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2019 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.0T HTRAC
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How so? I've used both and they seem fairly evenly matched. And in fact Subaru is the ONLY auto manufacture that solely relies on cameras. Where as everyone else as Hyundai use a camera and radar based system.
Although unlike Subaru when in reverse, Hyundai won't bring you to a full stop before backing into something.
I read that Subie system doesn't work at fast wiper speed. But SF radar doesn't work in snow condition.
I thought SF will brake if backing into obstacle.
 

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I read that Subie system doesn't work at fast wiper speed. But SF radar doesn't work in snow condition.
I thought SF will brake if backing into obstacle.
The Subaru Eyesight still works with wipers running at any speed. A fogged up windshield will disable the system until the windshield is cleared. As I'm sure the same is for Hyundai's camera. Yes any radar based system is susceptible to any kind of obstruction on or in front of the radar sensor.
As for reverse the Subaru system will bring the vehicle to a complete stop. Where as I believe the Hyundai system just cuts power and gives you audible and visual warnings.
 

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2020 2.4 SEL FWD
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How so? I've used both and they seem fairly evenly matched. And in fact Subaru is the ONLY auto manufacture that solely relies on cameras. Where as everyone else as Hyundai use a camera and radar based system.
Although unlike Subaru when in reverse, Hyundai won't bring you to a full stop before backing into something.
There's a lot of documented info available on the Subaru system but with Hyundai, it seems to be more of a "oh yeah, we have that too" scenario. I know several Subaru owners who are absolutely impressed with the capabilities of their EyeSight cars, I don't know anyone who talks much about the capabilities of the Hyundai system.

While I am suitably impressed with my Hyundai LKA and SCC w/ Stop & Go, a salesman demoed the active BSCA for me so I know that works. He also related to me how the RCCW in his personal Palisade automatically stopped for a neighbor dog, and I believe him.

Where it falls way short for me at my current 522 mile mark is the FCA and the pedestrian detection. I think there may be a problem with my particular car. This is near the top of the list of things to be checked out by the dealer.
 

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2020 2.4 SEL FWD
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I've seen more "dog tested, dog friendly" rubbish in recent yrs from them and now I see Hyundai has ads showing how dogs also like Hyundais.
Hey, it may be true. My service dog goes everywhere with me. When we started car shopping he wasn't at all interested in several Kia cars, a Mazda or a VW. But when we went to the first Hyundai dealer to have a look at a Santa Fe, he was up in the drivers seat of that car as soon as the salesman opened the door for him.

He also wanted up in the first Outback we looked at but I saw it coming this time and didn't let him get in.
 

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There's a lot of documented info available on the Subaru system but with Hyundai, it seems to be more of a "oh yeah, we have that too" scenario. I know several Subaru owners who are absolutely impressed with the capabilities of their EyeSight cars, I don't know anyone who talks much about the capabilities of the Hyundai system.

While I am suitably impressed with my Hyundai LKA and SCC w/ Stop & Go, a salesman demoed the active BSCA for me so I know that works. He also related to me how the RCCW in his personal Palisade automatically stopped for a neighbor dog, and I believe him.

Where it falls way short for me at my current 522 mile mark is the FCA and the pedestrian detection. I think there may be a problem with my particular car. This is near the top of the list of things to be checked out by the dealer.
"Allot of documented info available." Meaning Subaru's marketing department is burning the midnight oil vs Hyundai's. As I have experience with both systems as I now own a 2020 Santa Fe and previous a handful of newer Subaru's.
Cross shopping Santa Fe 2020 with Outback 2020
I like how you can customize Hyundai's system where as Subaru is there weather you like it or not. And from experience Hyundai's has less false or aggressive driving alarms. They both are rated the same over on the IIHS website. I will say new for 2020 Subaru's lane centering is more capable than Hyundai's, as in I found Subaru's more autonomous. Subaru said they went with a camera based system because most accidents are minor fender benders and they didn't want the customer to have to pay for replacement of costly radar sensors. And as I have allot of experience with Subaru I suspect it was a cost saving measure for them as well.
But never forget these systems are there to assist the driver not to be fully relied on, hence pedestrian detection.
 

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Hey, it may be true. My service dog goes everywhere with me. When we started car shopping he wasn't at all interested in several Kia cars, a Mazda or a VW. But when we went to the first Hyundai dealer to have a look at a Santa Fe, he was up in the drivers seat of that car as soon as the salesman opened the door for him.

He also wanted up in the first Outback we looked at but I saw it coming this time and didn't let him get in.
I have to give the edge to Subaru by a wide margin over Hyundai when it comes to canine appeal ads (not being a dog lover I'd also have to say they are the most inane) Subaru's ad (link below) shows dogs driving their cars, where I believe Hyundai's do not, plus Subaru claims their cars are "dog tested and dog approved" and I believe Hyundai has yet make that claim.
So remember the driving blindfold incident after the birdbox movie ? I 'm surprised someone hasn't attempted to let their dog actually drive their car and also surprised no one has sued Subaru for making such a stupid ad.

 

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I owned a Subaru once many years ago. It was a turbo something when turbos were new. It was a POS to be honest. Got rid of it early on. Our city of 100k no longer has a Subaru dealer so even if Subaru were the "better" choice I wouldn't buy one as no local service. I am very happy with my 2019 SF Ultimate.
 

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I owned a Subaru once many years ago. It was a turbo something when turbos were new. It was a POS to be honest. Got rid of it early on. Our city of 100k no longer has a Subaru dealer so even if Subaru were the "better" choice I wouldn't buy one as no local service. I am very happy with my 2019 SF Ultimate.
I don't think Subaru began to offer turbocharging until 1990 - turbos were offered by some makers decades before that. Had you owned a Hyundai in the same era as your Subaru more than likely would have had a less than stellar ownership experience.
 

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I don't think Subaru began to offer turbocharging until 1990 - turbos were offered by some makers decades before that. Had you owned a Hyundai in the same era as your Subaru more than likely would have had a less than stellar ownership experience.
I sill laugh when an acquaintance bought a new 1990 Sonata and bragged what a great car it was, we'd occasionally meet in Breckenridge for skiing, leaving out of Colorado Springs, so I see his Sonata one morning making the climb up highway 24, I pass him in my Saab 9000T then see him trying to catch up to me in the Sonata, then I see his car falling behind and pulling to the shoulder with smoke coming from under the hood - he had blown the engine , not a really infrequent occurrence with the early Hyundai products.
 

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I like the 2020 Hyundai Santa Fe very much. Perfect car for us.

I was interested in the comments on the CVT (constant variable transmission). I drove a Prius for 12 years that had a CVT. Comparing the two, the Hyundai Santa FE and Prius, I like the Hyundai DCT 8 speed transmission system much better.
 

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I know it's old-is thread but here are my 2 cents. Test drove OB multiple times and here are things that ultimately were deal breakers for me in OB:
  • lack of storage in centre console / front of cabin [passenger shelf made of slippery plastic - nothing would stay put]
  • 11" display that looked like it was made in the '90 - terrible responsiveness, poor design, terrible graphics.
  • AC controls split between hard buttons and display - and not even on main page but subpage.
  • roof rack makes annoying whistling noise at higher speed and with side wind
  • top trim is only offered with brown interior
Least to say - I bought SF.
 

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I like the 2020 Hyundai Santa Fe very much. Perfect car for us.

I was interested in the comments on the CVT (constant variable transmission). I drove a Prius for 12 years that had a CVT. Comparing the two, the Hyundai Santa FE and Prius, I like the Hyundai DCT 8 speed transmission system much better.
Hyundai 8 speed transmission is not a DCT
 

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2020 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited AWD 2.0
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I had both of these cars as my top two choices. As mentioned the Subaru screen, while looks nice it lacks functionality and ease of use. I also did not care for the eyesight system and how it operated.

I went with a 2020 Limited AWD Turbo and love it. If I could get Blue link activated it woudl be even better!!!
 

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Subie (and Honda, too) has substantially improved their CVT's so that they are no longer as "rubberbandy" as they used to be, but I'm still not a fan of CVT's. Then again, the SF trans is not perfect. Still get an occasional rough shift, and it's too slow to downshift when passing or going uphill.

I think the current state of the art for 8 speed trannies is the ZF derived unit in our Grand Cherokee. Fast shifts like a DCT but never rough. Very similar to the ZF units used in most BMW's, Aston Martins, and a number of other cars. Wish Hyundai tapped ZF for the trans here versus self development.

Like the dashboard design in the new OB (especially the top trim level), but in the end I found the SF's to be less fancy but more functional. Does not look state of the art, but it does the job right with little nonsense.

The new OB is the better handler of the two, although neither is sporty in any sense of the word. I would describe them both as "competent". And the OBXT feels a bit faster than the SF 2.0T, but any difference is not huge.

What really swayed me was the SF's looks, and the fact you get more for your $.


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I had both of these cars as my top two choices. As mentioned the Subaru screen, while looks nice it lacks functionality and ease of use. I also did not care for the eyesight system and how it operated.

I went with a 2020 Limited AWD Turbo and love it. If I could get Blue link activated it woudl be even better!!!
The dealer should of helped you activate it.
 

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I know it's old-is thread but here are my 2 cents. Test drove OB multiple times and here are things that ultimately were deal breakers for me in OB:
  • lack of storage in centre console / front of cabin [passenger shelf made of slippery plastic - nothing would stay put]
  • 11" display that looked like it was made in the '90 - terrible responsiveness, poor design, terrible graphics.
  • AC controls split between hard buttons and display - and not even on main page but subpage.
  • roof rack makes annoying whistling noise at higher speed and with side wind
  • top trim is only offered with brown interior
Least to say - I bought SF.
Yes, going from a 2018 Subaru Outback to the 2020 I was really surprised at the trimmed down and lack of storage area in the new 2020 Outback. Talking to another 2020 Outback owner I think Subaru may of been going for drivers who set it and forget it, get in and just go when they went with the 11.6" touch screen, touch almost everything controls. Where as like myself I like to change settings on the go, fine tune things the way I want them. You know simple things, like not leaving the heated seats on the whole drive, turning off the heated steering wheel when it warms up, not having the EQ settings reset themselves ever couple of days, being able to simply turn off the auto start/stop system. Combine that with no physical buttons and knobs a sluggish screen, doesn't seem very safe to me. And ultimately why I dumped my 2020 Outback for a 2020 SF.
 

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Subie (and Honda, too) has substantially improved their CVT's so that they are no longer as "rubberbandy" as they used to be, but I'm still not a fan of CVT's. Then again, the SF trans is not perfect. Still get an occasional rough shift, and it's too slow to downshift when passing or going uphill.

I think the current state of the art for 8 speed trannies is the ZF derived unit in our Grand Cherokee. Fast shifts like a DCT but never rough. Very similar to the ZF units used in most BMW's, Aston Martins, and a number of other cars. Wish Hyundai tapped ZF for the trans here versus self development.

Like the dashboard design in the new OB (especially the top trim level), but in the end I found the SF's to be less fancy but more functional. Does not look state of the art, but it does the job right with little nonsense.

The new OB is the better handler of the two, although neither is sporty in any sense of the word. I would describe them both as "competent". And the OBXT feels a bit faster than the SF 2.0T, but any difference is not huge.

What really swayed me was the SF's looks, and the fact you get more for your $.


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ZF is constantly having quality problems with there driveline products.
 
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