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Discussion Starter #1
Hello again awesome folks,

Planning on removing my throttle body to clean t. It's a 2004 Santa Fe 2.7L with 263xxx kms.

Assuming it's never been cleaned or replaced before and hoping to see a huge difference in performance.

Just want to make sure it's as straight forward as I'm assuming.

My particular question is, is the gasket reusable? Or will I definitely require a new one?

What about the PCM's relearning process? Technical or the typical several minutes of idling for several cold starts?

Any tips? Suggestions? Advice? Anything?

Planning on purchasing the throttle body cleaner tomorrow morning and going ahead with this, if all goes well, doing the same on my girlfriend's 2002 Jeep Grand Cherokee.

Thanks as usual in advance!
 

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Leave it in place.. nobody going to have gasket, so it be whenever for gasket to arrive.

Prop the blade open via stick on accell pedal in cabin, and use firm bristle tooth brush or fine wire brass brush to gently scrub the plate and bore..

Use PB Blaster first.. it dont evaporate like carb, and get good start on the crud. Finish off with carb.

I have a tube attached to a carb straw I feed into tract and aim at blade, then with engine running, I give random shots of carb to wash away remainders of stuff from initial cleaning, and rev engine (flip throttle and allow to snap shut) and squirt good as engine wind down to idle.. this will allow carb to splash off plate and get drawn into IAC port and help wash out what got in while doing the bore/plate cleaning
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Leave it in place.. nobody going to have gasket, so it be whenever for gasket to arrive.

Prop the blade open via stick on accell pedal in cabin, and use firm bristle tooth brush or fine wire brass brush to gently scrub the plate and bore..

Use PB Blaster first.. it dont evaporate like carb, and get good start on the crud. Finish off with carb.

I have a tube attached to a carb straw I feed into tract and aim at blade, then with engine running, I give random shots of carb to wash away remainders of stuff from initial cleaning, and rev engine (flip throttle and allow to snap shut) and squirt good as engine wind down to idle.. this will allow carb to splash off plate and get drawn into IAC port and help wash out what got in while doing the bore/plate cleaning
Do this with the car off right? What happens if some of the cleaner gets in the engine? Was planning on doing it with the part off for a more thorough clean with no risk of the cleaner getting where it shouldn't but yeah I def don't want to be stuck with needing a new gasket I won't be able to get for a while.

Waiting outside Canadian Tire right now for it to open so I can buy the cleaner and do this.

Thanks for the help, most likely spared me some issues.

Also realized today that in park or neutral it idles at 1500 rpms, and in drive at about 1000 rpms.
 

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Sounds like you may have issue with IAC either sticking or windings on motor corroding and weakening performance. You would do what Sbr711 suggested with car running....

I have a tube attached to a carb straw I feed into tract and aim at blade, then with engine running, I give random shots of carb to wash away remainders of stuff from initial cleaning, and rev engine (flip throttle and allow to snap shut) and squirt good as engine wind down to idle.. this will allow carb to splash off plate and get drawn into IAC port and help wash out what got in while doing the bore/plate cleaning
But do the setup first with tube with car off
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Done.

I was really hoping to remove the throttle body itself and really give it a good thorough clean but after what was posted I'm glad I didn't. Not only did I not have a gasket handy, but the entire piece itself almost looked seized to where it attaches and didn't seem like it would be easy to remove.

I simply removed the engine cover, removed the air filter housing and disconnected the hose from the TB. From there, with the car off, I sprayed some throttle body cleaner, cleaned with a cloth and brushed with a toothbrush and repeated until I noticed it was as clean as it would get.

One problem, I was parked behind my girlfriend and had to move my vehicle for her to get out. I was halfway through the process of cleaning the TB that I just started the car with everything open and moved it. Don't think it did any harm as it seems to start and run properly. I got a check engine code P0102 but removed it and doubt it will return.

Either way, car now idles at about 800 rpms as opposed to almost 1500, power feels better and overall smoother.

I was also successful in removing my girlfriends Jeep Grand Cherokee TB and completely cleaning it out inside and out, including the climate sensor. Wish I had been able to do this with the Santa Fe, next time.

Thanks so much again for all the info provided.

One question though, what purpose does a gasket have? Why are you not able to reuse the same one?
 

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They are only rubberized paper...after time fuel breaks it down and can allow for air to be sucked in causing a vacuum leak. If you take it apart they can either tear or just plain not seat properly being as they already have indentation from already being used

Congrats BTW, sounds like you tackled it like a pro with great results! Good job!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Awesome explanation! I've now got a great understanding. I always thought they were metal pieces from the images. The fact they're just a piece of foam almost make sense for the replacing.

I'm still adamant about getting the gasket and fully taking the TB apart to fully clean it out, the side facing towards the motor was hella dirty and I was unable to really do much to it with it attached.

Planning on making an instructional video/write-up for this and the Purge Valve for those in my situation wanting to do it for the first time.

Thanks again!!
 

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Awesome explanation! I've now got a great understanding. I always thought they were metal pieces from the images. The fact they're just a piece of foam almost make sense for the replacing.
Different cars do have different type gaskets... some are o-rings, others a type of plastic with rubber seals on them, and some are metal.... in your case however, it is the rubberized paper setup, and in any case when removing a component that utilizes a gasket to seal, it's good to replace it now matter the material used -if for any reason, to avoid having to do the same job over ;-)

Looking forward to your tutorial
 
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