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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone been able to confirm (or possibly seen) a 2011 Santa Fe with the diesel engine?
I know they are available outside the states already, but I read online somewhere that we would get them with the 2011 model year.

And, given the option, would you take the diesel over the gas, with the diesel making significantly more torque than the gas engine?
 

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I wouldn't buy a diesel unless I planned on towing all the time. And if I planned on towing, I wouldn't buy a Santa Fe. Diesel makes sense in Europe because diesel fuel is a lot cheaper... like 30% or more cheaper. In the US diesel makes no sense because it's 15 or 20% more. And you can't convert it to biodiesel because of the new "clean" diesel standard.
 

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It's pretty simple. Santa Fe was not designed as a work truck. The transmission and suspension are not built for it. It's ok for towing once and a while, but if you demand heavy duty towing with a diesel motor, then consider a Ford or something.
 

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Work truck and casual ownership towing are two totally different animals. The 1st Gen Santa Fe with the diesel had a tow rating of 5,500 pounds in Europe, compared with the 3,000 pound maximum for the 3.5 FWD here. The frame can handle it; it's just that the gas engines don't produce sufficient torque to get the job done.
 

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QUOTE (jsinton @ Jun 22 2010, 02:45 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=335288
I wouldn't buy a diesel unless I planned on towing all the time. And if I planned on towing, I wouldn't buy a Santa Fe. Diesel makes sense in Europe because diesel fuel is a lot cheaper... like 30% or more cheaper. In the US diesel makes no sense because it's 15 or 20% more. And you can't convert it to biodiesel because of the new "clean" diesel standard.
Diesel in the UK is more expensive than petrol!!

You cannot purchase a Santa Fe 2010 model in petrol guise.

I have the 2010 diesel 2.2 litre It does 0 to 62 mph in 9.8 secs and the mid range power acceleration and torque is comparable to some Hot Hatches, currently I'm attaining 37.5 to the UK gallon, which ain't bad for a 4x4 housebrick.

Most UK drivers find them great for towing.

Gazza!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'd tend to agree though, I wouldn't buy a Santa Fe as a primary tow vehicle either. I wouldn't even consider it unless a diesel was available.
Not because I don't think it could handle it necessarily but more because of the limits it has for towing.
It's fine for an occasional trip to the lumber yard, helping a friend move, etc, but I wouldn't use it as a work truck.

Not to mention how sick you will be the first time you hit the tail end with the trailer hitch. :)

I was thinking more along of the lines of how my 2.7l just feels underpowered for a vehicle that weighs 5300 lbs. This is the largest vehicle/smallest engine combo I've ever owned so it my performance view may just be skewed and what I'm seeing is normal.

The specs on the diesel over the 3.5l gas are pronounced (I forget the numbers, but torque was somewhere around 100 ft lbs more), and when it comes to accelerating (or towing), torque is everything.
 

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QUOTE (jsinton @ Jun 22 2010, 10:37 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=335418
It's pretty simple. Santa Fe was not designed as a work truck. The transmission and suspension are not built for it. It's ok for towing once and a while, but if you demand heavy duty towing with a diesel motor, then consider a Ford or something.
Yikes, I didn't realize that by "towing" we were talking about a 10,000 pound horse trailer. Indeed, the Santa Fe is no Ford F-350 dualie.

For a 2,000 pound family camper, however, the Santa Fe makes much more sense than a truck. It is more comfortable, more maneuverable, more fuel efficient, and is 100% up to the task. I pulled my camper over 6,000 kilometers in one trip and didn't burn a drop of oil or budge the temperature gauge. Doing the exact same trip with a similar trailer, however, my buddy's F-150 did manage to blow a spark plug nearly clear through the hood. ^_^

QUOTE (pen411 @ Jun 23 2010, 12:00 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=335545
I was thinking more along of the lines of how my 2.7l just feels underpowered for a vehicle that weighs 5300 lbs.
Your Santa Fe must have lead floor mats. My 3.3 AWD weighs a tick over 4,000 pounds. :huh:
 

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Doing the exact same trip with a similar trailer, however, my buddy's F-150 did manage to blow a spark plug nearly clear through the hood.


Don67
Your buddys F-150 would probably have blown the spark plug out even if he was just driving down the road empty. The crimp on the plug that holds the porcilan in probably had a flaw. Or the threads on the plug or in the head were damaged. Depending on where the plug failed.

Just my opinion. :whistling:
 

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QUOTE (dunmovin @ Jun 23 2010, 03:03 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=335598
Doing the exact same trip with a similar trailer, however, my buddy's F-150 did manage to blow a spark plug nearly clear through the hood.


Don67
Your buddys F-150 would probably have blown the spark plug out even if he was just driving down the road empty. The crimp on the plug that holds the porcilan in probably had a flaw. Or the threads on the plug or in the head were damaged. Depending on where the plug failed.

Just my opinion. :whistling:
Sounds like the Ford aluminium head problem. There wasn't enough threads to hold in the spark plug, and they would eventually blow out the plug, ripping out the threads. Some people had the heads replaced multiple times. Only happened on the big block Triton gasoline models for year range '97 to '03.
 

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Dunmovin & jsinton, you're both right. The Triton engine defect affected thousands of truck owners, whether they were towing or not. Just like GMC head gaskets, Dodge Ram transmissions, Nissan Titan axles, and Toyota Tacoma frames.

My point is simply that being a "work truck" does not make a vehicle any tougher or more suitable for moderate towing applications. Buy a cattle hauler if you really need one, but for towing the family camper it's hard to beat a Santa Fe.

Getting back to the original post, I haven't seen any credible evidence that we will get a diesel in North America anytime soon. I'd love a diesel for towing purposes, but probably wouldn't buy one otherwise.
 

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QUOTE (Don67 @ Jun 24 2010, 06:36 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=335753
Dunmovin & jsinton, you're both right. The Triton engine defect affected thousands of truck owners, whether they were towing or not. Just like GMC head gaskets, Dodge Ram transmissions, Nissan Titan axles, and Toyota Tacoma frames.

My point is simply that being a "work truck" does not make a vehicle any tougher or more suitable for moderate towing applications. Buy a cattle hauler if you really need one, but for towing the family camper it's hard to beat a Santa Fe.

Getting back to the original post, I haven't seen any credible evidence that we will get a diesel in North America anytime soon. I'd love a diesel for towing purposes, but probably wouldn't buy one otherwise.
Having driven VW diesel Rabbits, Jettas, and Golfs for years, I'll go for a diesel whenever they market them here in the US. Granted, the fuel is higher per gallon, but the MPG and driveability more than balance it out, IMHO.
 
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