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Discussion Starter #1
There is no spare tire in my Sonata, just a tire sealant & compressor kit.
I know most hybrids, and like 30% of new cars are ditching the spare tire.
But I am a bit old school, spare tire had saved the day for me before.
However, I've not used the sealant before on the roadside.
What is your experience with these kits?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I refuse to use this method for a flat tire. It will throw it out of balance, and the shop replacing your tire may crack you more for the cleanup they will have to do.

In a jam, I would use the sealant. Get to my destination 1st, then deal with the aftermath.
You do have to drive slower, then must clean it out asap.

Couldn't the tire shop clean up all that juice and patch the tire properly?

Would the pressure transmitter be damaged by the liquid?
They are like hundreds of dollar from the dealer.
 

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In a jam, I would use the sealant. Get to my destination 1st, then deal with the aftermath.
You do have to drive slower, then must clean it out asap.

Couldn't the tire shop clean up all that juice and patch the tire properly?

Would the pressure transmitter be damaged by the liquid?
They are like hundreds of dollar from the dealer.
I forgot about the TPMS. Yes, that is also at risk. They could clean it out some and patch it. I know they hate working on tires that have this in there.

Yes, in a jam, but you now have the link to be better prepared. You won’t even need the sealant.
 

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Unless the car comes factory with run-flats, the car should have a spare.
It's ridiculous to just throw a can of sealant in there and think it's OK.

I have not done so for my LF, but all my other cars, I replaced the donut spare with a full sized tire/wheel assembly so I can drive as normal if I get a flat.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
No room for a spare, donut or otherwise, in the hybrid. Thankfully, no run-flats either. Did come with Apple CarPlay though, so no problemo.
No room for a donut is the problem. I heard of people carrying spare/donut in the trunk. I won't. Need the trunk space for Costco runs. :)
Run-flat tires don't work. They are expensive, wear out like 15-20K miles. Poor mpg. Rides bad too.

I am thinking of doing these two things:
1. AAA membership.
2. Good quality tire plug kit. The idea here is to plug the tire then use the compressor to inflate. If that doesn't work, slime it to get out of harm's way.
 

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I did a whole investigation on why Hybrids did not have spare tires. Many other hybrids do not have spares including the larger Ford Fusion. The Ford forum was investigating the same problem. My 2016 did not, the dealer had no idea why not as there is not even a listing for a spare tire. We're retired and travel an awful lot. Did not want the hassle of a 11PM flat and 3 am arrival home. I bought a spare donut that fits the 2016 Sonata, and bought a larger donut tire to match the diameter of my 19" rims I had. Was not sure if the smaller regular donut tire would do anything to the hybrid trans. It fits in back where the battery used to be. It's some 20 lbs and I bought the lug wrench and jack kit. Even the dealer was interested if a tire would fit the wheel as they did not know if the brake calipers were different in Korea. So they ordered a regular donut for me. I put it on at the dealer's lot and even the head mechanic came to check out that the donut would fit and drive on the Hybrid. I found the only reason the hybrid (2016+) does not have a spare is they use that area for the battery.

Most cars no longer have spares, the companies are just cheap. Those goop thing will only handle a slow leak from a nail, no pot-hole flats. See the forum link below on what I found out about my Sonata Hybrid. This goes for most Hyundai cars after 2012, there are no spares. Remember, if you call in a flat. They are not going to bring you a tire !

http://www.hyundai-forums.com/sonat...-lf/537273-sonata-hybrid-2015-2016-spare.html
 

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Discussion Starter #13
... I found the only reason the hybrid (2016+) does not have a spare is they use that area for the battery.
Most cars no longer have spares, the companies are just cheap. Those goop thing will only handle a slow leak from a nail, no pot-hole flats. See the forum link below on what I found out about my Sonata Hybrid. This goes for most Hyundai cars after 2012, there are no spares. Remember, if you call in a flat. They are not going to bring you a tire !
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I read a thread from Prius hybrid group, they are not too happy either.
What was interesting to me - several people tried to use the Toyota "Road-service" to get towed. They were very disappointed. One person said, they would not tow his car unless he bought the tire and service from the dealer. Another said it took 4 hours. A 3rd said, they wouldn't let him park overnight at the dealer even 5 minutes before closing.
I really don't expect to use Hyundai roadside service, unless all options are exhausted.

However, I can kind of, sort of see how the spare got deleted. 1st, I'd guess 50% of today's new car buyers don't know, never had, changed a tire. So, if you don't know how, it matters little if there is a spare tire.
2nd, they say 65% of roadside flats can be patched by the "slime/pump kit" to hobble to a tire shop. So if you combine those stats, then only a small minority will feel totally screwed by the lack of a spare. But they saved a lot of money and space for batteries, and 0.01% more mpg.
 

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I bought a full size tire matching what was on my Sonata PHEV. It stays in my garage. In a pinch, it fits in the rediculously small trunk. Recently my wife came home w/ slow leak caused by a screw. Hyundai would tow me to the nearest dealer for free, or charge me $95 to tow to a *closer* tire shop. I had AAA tow to my tire shop. They fixed it for $20.
In 2 days I return my lemon to Hyundai. Will try to return unused tire to dealer bought from.
Tim


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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I bought a full size tire matching what was on my Sonata PHEV. It stays in my garage. In a pinch, it fits in the rediculously small trunk. Recently my wife came home w/ slow leak caused by a screw. Hyundai would tow me to the nearest dealer for free, or charge me $95 to tow to a *closer* tire shop. I had AAA tow to my tire shop. They fixed it for $20.
In 2 days I return my lemon to Hyundai. Will try to return unused tire to dealer bought from.
Tim


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
Did you start a thread on your Hyundai you're going to turn in?
I'd like to go through the thread just to keep informed on all the problems and the process you went through.
Thanks.
 

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Did you start a thread on your Hyundai you're going to turn in?
I'd like to go through the thread just to keep informed on all the problems and the process you went through.
Thanks.
I had a thread, but had to delete it because it had too many details prohibited by Hyundai, in my final settlement agreement.

My '16 PHEV stopped charging the hybrid battery--taking 9 days the first time and 41 days to fix the 2nd time. Since then, I have had spurious hybrid warnings--taking another total of 10 days, in 4 visits.

The first problem (taking 9 days) started at about 7 months and under 8K miles.
Tim
 

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I had a thread, but had to delete it because it had too many details prohibited by Hyundai, in my final settlement agreement.

My '16 PHEV stopped charging the hybrid battery--taking 9 days the first time and 41 days to fix the 2nd time. Since then, I have had spurious hybrid warnings--taking another total of 10 days, in 4 visits.

The first problem (taking 9 days) started at about 7 months and under 8K miles.
Tim
Thanks for the overview.
Sorry to hear about your issues but problems like yours are one reason I am staying away from hybrids for now.
 

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A hybrid has a smaller battery and is charged up only as you drive, and can only take a person a short, slow distance. A PHEV has a much larger battery that can take the car a further distance at greater speeds on that battery alone and is charged up both by the motor, but most efficiently by plugging it into electricity.

Are you staying away from both hybrids and plug-in hybrids too?

My wife and I were considering the 2018 Accord Hybrid as the lemon replacement. Unfortunately, it is not available for sale yet, and is not anticipated to be on dealer lots no sooner than March 2018. I doubt we can wait that long and may go ahead and get the 1.5L Accord now.

Tim
 

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A hybrid has a smaller battery and is charged up only as you drive, and can only take a person a short, slow distance. A PHEV has a much larger battery that can take the car a further distance at greater speeds on that battery alone and is charged up both by the motor, but most efficiently by plugging it into electricity.

Are you staying away from both hybrids and plug-in hybrids too?

My wife and I were considering the 2018 Accord Hybrid as the lemon replacement. Unfortunately, it is not available for sale yet, and is not anticipated to be on dealer lots no sooner than March 2018. I doubt we can wait that long and may go ahead and get the 1.5L Accord now.

Tim
Over the years I've had coworkers that purchased hybrids as well as having them in the motor pool at work.
I've seen far too many battery related issues so far to want to jump in with one.
One saving grace for the Honda Civic hybrids is that Honda stepped up and replaced all the failing battery packs on Civics if the car had less than 100K miles and then extended out the warranty on the battery packs.
Former coworker decided to keep the car a few more years after that but recently sold the car.
Maybe it was the constant short trips with the standard hybrids, but there were constant battery issues with the hybrids in the motor pool (a mix of Toyota and Honda).
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Good idea Tim. I will check local junk yard, I mean (auto recycler) to see if I can buy a Sonata spare tire for cheap and keep in the garage.
I put together a supplemental kit with stuff found in the garage:
A jack, lug wrench, plug tools, booster battery w/pump.
This way, I can take the wheel off, find the leak and fix it, get to a shop without using the slime.
It fits in the space under the trunk floor.

Sorry to learn of your car problems.
Prius platform is the only hybrid with a proven record. Even they have unhappy owners, but they sold a huuuge number. When we owned a PIP, it wasn't unusual to see 3 or 4 huddled at traffic light.
In 2016-17, to buy a PHEV sedan, choices were limited indeed. For me, Tesla/BMW/MB were over the top. That left the Volt, Fusion and the Sonata-Optima twins.
Good luck.
 
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