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Complete Amp, Speaker, and Wire Install​

Notes:
Hopefully this saves someone some time, because it took me around ~20 hours from start to finish to remove trim, install amp, install speakers, run speaker wire, and reinstall the trim (not a single broken latch by the way).

NOT ALL OF THE PICTURES ARE MY OWN. I do not claim to have taken all these photos, but they greatly helped me when I installed everything. Hopefully the owners do not mind that I post them.

Links:
Here are some important links that helped me immensely:
Component Speaker Install by SilverGLS
Amp Install by FlatLand2D
Crutchfield - Amp Install
A huge thank you goes out to everyone on this forum that helped me with my questions and especially SilverGLS and FlatLand2D for their guides.

Info:
I have a 2012 Elantra. I installed Infinity Kappa 60.9 component systems in the front and Infinity Kappa 652.9i in the rear and a Pioneer GM-D9500 amp. I chose the amp because of it's tiny size and Class FD cooling and energy efficiency because I was planning on installing it under my seat. They we're all bought from various sellers on Amazon. I bought my 8 gauge amp install kit from KnuKonceptz because it had good reviews and was cheap for everything it included. It all sounds amazing. The most impressive feature is the volume. The same volume that happened on 25 on the stock system now occurs at about 11 or 12. I haven't put it past 14... yet.

Before we begin, realize that these are process photos and you should finish your wire with electrical tape, solder, loom, velcro, zip-ties, etc. so that everything is protected, covered, and not dangerous.

Instructions:​

0. Roll the rear windows all the way down and the front windows about halfway down (it'll help later). Also, lower the volume on your head unit all the way down so that when you turn it back on it won't blast music.

1. VERY IMPORTANT: Pop the hood and disconnect the negative battery terminal on your car battery.

2. Start removing trim. With all of this, wrap a screwdriver in tape, cloth, etc. so that you don't scratch your interior. The plastic kickplates on the bottom of each side doorway pop off with sufficient pressure and a screwdriver (as does all of the trim, so don't worry about breaking them. It's OK to be forceful). You will have to remove the trim that hides the seat-belts, so you might as well do that right now as well. Again, just put a screwdriver in and wedge it open. The doors are removed by popping off 2 little trap doors, removing 2 screws, pulling the trim off, and then disconnecting all the wires and handle/door openers. Watch a video here:
. Once the door panels are off, you may want to remove the speakers now. There are many different ways of doing this, but I decided on the tried and true method courtesy of SilverGLS (his picture below). Cut the speaker with an Xacto right where the high-tech material *ahem* I mean paper, meets the rubber. He removed his speaker buckets, but mine were riveted (except for one which used T20 Torx for some reason...) so I decided to just cut them while still installed in the door so I could reuse the buckets as spacers.
The head unit trim is a little more complicated. Follow this link for a video of the removal process:
. Or, look at these pictures:


3. Run the amp power cable through your firewall. I used an existing hole suggested by FlatLand2D (these are his photos). The cable will share a grommet with the hood release cable. I used a length of bailing wire attached to the cable to fish the wire through the firewall, to a spot I could reach near the battery. You are going to do this a lot throughout the guide, so I put some yellow tape on the last 6 inches of the bailing wire so that I could spot it easier.

These photos were taken from where the driver's feet would normally be, by FlatLand2D.

4. Attach the power cable with a ring terminal to the positive side of the battery and install the in-line fuse holder. Do not install the fuse yet, as you will probably turn the car on/off a few times throughout the install. Another photo from FlatLand2D showing the best positioning:


5. Time to run some speaker wire. With all of these, keep some slack wherever they will meet the amp, so that you can always pull some through to the speakers if you need more. If you don't need the slack you can always cut them later. I decided on 12 gauge because I had a ton of it laying around the house. It is much thicker than the stock wire, but I don't know if it makes a difference in sound quality. All I can say is that it sounds excellent and I have peace of mind knowing that the cable can supply all the necessary power. Here's a diagram I made showing how I ran each wire:
You want the power wire to not run parallel with any of the other wires essentially. My amp is underneath the driver seat. Power cable goes through the firewall. Ground wire connects to the driver seat frame (scrape off any paint so that it gets a metal to metal connection). The Front Left speaker wire and the RCA/Line Level Input/Remote Turn On are on the driver side of the center console, tucked up into the console plastic and carpeting. They split from each other above the gas pedal, zip tied to some other wires behind the dash. The Rear Right and Front Right go under the carpet from the driver seat, to the center console, to the passenger seat, and split at the seatbelt column trim. Instead of going around the center console, which is difficult because the carpet is so tight, I ran it right through/under. If you open the console and lift off the small piece of carpet in the console, you will see some empty space inside along with the parking brake cable. I drilled two small holes in this piece of plastic on the bottom of the console so that I could zip tie the speaker wire above the parking brake cable (you don't want them touching obviously). For all of this, you want to use the bailing wire trick. It's pretty much impossible without it. If you have to cut a small hole in the carpet to guide your wires, go ahead. It's impossible to see a slit in the carpet once you just push it back together. The trouble arrives when you have to get the speaker wire into the doors...

6. Let's start with the rear doors because they are easier. If you open the door you will see a rubber coil and two grommets housing all of the wires. Pull the top rubber grommet off to access the terminal housing.
The terminal itself has a male and female connector, which can be disconnected with a screwdriver from outside the car by pushing in the clasps on the sides. If you open the front door, close the rear, and you can access everything easier. Once disconnected form the door, you want to remove the one still attached to the car frame. Again, use a screwdriver to push in the clasps on the top and bottom and it will then push into the interior. Run the speaker wire up the seatbelt column, and into the hole that this terminal blocked. On the exterior, use bailing wire to again pull the speaker wire down the rubber coil. This can be tricky because there isn't a lot of room, but it will work. Just be careful not to poke through the rubber. Reach into the empty speaker hole and pull your wire through. Just make sure to secure the speaker wire to the bottom interior (I used zip-ties) of the car door, because the window can rip out the speaker wire (more likely in the front doors). Now, reconnect the terminal housing. You probably won't be able to connect the housing back into it's slot on the column due to the speaker wire (I got 1 of 2), but as long as you clip the top of the housing back into it's slot, it'll stay secured. Clip the housing back together, and put the rubber grommet back in.

7. Time for the front doors. These ones have a similar type of terminal housing, except it's not a good idea or easy to disconnect them, unfortunately. Luckily there is a small EMPTY rubber grommet right below the rubber coil! On the interior, this hole is covered with a small, thin sheet of foam padding. Poke through with bailing wire and fish it through the grommet. It might not be the best idea, but I did this next part anyway. Cut a small slit in the rubber coil where it meets the wire. I later went through with some silicone to waterproof the coil, but it probably doesn't need it. Push your speaker wire through the coil, and into the door. If the front door windows are all the way down, you will notice that you don't have much room to reach inside, which is why I suggested only putting them down halfway, so you can make sure your speaker wont hit the glass, and have some wiggle room for running wire. Again, make sure that the wire is all the way down at the bottom of the door because if it's too tight at the top, the window can rip it out when it rolls down. Believe me, I did it. It sucked.
Interior through foam, taken on the passenger side feet level:
Exterior through the grommet and coil:

8. Go ahead and install the Rear speakers to have some install relief. I used a drill to make a small guide hole into the buckets, and then just used the supplied screws to go right into the stock spacers.

9. Now let's start on the Front door speakers. These are a little trickier because they are components, which have a tweeter and a crossover. I started with the crossover because I wanted it to mount to the door, not the door trim/panel, while the tweeters are mounted to the trim. The Infinity crossover is quite large and the place that made the most sense to me is the area on the door where the interior pocket ends. You may have to trim some of the foam off of the door panel. It's hard to explain, but it's right here:
The great thing about this location is that there is an unused rubber grommet right above it so you can have the Line In and Woofer speaker wires feed behind the plastic, while the Tweeter wire can clip into the existing brackets.
Remove the stock tweeter by means of the two screws and a wire harness. As you can see, the Infinity tweeters are much larger and don't fit in the same slot. I used a Dremel to grind down some nearby pressure points.

Again, I used a method by SilverGLS to attach the tweeters using plumbing strap. Don't be stupid like me, attach the speaker wire before the plumbing strap...


10. Time for the Head Unit Hack n Slash. With the head unit removed and all your cables run to the back, follow this diagram to find the necessary cables to splice:


A1-A4 are the Positives
A10-A13 are the Negatives
B11 is the Turn On Lead
Peel back the felt wrap about 4 inches to give yourself plenty of space. Cut one wire at a time as far from the terminal housing as you can (about 4 inches for me). Splice these wires to your Speaker Wires and Line Level Inputs accordingly. Take your time to make sure you connect the right wires. When you're done, don't be ashamed if it looks like crap like mine:

11. Connect your head unit when you are positive it's all connected securely.

12. Connect your speakers if you haven't already.

13. Connect all the cords to your amp. Trim long wires if necessary for a clean look. Mine was straight forward and just required some lugs and ring terminals and a good crimp (I used pliers).

14. Insert the fuse into the fuse holder first, and then attach the negative terminal to the battery.

15. Pray that it works when you power on your car. Start with a very low volume, because it will be quite a bit louder than normal. If one speaker doesn't work, check your connections. Roll each window up and down, one at a time to make sure none of the speakers go out (my Front Left did because I made the speaker wire way too tight).

16. If everything works, go ahead and reattach the trim while you listen to this song at blaring levels to get you pumped:

16. Adjust your gains, as per this site: Crutchfield - Tune your Car Stereo

That's it! Enjoy your stereo! Take a nice long drive and wakeup your neighbors since it's probably 3 a.m. when you finish.
 
A

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Beautiful, thank you for the guide and time spent doing it and the install

I hope you are enjoying it, I plan on doing speaker upgrades this summer/fall

Pretty sure this should get stickied
 

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Great post. I need to make a sticky for all of the car audio threads soon. Marked for later.

Sent from my SPH-D710 using AutoGuide.Com Free App
 

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It all looks really good. How about a pic of the amp tucked away under the seat? My Alpine MRP-F300 isn't going to quite fit without some modification to the air vents or maybe I'll just let it sit uneven.
 

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I am a bit disappointed in the sound quality on my new Elantra, and am thinking of doing this kind of upgrade.

If anyone does this in the future, I would like to see:
  • pics of the OEM equipment as it is uncovered by removal of panels, etc.
  • pics of the new equipment before it is installed - not clear from the posted pics which pieces are new and which are OEM
  • extreme close up of the 2 terminal blocks from the OEM head unit and a description of the color-coding on the OEM wires. The posted pics and diagrams of the terminal blocks are made even more confusing by the switching of positions and rotation of the diagram of the terminal blocks.
I've installed a few audio upgrades in vehicles over the years. Now & then I get a new device that turns out to be "dead on arrival" and will not power up even when properly installed. I prefer to verify my new equipment works before I install it. No "plug and pray" for me. I create a mocked up installation using the wire nuts, wiring, an external 12 VDC battery, the amp & the new speakers to verify their proper operation.
 

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Magnificently written. Written in plain, understandable English. Pictoral references make the install appear not so daunting. Truly a nice installation as well as a nicely composed instructional reference. And the surgeon-like white gloves on the inside? We need to start calling you Dr. Tunes!

If owner's manuals were developed in this manner, maybe more people would read them. :thumbsup:
 

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All the diagrams and instructions for trim removal can be found on www.hmaservice.com. You have to sign up but it's free.

You can probably fill in the blanks by comparing pictures from all the install threads that have been done so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thanks for all the responses guys, I think that with all the snags worked out in this guide, it should go much more smoothly for anyone else attempting this. The worst part is the re-wiring because it is difficult to fish everything through the carpet and door grommets.

It all looks really good. How about a pic of the amp tucked away under the seat? My Alpine MRP-F300 isn't going to quite fit without some modification to the air vents or maybe I'll just let it sit uneven.
Sure thing, it's still messy as I haven't tucked everything into place since I'm still adjusting gains and low/high filters. I'll snap one tomorrow along with a couple shots that would help the guide.

I am a bit disappointed in the sound quality on my new Elantra, and am thinking of doing this kind of upgrade.

If anyone does this in the future, I would like to see:
  • pics of the OEM equipment as it is uncovered by removal of panels, etc.
  • pics of the new equipment before it is installed - not clear from the posted pics which pieces are new and which are OEM
  • extreme close up of the 2 terminal blocks from the OEM head unit and a description of the color-coding on the OEM wires. The posted pics and diagrams of the terminal blocks are made even more confusing by the switching of positions and rotation of the diagram of the terminal blocks.
I've installed a few audio upgrades in vehicles over the years. Now & then I get a new device that turns out to be "dead on arrival" and will not power up even when properly installed. I prefer to verify my new equipment works before I install it. No "plug and pray" for me. I create a mocked up installation using the wire nuts, wiring, an external 12 VDC battery, the amp & the new speakers to verify their proper operation.
I can without a doubt say that the sound quality is vastly superior now. It's like night and day.
For your first two points, I would head to the links mentioned at the beginning of the guide because SilverGLS and FlatLand2D have some great guides as well with much more detailed pictures (I didn't want to steal all their work). The head unit diagram is confusing, I agree. I got it from a Hyundai tech website, so there's not a lot I can do about that, but I agree that it should list colors. Once you get in there and follow the numbered locations on the diagram though, the colors really don't matter. I even remember seeing that there were 2 orange wires right next to each other, so it might make it more difficult if you just go by colors. Here's the website so that you can look up other info like trim removal, etc: https://www.hyundaitechinfo.com/
I'll go ahead and add that to the guide as well.

That's a good idea about testing the equipment. I meant more to hope that all your wiring was correct, but having a dead speaker would really suck too.

EDIT: I see that I can edit this "reply" but there's no button to edit the original post. Any reason why? Can I not add things to the first post?
 

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EDIT: I see that I can edit this "reply" but there's no button to edit the original post. Any reason why? Can I not add things to the first post?
I suspect that after someone adds a reply, the previous poster's ability to edit his post is canceled. I wanted to edit my previous post, found someone had added a reply & found I couldn't do what I wanted to.
 

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any photo's of your finished product?? Id love to see the doors.

Also Im a little confused about how you connected the woofers?? did I miss the part about how you screw them on over the existing ring? I did not get that part.

I have a Santa Fe but am interested because my stock Infinity woofer speakers are connected by rivets like yours, was not sure how to get them out? and how to get a new speaker in?
 

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I even remember seeing that there were 2 orange wires right next to each other, so it might make it more difficult if you just go by colors. Here's the website so that you can look up other info like trim removal, etc: https://www.hyundaitechinfo.com/
I'll go ahead and add that to the guide as well.

That's a good idea about testing the equipment. I meant more to hope that all your wiring was correct, but having a dead speaker would really suck too.
Testing the equipment was something I learned from my brother who spent a couple of days installing an audio system only to find it was dead on arrival. So he spent a couple more days UN-installing it to return it for credit. Pre-testing depends on how lucky you feel.
Sometimes manufacturers aren't consistent in how they color-code their wires & so don't include it in their descriptions. I went to the website you mentioned, but have not been able to find the original image you posted of the head unit and its connections. I found a lot of other very useful material, but not those. The illustrations you posted show a partial URL for the image, but not enough for me to find it again.
 

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my stock Infinity woofer speakers are connected by rivets like yours, was not sure how to get them out?
Rivet removal procedures vary with the type. I don't know what kind of rivet Hyundai uses on their speakers. Some plastic rivets can be beheaded with an end cutter or even the tip of a sharp knife. If the rivets are like POP® rivets, you can drill right down the center of the rivet, 1/8" drill is usually just right. This removes most of the center body of the rivet & what's left tends to fall out, if not you use needle nose pliers to extract the remains. I have used a small grinding wheel on a rotary tool like a Dremel® or similar, or even a huge angle grinder (really, really fast), to behead a rivet & remove it.
Many, many years ago I installed 6" speakers in auto sheet metal designed to hold 5-1/4" speakers, using only a hack saw & a file. Took terribly long. As I gained in sense & experience I came to own both a rotary tool & an angle grinder.
 

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Rivet removal procedures vary with the type.
don't want to hijack this thread, so you can PM me if you would like...are these rivets replacable? or would I need a screw to replace it?

reason being is I plan on adding dynamat to my doors and to get behind the speaker I need to remove it from the rivets...but how would I get the speaker back in place? screws? (eventually I plan on replacing the speakers, which is why this thread interests me...gives a good idea of what to expect)
 

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don't want to hijack this thread, so you can PM me if you would like...are these rivets replacable? or would I need a screw to replace it?

reason being is I plan on adding dynamat to my doors and to get behind the speaker I need to remove it from the rivets...but how would I get the speaker back in place? screws? (eventually I plan on replacing the speakers, which is why this thread interests me...gives a good idea of what to expect)
I don't think this is hijacking the thread at all, your question is quite relevant. I myself hate having my car partly in pieces & then discover I need to drive around to buy a special tool or unusual fastener to complete a job. Since I haven't taken a personal look at my Elantra's speakers, I can't well answer your question. Others posting on this topic here & elsewhere have said there is a mix of screws and rivets holding the speakers to the body. Usually you can substitute a sheet metal screw for a rivet unless there is some mechanical problem that prevents you from installing the screw. For example, the rivet's hole could be through several layers of sheet metal, too thick for common sheet metal screws to be installed in. (I have different sizes of sheet metal screws around the garage, but hardly ever have the exact size I want) A "tapered punch" can be used to form a rivet hole so that a sheet metal screw's threads can be started easily. Some times you can use a regular nut & bolt to substitute for a destroyed rivet. Or you can install a POP® rivet. Those rivets and their installing tools are available & should be a basic part of your tool kit anyway. For really awkward situations, I have used my cheap HarborFreight tap & die set to create threads in metal work, and installed a regular machine bolt to replace a rivet.
This is where knowing the sizes of the rivets & holes ahead of time would be helpful.
 

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Thanks!
All these new infos will be very helpful and greatly appreciated:thumbsup:
 

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Great post....very details pics, will definately help a lot of people. i too have my amp mounted under the front seat and ran all my wires similarly. Would have loved to see that chart before i installed and ran wires. Would have saved me a lot of time. I think this post will help people with the how to do as apposed to my post which was more of what I mostly had done...lol.

Enjoy
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I would have liked to just add these to the guide, but I guess I can't edit it as Artfd pointed out.

Here's some speaker comparisons of the Infinity Kappas and the OEM:

The Infinity Kappa component system:

A shot of the door with all new components. I have to hold the tweeter because it needs to be mounted to the door panel, and this is the actual door interior:


Here is a picture detailing how I ran the wires through the center console:


Here is the amp underneath the seat. There's a shot with a $20 bill so you can see just how small this Class D amp is. As you can see, my wires are still loose and not tucked under the carpet. At the moment I am still adjusting gains and fine tuning the low/high pass filters.
The seat all the way forward to show the amp:

The size of the amp (I know this is an awful picture. Blame my iPhone 3GS):

The amp put in it's normal position. Notice that because of the small size, the heating/AC vent isn't blocked by anything more than speaker wire:

As for the head unit wiring diagram, I think the YouTube video on removing the head unit has instructions on how to find it. Once you have logged into the website, do a search under all content for "audio component." The file location for my head unit was:
2012 > Body Electrical System > Audio > Audio Unit > Components and Components Location > Components

Hopefully that answers some of your questions, but let me know if you have any others.
 

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Thank you so much for doing this. I've been reading the other posts and was on the fence to try it. But then my dad found my old Kenwood KAC-823 amp I used to have in my Lancer before I wrecked it and tested it to see that it works perfectly fine. I just need one of those line converters and I'll give it a shot myself. (Only have one sub, not that courageous to take the door speakers apart) lol
 
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