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Discussion Starter #1
About to use CRC GDI cleaner at about the 10k miles mark, then an oil change.

Easy access for the spray straw was a problem so I drilled a small hole in the intake tube at the bend just before the throttle body. I fashioned a shortened screw and plumbing washer to seal the hole. Using this slight mode means I only have to remove the screw and insert the straw without having to remove any intake parts, and the CRC is sprayed just at the throttle body entrance. The spray can is easily maneuvered into position.

In the pictures you'll see the shiny screw head.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well it's obvious the intake needs to be removed to drill the hole and cut off any burrs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Did you think about using a push in rubber plug instead of the screw and washer?
I considered options from what I had in my various odds and ends boxes. The screw with rubber washer is secure, but a rubber plug would also work. I wanted something that would not extend into the airflow much, so that's why I shortened the screw.
 

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Ive used it 3 times now, most recently was Friday before putting in a new set of spark plugs and and oil and filter change (44,000 miles on car now).

Ive used it 2 different ways with good results and it has been a 10-15 min process , ne CEL, no problems.
1st time I just pulled the air filter and added a 6" extension tube to the straw that is on the can and inserted it into the intake through the air box.
2nd time I pulled the vacuum hose off the intake and sprayed it directly into the intake,
3rd time was last friday I decided I wanted to go through the intake so it also contacted the turbo (on the CRC site they have before and after pictures of turbo blades from a MIni and intake valves from a sonata pre and post treatment and it is significant how much it cleaned up the turbo and the intake valves). So I just loosened the hose clamp on the air cleaner box and pulled the hose back enough to insert the straw and delivered it that way.

All 3 times Ive used it it has been easy, no CEL and the last 2 times small amount of exhaust smoke during the end of treatment and a puff or two when taking it out for the drive after the 1 hr heat soak time.

With the new plugs (old were not very worn and still had correct gap), CRC GDI cleaning, a can of BG 44K in the last tank of gas and oil and filter change the car runs great, smooth at idle just like the day I took delivery, pulls strong and MPG are same as always been 28-31 on my commute depending on driving style.

I think it is a great $10-12 , fifteen minute investment in keeping your GDI intake clean
 

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Ive used it 3 times now, most recently was Friday before putting in a new set of spark plugs and and oil and filter change (44,000 miles on car now).

Ive used it 2 different ways with good results and it has been a 10-15 min process , ne CEL, no problems.
1st time I just pulled the air filter and added a 6" extension tube to the straw that is on the can and inserted it into the intake through the air box.
2nd time I pulled the vacuum hose off the intake and sprayed it directly into the intake,
3rd time was last friday I decided I wanted to go through the intake so it also contacted the turbo (on the CRC site they have before and after pictures of turbo blades from a MIni and intake valves from a sonata pre and post treatment and it is significant how much it cleaned up the turbo and the intake valves). So I just loosened the hose clamp on the air cleaner box and pulled the hose back enough to insert the straw and delivered it that way.

All 3 times Ive used it it has been easy, no CEL and the last 2 times small amount of exhaust smoke during the end of treatment and a puff or two when taking it out for the drive after the 1 hr heat soak time.

With the new plugs (old were not very worn and still had correct gap), CRC GDI cleaning, a can of BG 44K in the last tank of gas and oil and filter change the car runs great, smooth at idle just like the day I took delivery, pulls strong and MPG are same as always been 28-31 on my commute depending on driving style.

I think it is a great $10-12 , fifteen minute investment in keeping your GDI intake clean
*I used the vacuum hose approach - lifted the engine cover off and the tube I used from what I believe is the PVC that runs back into the engine . I had to partially cover the tube hole when I sprayed in the CRC to keep my engine from stalling but it appeared to work ok - I just hope all cylinders get the CRC treatment using a vacuum hose ?
 

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No hole drilling required... lets not make it more complex than it needs to be.

I feed the intake tube, either at the air filter box opening, or any source into the tube.... in order to clean the entire path... TB/intakemanifold/ports/valves...

Some vacuum sources don't feed all cylinders evenly. So, I don't recommend using any spray after the TB, or a vacuum line feeding the manifold after the TB.

I also rotate among the major brands of cleaners. Plenty of IVD/port cleaners available and I'd wager that different chemicals hit different types of deposits better or worse than others.
 

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I feed the intake tube, either at the air filter box opening, or any source into the tube.... in order to clean the entire path... TB/intakemanifold/ports/valves...
I went this approach by spraying it into the intake tube at the hose that goes to the back of the crankcase. Problem is, it got all in the air box, so I ruined a filter in the process.

Next time I’m either going to just spray at the air intake (so it goes downstream and not upstream) or I’ll actually take the **** tube out and spray directly into the throttle body.
 

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Also if I may add some advise. for people using these products Keep in mind, before spraying in any cleaner of sort in this case CRC excellent product by the way. (y) before spraying it in any intake, or throttle body, vacuum hose, (it's critical that the engine be up to operating temperature when doing this procedure) if You don't you run the risk of bending a rod or locking up and engine because you did not warm it up.
 

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Engine should be running prior to spray..... so I just don't see the spray going the wrong way. I just don't get how someone can screw this up.

And, I would definitely use a COLD engine. Why? to avoid PI and detonation since the solvents will sometimes cause knocking. There is no way to bend a rod or locking it up doing this hot or cold.
 

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(it's critical that the engine be up to operating temperature when doing this procedure) if You don't you run the risk of bending a rod or locking up and engine because you did not warm it up.
There is no chance of bending a rod. There are no rods, it is Overhead Cam/Valve engine. There are no rods.

How could the engine be locking up on a not up to Operating temp engine? Pease explain.
 

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There is no chance of bending a rod. There are no rods, it is Overhead Cam/Valve engine. There are no rods.

How could the engine be locking up on a not up to Operating temp engine? Pease explain.
Yes it is possible... there are internal parts that need to be expanded & well lubed with the engine warmed - up & running before shooting in cleaners to avoid trouble. i have even heard of where someone hydrolocked there engine because he dumped in a lot of sefoam into the engine where it could not compress the fluid fast enough and the engine hydrolocked.
 

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We're not using a product that can hydraulic lock an engine. All products sold for the purpose are aerosol cans or aerated fluids. They can't even spray fast enough to hydrolock an engines. All they can do is cause it to stall from being a non-gasoline product. If some idiot dumps an entire can of seafoam fluid down their engine all at once, they get what they deserve. I speak from experience. I don't know someone that knows someones uncles best friends grandsons school teachers boyfriends sidekicks girlfriends sisters biker boyfriend that hydrolock'd an engine with B12 or Seafoam.

The thread title starts with "CRC" which is this aerosol spray product, specifically purposely designed and mostly idiotproof for the DIY capable crowd: CRC Intake Valve Cleaner

I kept my "Berryman" fluid aerator which will work perfectly with "cans" of liquid Seafoam/B12/3m..... and couldn't hydrolock an engine trying.

Engine doesn't need to be warmed up. As long as its 'running', its well lubed. Nothing needs to be expanded for intake/intakeport/intakevalve cleaners to work. You don't have a clue. Quit with your ignorant scare/fear tactics.

Too bad the pictures were lost to greed. 2.4GDI CRC IVD intake valve cleaning

I've done the intake cleaning with aerated liquids, aerosols,..... all on cold engines, a bazillion times. I just make one warning.... don't do it on a diesel. Diesels can use the 'product' as a fuel and go wide [email protected]^&ing open. I've dealt with intake deposits, complements of VW TDI, since the the 1990's and its an engineering snafu. This is no different but is much easier to deal with compared to a TDI. You won't get RPM runaway from a gasoline engine! Diesels require a steam/water based cleaner(like Revive). I mention this since plenty of diesel Hyundai/Kia owners worldwide that might read this thread. Nothing like a tach'd out diesel running on a "spilled" can of Chemtool or Seafoam to pucker the cheeks.

Some of the products that I use regularly on GDI, TBI, and MPFI engines:
and its predecessor Amazon.com: Berryman (2610-6PK) B-12 Chemtool Total Combustion Cleaning Kit - 16 oz., (Pack of 6): Automotive

Intake port/valve piston and CC cleaning is nothing new. We've been doing this since the 1980's to make cars pass emissions tests. Back them, we called it a "de-carbon" or decarboning of the engine. Smarter rotary engine owners have been trying to keep the carbon out since the 1970's.

For the incompetent nincompoops, usually pushing fear scare, various shops offer these type of services:
Have been carboncleaning decarboning before many of you were born using ancient competitor versions of these:

Ordering a Revive for my one of my turbo diesel guinea pigs;

I am pretty sure that CRC cornered the DIY market and why many of the products I linked to earlier are either discontinued or hard to fine. 3m has been in the game long before anyone else.

For most people, with a clue, easiest way is to simply remove air filter & cover and then spray directly into air opening feeding the cold running engine. Others with a bit of more skill can spray directly into the throttle body. I am 3-4 crashed harddrives away from the one with the photos lost to online photo hosting websites that screwed us. I usually just loosen the air filter hose assembly and shoved the spraycannozzle straw into it. There really is no best spray location..... find any that feeds the engine, and the service can be performed on ANY carb'd, TBI, MPFI, or GDI gasoline engine. 30 years ago, that CRC spray could've saved a bazillion 12a and 13b wankels. Extremists rotary owners created the Seafoam pour soak and smoke show!

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There are no rods, it is Overhead Cam/Valve engine.
He's talking about connecting rods, not push rods.
How could the engine be locking up on a not up to Operating temp engine?
If whatever you spray into the intake doesn't get hot enough to boil/vaporize it may reach the
combustion chamber in liquid form.
Collect enough liquid into the combustion chamber and you get hydrolock.

Rather than send cleaner and dissolved gunk to the cat converter,
when the time comes I'll take off the intake manifold and clean the valves.
 

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I’m not doing it either, I’m at 75000km with no issues and if issues do arise I’ll go the route of a thorough cleaning. Also, from what I’ve read, if the engine isn’t up to operating temperature the cleaning can pool up in the intake manifold and under hard acceleration can create a big gulp of cleaner into the cylinders and create a hydrolock situation. Whether it’s true or not I’m not taking any chances.
 

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He's talking about connecting rods, not push rods.

If whatever you spray into the intake doesn't get hot enough to boil/vaporize it may reach the
combustion chamber in liquid form.
Collect enough liquid into the combustion chamber and you get hydrolock.

Rather than send cleaner and dissolved gunk to the cat converter,
when the time comes I'll take off the intake manifold and clean the valves.
Thank you.
 

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Name calling (by deadrx7conv) is the sign of an insecure mind
Agree.
It's also a sign of a inferior brain. One may know lots about spraying liquids into vehicles and know very little about anything else..... like how to treat / talk to members here properly.

All the mention of all these varying spray cleaners (and how / where to use them), was helpful.
 
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