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Good ol' dad wants to get a fancy new Ford, and he's looking to sell his 2013 Sonata Hybrid Limited. He's taken decent care of it (as far as I know, still gonna have it inspected), and it only has ~46k miles. He offered me a pretty good deal on it - $8k after 2k down, and he'll finance me for the rest at $100/mo w/o interest. On top of that, he'll keep the car under his name (if I want) so if the battery bites it, it'll still technically be owned by "the first owner".

I'm pretty set on agreeing, but I thought I'd hit up a forum and ask you guys what you think. If anybody is going to talk me down, it's a dedicated auto forum. Thanks! :cool:
 

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On top of that, he'll keep the car under his name (if I want) so if the battery bites it, it'll still technically be owned by "the first owner".
I'd advise you have the vehicle put in your own name for any number of reasons. State DMVs make it quick and easy and flexible for intra-family transfers using gifting. If Dad is, in fact, selling you the car then the transaction should reflect the reality. Dad can loan you the money to buy the car from him, taking in exchange for the loan a note that obligates you to make specific payments to him over a specific term. That way, the car is yours as of the date of the transaction as is the freedom for you to do with it what you want as well as the obligation to your dad to make timely payments to settle the loan. (It's the same arrangement you two would make if the car was owned by a third party and Dad was helping you out to buy it.)
 

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I'd advise you have the vehicle put in your own name for any number of reasons.)
Wouldn't that make me the second owner? If I transfer the title, even if it's a gift according to the state, I'm still not the original owner, and I would lose the lifetime warranty. If I've read something wrong, lemme know.
 

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Me personally, if I wanted the vehicle, I would either pay cash or finance it through someone else. Keep the peace in the family. I work for a bank and not a day goes by without someone trying to explain why we should make an exception to our credit policy because "its not my fault. I was trying to help a family member."
 

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Wouldn't that make me the second owner? If I transfer the title, even if it's a gift according to the state, I'm still not the original owner, and I would lose the lifetime warranty. If I've read something wrong, lemme know.
What "lifetime warranty"? Factory, emissions, and powertrain warranties go with the vehicle, not the owner. Any "lifetime" warranty provided by a dealer is generally a sales and marketing gimmick as it only kicks in after factory original warranties expire, excludes all "wear," trim, and nav/stereo systems, and often requires that ALL maintenance must've been performed at the dealer. Also, they are typically tied to a specific location, so not very helpful if you move for a job, to attend college, get married, etc.

It's much more important for you to have the vehicle in your own name, free and clear (i.e. not under lien) so your ownership of the vehicle isn't in jeopardy in any way should something happen to your dad or your relationship with him. Also, you do not want to be in the situation where you are dependent on your dad's time and goodwill to deal with all the routine, PITA tasks associated with ownership such as registration, licensing, insurance, traffic ticket notification and resolution, factory recall notices, general repair and maintenance, offers for extended warranties and XM/Sirius or BlueLink renewals, etc., etc., etc. It's your car; you should own it. You get the car; dad gets the dough.
 

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What "lifetime warranty"?
It's pretty well documented that Hyundai offers a lifetime warranty on their Hybrid batteries, but only for the original owner of the new car.

I appreciate where you're coming from, because you're right about nearly everything else. However, according to Hyundai (who I spoke to about this and about the engine recalls last night), if my dad, the original retail owner, transfers the title, the warranty is void. I'm willing to risk me and my dad suddenly getting into a real fight for the first time in 24 years to keep myself safe from having to pay 3-4k to replace a battery down the line.

I really posted this because I wanted people to give me pros or cons of owning a Sonata, my purchasing agreement is fine yo
 

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Sorry, didn't know that about the Hybrid (my daughter leased her 2017 HSH, so warranty coverage was irrelevant). Learned something new, so not a useless day after all.

In that case, I suggest you and your dad become CO-OWNERS of the vehicle. Get it in writing that such an arrangement passes muster with Hyundai. It's not the optimum solution, but it's better than either your dad being the owner of record of your car or you going bare-assed as far as warranty coverage on that pricey battery. Good luck with your "new" car.
 

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Good ol' dad wants to get a fancy new Ford, and he's looking to sell his 2013 Sonata Hybrid Limited. He's taken decent care of it (as far as I know, still gonna have it inspected), and it only has ~46k miles. He offered me a pretty good deal on it - $8k after 2k down, and he'll finance me for the rest at $100/mo w/o interest. On top of that, he'll keep the car under his name (if I want) so if the battery bites it, it'll still technically be owned by "the first owner".

I'm pretty set on agreeing, but I thought I'd hit up a forum and ask you guys what you think. If anybody is going to talk me down, it's a dedicated auto forum. Thanks! :cool:
To be fair, one has to compare hybrid to gas engine equivalent.
Cons:
- More weight, bland handling. Not quick. Drive like grandpa.:grin2:
- Trunk space sacrificed. No spare tire.
- Added complexity. More failure modes.
- Higher purchase price if new.
- May encounter some hybrid hate, especially if driving Prius.
- Some hybrid gas engine start smoothly, almost unnoticeable, others not so much.
Pros:
- Sips gas. Fewer trips to gas station. Kind of cool to be “last in 1st out” at pump. I don’t miss the frequent visits to gas stations at all.
- If all goes well, a big if - less maintenance cost. (Gas engine is not utilized 100%)
- Brake pads last a lot longer due to regen braking.
- Quieter generally and silent at idle.
- Emission is cleaner and defunding the oil economy.
The top 3 reasons to buy hybrid is mpg, mpg, mpg, (Or Km/L if preferred). The financials has to make sense and the key input is future petrol cost which is unknowable. One would need the early adopter’s mindset to own a hybrid. By that I mean, to decide getting great mpg requires accepting a set of tradeoffs and be willing to make driving adjustments because the benefits are compelling enough. Although hybrids are already mainstream in many places. As confirmed by lack of tax rebates, alt energy incentives.
 

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I would agree with most of what FuelSolgood says. Except, the Hybrid is quicker than the standard 2.4. It has more HP and more torque and the torque is pretty much much from the start. It looks like it is a very good deal, regardless of how you title it.

ominousone
 
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