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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you guys think about this test?
SF did not really win it. :(
Would a Subaru or SH AWD win it?
 

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its actually a good idea for you guys to perform your own tests and have your own thread on this topic. the v6 might be able to performance difference tasks with the AWD system, due to having more power.
 

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What do you guys think about this test? SF did not really win it. :(
Would a Subaru or SH AWD win it?
Very normal for an open diff. "soft roader" where brake control is used to direct torque from one side to another side. These systems are "tuned" for optimal performance on slippery roads (wet, icy, snowy, muddy, etc). The tuning of the electronics for more hard core off-roading such as your video would be much more aggressive and not as optimal for the typical on-road driving much. Most AWD cars today will behave similarly.

In some newer Subarus, there is an "X-drive" button - when it is engaged, the side-to-side tuning of the torque vectoring is much more aggressive, and it will do significantly better is situations such as the video above.

Kipa
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Very normal for an open diff. "soft roader" where brake control is used to direct torque from one side to another side. These systems are "tuned" for optimal performance on slippery roads (wet, icy, snowy, muddy, etc). The tuning of the electronics for more hard core off-roading such as your video would be much more aggressive and not as optimal for the typical on-road driving much. Most AWD cars today will behave similarly.

In some newer Subarus, there is an "X-drive" button - when it is engaged, the side-to-side tuning of the torque vectoring is much more aggressive, and it will do significantly better is situations such as the video above.

Kipa
Very interesting Kipa. I guess that is what honestly makes more a CUV vs SUV.
 

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I still do not get why the Lock AWD does not help passing the diagonal test.
As I understand it, the AWD lock will just lock 50% of the power to the front axle, and 50% to the back. It does not lock 25% to each wheel, as the distribution between the front wheels, and between the back wheels is via an open diff. The diff allows the power to take the path of least resistant to the wheels, so if one wheel is allowed to spin freely whilst there is sufficient resistance at the other, all of the power will go to the free wheel, and the other wheel will not move. On the diagonal test where two wheels (one from each axle) are lifted to spin freely on a gentle slope the 50/50 power distribution will be sent to those two wheels only and the vehicle will not move.

This is not usually a massive problem. Most two wheel drive cars, for example, work in the same way but would send 100% of it's power to just one wheel if it is allowed to turn freely. You are still getting twice as much traction as a two wheel drive vehicle, but it is going to two wheels and not just one. In practical terms, for daily road use, it is fairy rare that you will get into situations like that on the diagonal test shown, but it can happen, and it does nicely demonstrate a weakness in the system for serious off-road use.

Does that make sense?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
As I understand it, the AWD lock will just lock 50% of the power to the front axle, and 50% to the back. It does not lock 25% to each wheel, as the distribution between the front wheels, and between the back wheels is via an open diff. The diff allows the power to take the path of least resistant to the wheels, so if one wheel is allowed to spin freely whilst there is sufficient resistance at the other, all of the power will go to the free wheel, and the other wheel will not move. On the diagonal test where two wheels (one from each axle) are lifted to spin freely on a gentle slope the 50/50 power distribution will be sent to those two wheels only and the vehicle will not move.

This is not usually a massive problem. Most two wheel drive cars, for example, work in the same way but would send 100% of it's power to just one wheel if it is allowed to turn freely. You are still getting twice as much traction as a two wheel drive vehicle, but it is going to two wheels and not just one. In practical terms, for daily road use, it is fairy rare that you will get into situations like that on the diagonal test shown, but it can happen, and it does nicely demonstrate a weakness in the system for serious off-road use.

Does that make sense?
I see, thanks harveyzone!
 
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