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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can doing clutch work make an Accent run rough? It feels like it's missing at least one cylinder.

Full story. The factory clutch on my 2003 Accent (2 dr, manual everything) gave out after 124000 miles. As it was out of warranty, I took it to a mechanic recommended by a coworker. The clutch he installed went after 10000 miles, then the replacement for that one went at 136000 miles. He replaced the clutch again, as well as the transmission throw bearing, and re-finished the flywheel. According to the mechanic, the throw bearing was allowing the drive shaft to shimmy, causing fast clutch wear. It shifts fine now, but it runs extremely rough and the check engine light comes on intermittently, which it wasn't doing before. I really don't want to take it back to him, as each fix has taken four or five tries before he gets it fixed, and this last time the car came back with arguably as many or more problems than it went in with. The thing I'm trying to figure out is how you make an engine misfire doing clutch work? Is there a sensor I don't know about?

If this is an easy fix (coil, plug wires) let me know. I used to work on motorcycles in college, and kept a friend's Suzuki Samurai running through grad school, but I'm not up on all this electronic stuff.

Thanks much!

EDIT- Good news everybody! I found a connector not plugged in, plugged it in and all is good with the world. There's an assembly on the top driver side of the engine that appears to house all the ignition wires. Coming off the driver side of this assembly is a five or six pin connector- it was unplugged. I plugged it in, made a sign of the cross, turned the key, and off I went. Thanks for the eyes, I've learned a lot just from browsing the forums.
 

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QUOTE (lopsotronic @ Aug 29 2010, 10:59 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=352738
Can doing clutch work make an Accent run rough? It feels like it's missing at least one cylinder.

Full story. The factory clutch on my 2003 Accent (2 dr, manual everything) gave out after 124000 miles. As it was out of warranty, I took it to a mechanic recommended by a coworker. The clutch he installed went after 10000 miles, then the replacement for that one went at 136000 miles. He replaced the clutch again, as well as the transmission throw bearing, and re-finished the flywheel. According to the mechanic, the throw bearing was allowing the drive shaft to shimmy, causing fast clutch wear. It shifts fine now, but it runs extremely rough and the check engine light comes on intermittently, which it wasn't doing before. I really don't want to take it back to him, as each fix has taken four or five tries before he gets it fixed, and this last time the car came back with arguably as many or more problems than it went in with. The thing I'm trying to figure out is how you make an engine misfire doing clutch work? Is there a sensor I don't know about?

If this is an easy fix (coil, plug wires) let me know. I used to work on motorcycles in college, and kept a friend's Suzuki Samurai running through grad school, but I'm not up on all this electronic stuff.

Thanks much!

EDIT- Good news everybody! I found a connector not plugged in, plugged it in and all is good with the world. There's an assembly on the top driver side of the engine that appears to house all the ignition wires. Coming off the driver side of this assembly is a five or six pin connector- it was unplugged. I plugged it in, made a sign of the cross, turned the key, and off I went. Thanks for the eyes, I've learned a lot just from browsing the forums.
In your position, I think it would be time to do 3 things, first, get a diagnostic code reader and see what the computer thinks is going on - I think there are some sensor issues, second, I'd find a new mechanic, and third, I would seriously consider taking the current mechanic to court.

The code readings should give you some clues about the poorly running engine.
 

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I have a 1996 honda prelude vtec. A friend of mine is insistent that I work on everything myself to save money. I have worked on my previous vehicles and am confident that I could work on this car myself as well. My issue is If i spend the money to take it to a shop, there is at least a small guarantee that if something goes wrong, THEY will pay to fix there error. If on the other hand I do all of the work myself, (replace both axels, install a camber kit, install all four shocks and springs, fix all oil leaks, replace the clutch, and fix the rough idle) there is no guarantee on anything. If anything goes wrong or I install something incorrectly (not really worried about installing the suspension wrong) or I just do a whole bunch of work and it ends up not fixing a problem or it creates another problem, I will have to pay even more money for parts. All of that is not mentioning the fact that It will take days of my own time to do all of that work, AND I probably do not have all of the tools needed to work on a lot of these things (which means running back and forth to oriellys or wherever to buy/rent tools,oil,grease, etc.) Long story short I am just not sure that I want to put all of the time and effort in to it and am not comfortable with my level of expertise ( I would basically just be reading a chiltons and relying on my friends knowledge). I would like everything to be perfectly done by a certified tech, like everything torqued to correct specs, I really dont want to have a ghetto *** job done by someone like myself who is not a certified mechanic and doesnt have all of the right tools. SO should I save the money and take my chances? OR take it to a shop, thereby having receipts of maintenance, records of work done and warrantys for myself and possible buyers when/if i try to sell it????? LONG question sorry. Any advice would be helpful, thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
QUOTE (Alfons @ Aug 29 2010, 07:16 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=352829
In your position, I think it would be time to do 3 things, first, get a diagnostic code reader and see what the computer thinks is going on - I think there are some sensor issues, second, I'd find a new mechanic, and third, I would seriously consider taking the current mechanic to court.

The code readings should give you some clues about the poorly running engine.
I really don't think the guy would have anything worthwhile for me to claim. His "shop" is basically just a vacant warehouse space, and I am not even certain if he has a lift. If he wasn't so cheap I wouldn't have even considered him, but as I mentioned, he was highly recommended by a co-worker. On the plus side, he is exceptionally honest, and hasn't charged anything beyond the first visit per problem. I don't know where he gets his parts, but he charges less than anything I can find on the internet. I don't think he wants to ever see this car again, though. He seems to work mostly on older, and simpler, domestic models that aren't built to the same tolerances as these newer models.

On the minus side, I'd rather pay a few more bucks for someone who can fix the problem on the first try. Within reason. I'm not going to shell out more than the old girl is worth.

Anyway, I got the car home and had a scheduled vacation to go on. Came back, drove to work, clutch is slipping again. Clutch pedal seems very soft, doesn't seem to engage engine until the top 2" of travel or so. Clutch fluid reservoir is full; I need an assistant to pump pedal while I look for bubbles. Is there a clutch pedal adjustment that can be easily made? Given the fact that he left something unplugged last time, I'd like to think that the last remaining problem is something as simple as a pedal adjustment.

I can't do car work in the parking lot at work but I might park in front of the hardware store next door after work and poke around under the dash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
QUOTE (lopsotronic @ Sep 21 2010, 08:57 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=357630
I can't do car work in the parking lot at work but I might park in front of the hardware store next door after work and poke around under the dash.
So the pedal is as far up as it can go and the clutch is still slipping. I am going to try pulling the choke valve out of the slave cylinder, as recommended in various places on these boards. After that I am officially out of ideas- the clutch, slave, and master are all new, flywheel machined (correctly), and the system has no bubbles or leaks.
 

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Sorry to be the bearer of bad news.

Slipping is not a cause of the slave cylinder or any part of the hydraulic system. If there was significant air in the system or even if it was completely empty, the problem you would see is that the clutch would not release at all. There would be no way to disengage the clutch. You probably wouldn't be able to shift into gear, and the pedal would drop to the floor.

The slave presses on a yoke when your foot is on the pedal. the yoke is suppose to slip into a groove on the throw-out bearing. When the slave presses on the yoke, it shoves the throw-out bearing into the fingers of the pressure plate, removing pressure off the clutch disk, thus releasing it.

One possible cause is that the yoke is not seated properly in the groove of the throwout bearing. Try seeing if you can force the slave back and get some play in the yoke.

Another is that the throw-out bearing is jammed or obstructed in some way. maybe the yoke is not seated on the pivot.

Also, if there is a lot of grease or oil on the clutch, it will definitely slip.
 
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