without a drop of oil being lost. Replace all the o rings, which should come with the new filter, there is a large ring on the filter cover, and a small one not obvious, on the lower end of the 'spear' that holds the cartridge. If you stop for a coffee while the sump drains, the whole job takes about 30 minutes. You will also find the sump holds 5 Litres exactly, not 5.4 litres, as in the manual, and the dealer insists on overfilling to.
PS fuel filter does not need to be changed at 37000, even under severe service. Normal service life for this is 30,000 klm. Severe duty 15,000, 'or as needed'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank Ray, your detailed advice is appreciated.

I have been having rear brake issues with my car and took it in for a service today where the filter and oil were changed. Now they have found the front brakes have problems dammit.

I am getting sick of the lack of interest Hyundai has showed with what I would have thought were warranty issues.

If I do keep this car I will be doing routine maintenance myself and your helpful tips will be employed, thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
538 Posts
In my opinion most brake problems on these cars are caused by the ESP system. Everything from rapid rear on rear pads, (30,000klm is considered normal) to strange gurgling noises as you press the brake pedal. I turn off the ESP straight after starting the car, everytime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Did my second oil and oil filter change yesterday and thank you Ray for your excellent advice.

Couple of things I'd like to add. Undoing the filter cover was the hardest part of the job as it needs quite a bit of oomph to get it moving and you WILL need a decent 27 mm socket and an extension.

My filter didn't come off with the cover, it was firmly held inside the body of the filter assembly, but came out easily with a little twist. For those in OZ the filter was available over the counter at an auto supplies shop, part # WCO 115, and came with the O rings and a crush washer for the 17 mm sump drain bolt.

This time I took the advice of the bloke at the auto shop and used Penrite 5 W - 40 HPR Diesel 5

It's funny how a car always feels and sounds so much better after an oil change :) BTW the old oil was as black as coal, much blacker than used oil from a petrol motor changed after a similar distance/time.

Yes, the filler stick shows exactly full with 5.0 Litres, 5.4 would be excessive.

Mine has done almost 60,000 kms, with about 90 % on the highway in top gear at just under 2,100 rpm. I expect this motor will last forever under such low stress conditions.

Next job will be a fuel filter change,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Hopefully will try this Diy as soon as my parts arrive. Very excited to do it myself as it's more satisfying and one wouldn't have to worry about the incompetent service center guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Oil change with pics

So I finally did the oil change yesterday. Thanks to the explanation above, it was a breeze. I have attached pics below so that it's easy for others to do it too.

The oil filter removal was pretty easy. It slid out easily once the cover was loosened. It didn't get stuck anywhere.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,918 Posts
Stanjohn,nice pics,I am sure this will help someone doing this for the first time.....:thumbsup:
 

·
Senior Menmber
Joined
·
2,134 Posts
So I finally did the oil change yesterday. Thanks to the explanation above, it was a breeze. I have attached pics below so that it's easy for others to do it too.

The oil filter removal was pretty easy. It slid out easily once the cover was loosened. It didn't get stuck anywhere.
Thanks for taking the time to post your pics. Doncha just love the drop-in filter rather than the screw on kind? My Azera has one and I really like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
For oil change first of all you must have maintenance equipment like proper amount and grade of motor oil, high quality oil filter, socket wrench, oil filter wrench, a funnel, something to catch the motor oil like oil pan or bucket. At second step you have to drain the old motor oil, third step- Replace the oil filter, fourth step- add the new motor oil and lastly clean up and recycle your mobile oil. You must write up when you changed oil, so that you know the next date for changing oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Did another oil and oil filter change on my diesel motor last week.

Noticed that when the old filter cartidge was removed there was some oil sitting in the housing.

Got a length of thin PVC tubing and sucked out about 80 ml of black oil from the housing.

OK, 80 ml is no big deal but glad I had removed it - better out than leaving it in there I reckon.

Another thing I do which others may disagree with. When the old oil has drained, before I replace the drain plug I start and run the motor for four or five seconds. This gets a few more mls of old oil outa the motor.

Have now done over 93,500 km on this car with regular oil changes every 7,500 kms of mainly highway driving. The motor burns VERY LITTLE oil between changes. This pleases me greatly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Did another oil and oil filter change just now. The oil filter always comes with a new alloy crush washer, a big O-ring for the cover and two small O-rings.

One of these small O-rings goes over the central plastic ''stick'' but so far I haven't been able to work out where the second small one goes. Any clues?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Road Trash, if you can change the oil on a petrol you can change it on a U2 Diesel, piece of pie. The sump drain is accessible through the under car 'skid' plate, don't even need to take that off. The oil filter is a brilliant design, providing your dealer hasn't been forcing the wrong cartridge in it it's dead easy and very clean to change. The only 'inside tip' is before you start to unscrew the filter cover unplug the electrical connector for the intake throttling valve first and tuck it out of the way, as this connector which is right over the filter will prevent you from cleanly sliding out the filter without making a mess. I use the correct size socket and an 300mm extension bar, this lets me keep the ratchet handle above the radiator so there is no chance of clumsy me damaging anything. The filter cover is a standard thread, anti clockwise to undo, it's also a long thread about 20mm, another reason for the extension bar, once it's loose you can spin the ratchet handle easily. Once free lift the cover straight up, the filter cartridge is held captive in the cover, brilliant design, and comes out cleanly without a drop of oil being lost. Replace all the o rings, which should come with the new filter, there is a large ring on the filter cover, and a small one not obvious, on the lower end of the 'spear' that holds the cartridge. If you stop for a coffee while the sump drains, the whole job takes about 30 minutes. You will also find the sump holds 5 Litres exactly, not 5.4 litres, as in the manual, and the dealer insists on overfilling to.
PS fuel filter does not need to be changed at 37000, even under severe service. Normal service life for this is 30,000 klm. Severe duty 15,000, 'or as needed'.
:liebe011: That was really helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
So after a very long time and few oil changes on my Accent, I have made a video review of the oil change Diy. You can watch it below and I hope it helps someone planning to do this Diy.

 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top