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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a way to clean your cylinders? When I had the manifold off while replacing the spark plugs I noticed the cylinders were extremely dirty, full of gunk and very dark.

Is there a way to treat these or even cleaned the engine's interior??
 

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cleaning the engines interior = running synthetic oil. Cleaning the runners on the intake manifold and the throttle body = throttle body cleaner. Top tier gas will also help to keep your intake and throttle body clean.

I choose to run top tier gas and at least once each year use the throttle body cleaner. I also use Lucas upper manifold lubricant in each tank of gas. Seafoam is also a good product/alternative.

https://www.lucasoil.com/products/display_products_overviews.sd?iid=5&catid=6

Be Safe, Mark V.
 

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besides the seacrap and lucastrash, good advice.

however, i think the more important thing here is being missed. you say that the cylinders are 'full of gunk'. i'd love some more info here. are we talking about the typical thin layer of carbon buildup or are we talking about thick sticky burned oil buildup? obviously, trying to determine if there is an excess of oil getting into the cyldiners. what did the old plugs look like?

if its just a bit of carbon, don't worry yourself. this is perfectly normal for any engine and as long as the engine is running correctly it should never present a problem. unless there is excessive buildup (usually due to a problem, fix that first) the only surfaces that are going to have a huge impact are the cylinder walls and the sealing surfaces of the valves. it takes a LONG time and many many miles on the engine to create that kind of problem by normal wear and tear. by the time you get there (again, under normal circumstances) you've got bigger problems to worry about...such as the engine is completely worn out anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
besides the seacrap and lucastrash, good advice.

however, i think the more important thing here is being missed. you say that the cylinders are 'full of gunk'. i'd love some more info here. are we talking about the typical thin layer of carbon buildup or are we talking about thick sticky burned oil buildup? obviously, trying to determine if there is an excess of oil getting into the cyldiners. what did the old plugs look like?

if its just a bit of carbon, don't worry yourself. this is perfectly normal for any engine and as long as the engine is running correctly it should never present a problem. unless there is excessive buildup (usually due to a problem, fix that first) the only surfaces that are going to have a huge impact are the cylinder walls and the sealing surfaces of the valves. it takes a LONG time and many many miles on the engine to create that kind of problem by normal wear and tear. by the time you get there (again, under normal circumstances) you've got bigger problems to worry about...such as the engine is completely worn out anyways.
If guess normal wear. Thick black but no thicker than my throttle body was.

Would you recommend full synthetic from now on? I've never had it done on this vehicle and heard it can clean it so well that it will remove dirt that could be plugging seals and cause leaks. ???
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If guess normal wear. Thick black but no thicker than my throttle body was.

Would you recommend full synthetic from now on? I've never had it done on this vehicle and heard it can clean it so well that it will remove dirt that could be plugging seals and cause leaks. ???
Yes/no?
 

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Do you mean the cylinders or the inlet/exhaust ports - you won't see the cylinders while the head's still on.

If you mean the part of the cylinder at the very top, the part not reached by the piston rings then it "should" have a coating of carbon as it's self-limiting, ie it won't ever actually block the piston from moving and it helps compression. In days gone by when engines needed "decoking" that was the one area that the carbon isn't removed from.

If you mean the inlet/exhaust ports it's just another indication of poor health, like the throttle body. This is penalty for the North American approach of using lowest grade oil and trying to compensate by frequent OCI - but using much better grade oil is the answer, not that it's applicable to an older, high mileage engine.
 

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a different oil is a thought, but if you want to run something less expensive there's no reason you shouldn't....provided it meets minimum specs as defined in the OM. that being said, a better oil may help the problem. its hard to say.

again, its normal to see some buildup on the tops of the cylinders and in the throttle body. intake manifold can see a bit as well. this isn't usually a problem, it just doesn't look nice. plenty of the additive companies would love to tell you otherwise...one of the reasons i will never recommend any additive or cleaning product what so ever unless its a can of throttle body cleaner and a brush.

only things to do at this point would be to check the PCV valve (might be stuck) or a compression test if you really wanted to go all out...but at the same time there is no evidence to suggest that is necessary.

if you told me your car is blowing a lot of smoke that would be a different matter completely.

a final suggestion is to run premium fuel for a while and accelerate harder. bringing up the engine RPMs will increase internal pressure and help get rid of some of that crap. i understand this may not be an option due to the cost of premium fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah I meant under the manifold and where the plenum gasket goes.

I don't mind using the premium gas, in fact not only was I planing on doing so regularly but I've already started on the last fill up.

What are you saying using a better grade oil isn't applicable in an older high mileage vehicle? Can I not get a full synthetic oil change from now on?
 

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I don't mind using the premium gas, in fact not only was I planing on doing so regularly but I've already started on the last fill up.
i would actually recommend NOT using premium all the time. there is simply no need for that. in fact, i never use it. i suggested that as it has a higher concentration of detergents and usually no ethanol (that depends on where you live and where you get your fuel).

the idea is to get the engine internals heated up good with some fuel that has better chemistry.

i say don't use it all the time because there are NO benefits unless your car is designed for it - usually only turbo vehicles require that. there is no higher energy content or anything like that. you will not get better mileage nor will it make your engine last longer.

What are you saying using a better grade oil isn't applicable in an older high mileage vehicle? Can I not get a full synthetic oil change from now on?
i said nothing of the sort. if you want to toss synthetic in, go right ahead.

look, from what you're putting down here i think the situation comes down to this: you see the top of the cylinders and the throttle body during maintenance and now you're worried by a little carbon buildup.

this is completely normal! the inside of any engine is not meant to be clean!

unless you're telling me the old plugs came out wet with oil or pure black, there is no problem to worry about. no engine requires a cleaning just because there's some black in it.

if you want to use synthetic, go right ahead. there's no reason not to other than your cost. synthetic is proven to be a better oil. don't do it just for a problem that does not exist.
 

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so the questions that should never have to be asked are - what year SF are we discussing? What is the mileage on the engine?

You can switch to synthetic at any mileage. Some will argue that synthetic will remove internal sludge that leads to engine leaks....

credit to SBR711 - please fill in the 'location' and 'what you drive' boxes on your personal profile page. This information makes it much easier for other members to answer/comment on your posts.

Be Safe, Mark V.
 

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You can switch to synthetic at any mileage. Some will argue that synthetic will remove internal sludge that leads to engine leaks....
yes the age old debate...nobody seems to know for sure. i have read that old synthetics were bad for this and its not such an issue now...never been able to track down an answer.
 

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I've used Mobil One synthetic for almost a year, 15K, and I haven't regretted it at all. It made the motor seem "noisier" but she runs like a charm. No oil leaks to speak of.
 
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