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Discussion Starter #1
The car only has just over 100kms on it, but I have noticed that at a complete stop on a slight incline the car "rolls back" a little when you take the foot off the brake and going to accelerate.

Is this normal for the DCT's?
 

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Yes, it is normal. The Tucson has an anti rollback feature that holds the brake for 2-3 seconds. I would imagine the Elantra has it. I know my 14 does, and it's a full manual.
 

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Ha, trade it for a 1936 Studebaker, first vehicle with a hill holder, step on the brakes, would lock them, step on the clutch would release the brakes. Just saying, nothing new. I cheat, use my left foot to hold the brake pedal when on an incline on rare occasions but you don't do this during a driver's test.

Use to use my left foot a lot since I preferred MT vehicles, but if you want goodies, have to get an AT, so really don't need a left foot anymore.
 

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Pinto, I have the Elantra VE without the DCT. My car has the hillhold. But it's strange. While my Ram and Charger would hold exactly where you took your foot off the brake, my Elantra rolls slightly back before holding. It took a while to get used to. I think this may be what your experiencing and does not have to do with the DCT. The biggest complaint we get with the DCT at my dealership is how it seems to "hesitate" when pulling out from a slow roll. While it's working the way that it should, it is definitely a different feel compared to what people are used to.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Pinto, I have the Elantra VE without the DCT. My car has the hillhold. But it's strange. While my Ram and Charger would hold exactly where you took your foot off the brake, my Elantra rolls slightly back before holding. It took a while to get used to. I think this may be what your experiencing and does not have to do with the DCT. The biggest complaint we get with the DCT at my dealership is how it seems to "hesitate" when pulling out from a slow roll. While it's working the way that it should, it is definitely a different feel compared to what people are used to.
Yes, it is something to get used to. The car has less than 200 kms on it so as time goes on I suppose it will become more "normal". I'm just glad it doesn't have a CVT or I may not have purchased it. I tend to keep cars for 15+ years and the CVT can't be repaired if it goes.

Non-turbo and no CVT were 2 major considerations in this round of car buying.
 

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Non-turbo and no CVT were 2 major considerations in this round of car buying.

? The DCT is with the 1.6T in the Sport. Or did they add the DCT to other models?
 

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As of right now in the Elantra the only DTC is in the automatic Sport. They are in other models, such as the Tucson. But still only the turbo models. It used to be the only way to get good options on the Tucson was to get the 1.6T with the DCT. People didn't like the transmissions so much it was hurting sales big time. Hyundai wised up and now is offering higher level models with the base engine and 6 speed normal automatic.
 

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[/B]Use to use my left foot a lot since I preferred MT vehicles, but if you want goodies, have to get an AT, so really don't need a left foot anymore.
I don't have a car with a clutch any longer, but I think I'll keep my left foot around a little longer if it's all the same to you :laugh: :laugh:
 

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Eco gets one also.

Didn't know the ECO was still in production. But that's also a turbo correct? OP stated non turbo and DCT.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ok, looks like I was a confused??? (ask my wife... normal) The Ltd Ultimate has a regular automatic?? Dammit Jim!! (star trek reference)
 

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Ha, trade it for a 1936 Studebaker, first vehicle with a hill holder, step on the brakes, would lock them, step on the clutch would release the brakes. Just saying, nothing new. I cheat, use my left foot to hold the brake pedal when on an incline on rare occasions but you don't do this during a driver's test.

Use to use my left foot a lot since I preferred MT vehicles, but if you want goodies, have to get an AT, so really don't need a left foot anymore.
Pretty close.... the hill holder engaged when the clutch was fully depressed at the same time as the brakes were applied. It released when the clutch was released (engaged) to get the car moving. For some reason they abandoned the feature in the mid 50's and later.
 

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Ha, 2012 Cruze had a 1.4L with a turbo, far happier with my Limited non-turbo 2.0L, warmup time is much shorter and averaging about 11 mpg more in fuel economy.

For one thing with the Cruze, was only using 1/8" tubing to fed the oil to it, kept mine clean, was a major problem for others. Know nothing about the Hyundai, say something good about it.

Wanted a turbo in my 88 Supra, to my shock, the insurance company I was with for 26 years without a single claim would not cover it, even told them, the reason I purchased it was for better fuel economy, had to find a different insurance company. 55 is still 55!

Ha, was sure not a problem with the Cruze, this was only my second turbo.
 
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