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I have a 2012 SE 2.0T. So I flushed my coolant system with what info I found online. Drained out the old coolant from tank and radiator. Flushed 3 times with distilled water. After each fill of distilled water I started the car and let it get to operational temperature, then let it cool, remove water and refill with water. Did that 3 times.

The problem I had was that the cooling fan didn't turn on the whole time I had it at operational temperature. How do you get the fan to run? Is it okay that I did the flush without the cooling fan turning on?

So after draining out the water I filled it up with some PEAK 50/50 global lifetime coolant. Since I'm pretty sure the system still had some water left in it I'm going to top it off with some full strength the next few days.

Did I flush and refill my coolant correctly?
 

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To answer your question about how to get the fan on, you could set the AC to max and that would force it on. Since the fan is electric and not connected to any pump or anything else mechanical, you should be fine.
 

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To answer your question about how to get the fan on, you could set the AC to max and that would force it on. Since the fan is electric and not connected to any pump or anything else mechanical, you should be fine.
Okay so the fan doesn't run a pump for the coolant system? I seen this manual for a flush that said to have the cooling fan run a few times before shutting the car off but it was for a 2.4, I couldn't find one for the 2.0
 

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The fan is an electrical fan so it does nothing in terms of your flush. The reason they want you get the fan to kick on is to make sure that coolant gets hot enough for your thermostat to open so that you're flushing the entire system and not just the radiator. Fan turns on right around 210 deg F. Thermostat opens around 170 so having the fan cycle on at least once helps ensure that you're circulating water through the whole system.

If you have a scantool that reads your coolant and engine temp, you can just go by the sensor numbers.
 

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You don't have to flush, just do drain and fill and the additives can take care of. Remove thermostat bolts when draining so you can drain out coolant from thermostat and engine. Turn the heat on for about 5 min to flush the heater core. I prefer using full strength to get 60%-70% concentrate so it last longer
 

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Asian coolants do not need to be flushed.

Cooling fan has nothing to do with coolant flushing.

You did NOT refill correctly. You'll never get out all of the flushing water. You should have filled up with full strength until you reached the 1/2 capacity point. Coolant capacity is in your owners manual.
Adding 50:50 when the engine block is full of water is the biggest mistake that DIY'ers do.

For example, say I made the mistake of the drain/refill 3x or more with water. Since my capacity is ~7 quarts, I would refill with 3.5 quarts of full strength antfreeze and then the remainder with water. I would fill the overflow bottle with 50:50.

I would only use distilled, RO, or DI water when flushing or mixing ratios.

Since the OP's location sports winters, I would test the coolant for freeze protection and compare to a ratio chart. This will help you determine how much needs to be drained in order to add enough 100% to get close to 50:50.

In the future, drain/refill the radiator and overflow bottle and then refill with 50:50. Don't do any flush water repeat shenanigans.

Peak Global Lifetime is good stuff and is sold in 50:50 and 100% bottles.
https://peakauto.com/products/antifreeze-and-cool/auto/global-lifetime-full-strength/
https://peakauto.com/products/antifreeze-and-cool/auto/globallifetime-5050/

Without water, EG alone doesn't absorb/reject heat quick enough. So, you do NOT want a 60-70% EG concentration, especially during the summer or in southern hotter states.

For northern climates(Canada/Alaska), some of the Asian automakers blend 55% EG and 45% water as their premix. I am in the southern climate and tend to go opposite for improved BTU control.... 45% EG and 55% water.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the info, I seen Hyundai manuals say flush so I did a flush. Right now I’m trying to find some straight coolant but having a problem finding it locally. I have a tester and I planed to make sure I’m running at minimum 50/50 before winter hits
 

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What you did is a repeat dilution. Flush isn't defined by the automaker. Unlike a toilet, the engine doesn't have a handle to dump all the coolant.

NAPA, the store most forget about, stocks Peak Global full strength.
 

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Asian coolants do not need to be flushed.

Cooling fan has nothing to do with coolant flushing.

You did NOT refill correctly. You'll never get out all of the flushing water. You should have filled up with full strength until you reached the 1/2 capacity point. Coolant capacity is in your owners manual.
Adding 50:50 when the engine block is full of water is the biggest mistake that DIY'ers do.

For example, say I made the mistake of the drain/refill 3x or more with water. Since my capacity is ~7 quarts, I would refill with 3.5 quarts of full strength antfreeze and then the remainder with water. I would fill the overflow bottle with 50:50.

I would only use distilled, RO, or DI water when flushing or mixing ratios.

Since the OP's location sports winters, I would test the coolant for freeze protection and compare to a ratio chart. This will help you determine how much needs to be drained in order to add enough 100% to get close to 50:50.

In the future, drain/refill the radiator and overflow bottle and then refill with 50:50. Don't do any flush water repeat shenanigans.

Peak Global Lifetime is good stuff and is sold in 50:50 and 100% bottles.
https://peakauto.com/products/antifreeze-and-cool/auto/global-lifetime-full-strength/
https://peakauto.com/products/antifreeze-and-cool/auto/globallifetime-5050/

Without water, EG alone doesn't absorb/reject heat quick enough. So, you do NOT want a 60-70% EG concentration, especially during the summer or in southern hotter states.

For northern climates(Canada/Alaska), some of the Asian automakers blend 55% EG and 45% water as their premix. I am in the southern climate and tend to go opposite for improved BTU control.... 45% EG and 55% water.

I recently did my coolant flush (drain/fill) of my original coolant at ~6years and 70K miles. I used only distilled water four times, running the car with the heater on (to get that loop also flushed) up to temperature each time. On the last distilled drain, I filled with Zerex Asian formula (50:50) and repeated the drain fill with another refill of coolant once more. Yes, I used more coolant that way but I got the ratio of new coolant much closer to 50:50 that way. Coolant is pretty cheap at $16 jug (not on sale). I flushed out the coolant reservoir tank and filled with fresh coolant as well. IF I could have found Zerex Asian formula in a full strength jug (which they don't do) I would have done that and saved maybe a bit of money and one drain/fill cycle. No Biggie and I got the coolant in I really wanted to use.
 

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I have not seen a car with a valve in the heater core line that required turning on the heat. All turning on the heater fan and turning up the temp to hot does is make it take longer for the coolant to heat up. The heater core gets full flow all the time, cold or hot.
 

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I have not seen a car with a valve in the heater core line that required turning on the heat. All turning on the heater fan and turning up the temp to hot does is make it take longer for the coolant to heat up. The heater core gets full flow all the time, cold or hot.
You have not seen it, so it doesn't exist?


Clearly, I am not going to convince you, and you are not going to do any research on it. For anyone else, yes there are cars that use electric coolant valves to control the air temperature coming out by modulating the amount of coolant flow through the heater core(s). My BMW even had some PCM control over the engine thermostat. It could vary engine coolant temperature through about a 20 degree range. It even had protection such that it would shut off heater coolant flow if the engine coolant temperature got too high, to prevent damage to the heater core (not a good thing for the engine). They protected the heater core at the cost of the head gaskets.



My LSes also actually have electric pumps for the heater coolant circuit, in addition to the dual coolant solenoid valves. Why don't you look up that car and tell my how the heat in the cabin could be controlled without those valves, since there are not temperature blend doors in that car? How come the fill and bleed procedure requires that the heat be set to maximum? Should I post it? Should I post replacement heater valve ads?



Why is it so hard for some people to believe that there are different things out there than they themselves have ever experienced? I ask, how many BMWs have you owned or worked on? How many Jaguars? How many recent Lincolns? If I never had or worked on those cars, then I might believe you. Being an engineer, I am very curious about how things work, so I look into this stuff. How are you such an expert on this subject if you have never had or worked on these brands?
 

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German engineering is the worst for lack of simplicity. Ford found out the hard way that you should have full time flow through the heater core with their trusty Vulcan V6 that the modified to have just bypass flow through the heater core. It slugged up the whole cooling system.


Are any valve controlled heater core circuits, it is unneeded and will cause problems down the road. And whatever auto manufacture that doesn't design the heater core to take full engine temps is really cutting corners, plastic heater core parts?
 

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German engineering is the worst for lack of simplicity. Ford found out the hard way that you should have full time flow through the heater core with their trusty Vulcan V6 that the modified to have just bypass flow through the heater core. It slugged up the whole cooling system.


Are any valve controlled heater core circuits, it is unneeded and will cause problems down the road. And whatever auto manufacture that doesn't design the heater core to take full engine temps is really cutting corners, plastic heater core parts?

I don't really disagree or dispute those things. Still, that does not change the fact that cars are made today that do use heater coolant flow control valves, and it's definitely not just the German cars. On those cars, you do have to follow the factory fill and bleed procedure.


BTW, both of my LSes are at 200K+ miles, and there's no sludge in the cooling systems. They work really well (heater and engine cooling), but they are picky about coolant, parts, and filling/bleeding. The electronics are intelligent enough to open the valves a little sometimes in the summer time. If it's too hot to do it while you are in the car, it will wait till you get out and then run the electric coolant pump a little while to circulate it.
 

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Asian coolants do not need to be flushed.

Cooling fan has nothing to do with coolant flushing.

You did NOT refill correctly. You'll never get out all of the flushing water. You should have filled up with full strength until you reached the 1/2 capacity point. Coolant capacity is in your owners manual.
Adding 50:50 when the engine block is full of water is the biggest mistake that DIY'ers do.

For example, say I made the mistake of the drain/refill 3x or more with water. Since my capacity is ~7 quarts, I would refill with 3.5 quarts of full strength antfreeze and then the remainder with water. I would fill the overflow bottle with 50:50.

I would only use distilled, RO, or DI water when flushing or mixing ratios.

Since the OP's location sports winters, I would test the coolant for freeze protection and compare to a ratio chart. This will help you determine how much needs to be drained in order to add enough 100% to get close to 50:50.

In the future, drain/refill the radiator and overflow bottle and then refill with 50:50. Don't do any flush water repeat shenanigans.
Old topic I'm aware and not the LF forum but only one I could find. I have an LF 2016 Sonata Sport 2.4L GDI. I am getting close to 60k miles which is when you're supposed to change the coolant for the first time according to owners manual. I have had the car since new so it has been well maintained.

In regards to your post above, are you saying flushing is unnecessary and simply opening the petcock, draining the radiator, draining the reservoir tank, adding 50:50 premix to the radiator and then to reservoir tank until full is sufficient? If so, how do you drain the reservoir? I know where the petcock is for the radiator so that should be pretty simple.

Additionally, any thoughts on the "first change at 60k, then 30k thereafter verbiage"? To me changing it again every 30k (which is 2 years of driving for me) seems excessive. Appreciate everyone's thoughts.
 

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Old topic I'm aware and not the LF forum but only one I could find. I have an LF 2016 Sonata Sport 2.4L GDI. I am getting close to 60k miles which is when you're supposed to change the coolant for the first time according to owners manual. I have had the car since new so it has been well maintained.

In regards to your post above, are you saying flushing is unnecessary and simply opening the petcock, draining the radiator, draining the reservoir tank, adding 50:50 premix to the radiator and then to reservoir tank until full is sufficient? If so, how do you drain the reservoir? I know where the petcock is for the radiator so that should be pretty simple.

Additionally, any thoughts on the "first change at 60k, then 30k thereafter verbiage"? To me changing it again every 30k (which is 2 years of driving for me) seems excessive. Appreciate everyone's thoughts.
I suck out the reservoir with a hand pump. I'm not aware of a way to "drain" the fluid in the overflow reservoir.
 

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simply opening the petcock, draining the radiator, draining the reservoir tank, adding 50:50 premix to the radiator and then to reservoir tank until full is sufficient?
That's how I've done it with previous cars, but I do the first change early.
The old coolant always comes out clear. Any corrosion would make it cloudy.
I plan to do it on the Tucson at 5 years. Then every 5 years with Zerex Asian.
 

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That's how I've done it with previous cars, but I do the first change early.
The old coolant always comes out clear. Any corrosion would make it cloudy.
I plan to do it on the Tucson at 5 years. Then every 5 years with Zerex Asian.
Running the car with heater on and burping of lines still necessary for drain/refill? Or just check the reservoir tank for the next few days and add as needed? Assuming the radiator would pull from the reservoir tank as needed.
 
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