Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
last week i did second oil change for my santafe. in first oil change tire pressure set to 35 psi, but on my second oil change tire pressure set to 33 psi. i was wondering what is the recommended value. next week end (labor day) i am planning for 1000 miles trip. do i need to reset it to 35 psi for better mileage. please advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
last week i did second oil change for my santafe. in first oil change tire pressure set to 35 psi, but on my second oil change tire pressure set to 33 psi. i was wondering what is the recommended value. next week end (labor day) i am planning for 1000 miles trip. do i need to reset it to 35 psi for better mileage. please advice.
Look on the drivers door sill. There is a sticker with a bunch of info, including the recommended tire pressure. Mine says 33 psi. When ever I get back from a dealer service I ALWAYS check my pressure. I don't know what kind of gauge the techs use but it never is the same as mine. I trust mine. Some times I get a different reading on all 4 tires, so I use mine to get it equal on all 4. I really don't think they are that careful with reading the pressures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
higher air pressure always equal better fuel mileage but a more harsh ride. 33 psi was probably Hyundai's comfortable medium. I run mine at 38 psi, ride is still good, little more harsh, but gained 1.5 mpg over 33 psi. Prius's and other hybrids usually run around 40 to 45 psi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
What is the effect on the tires' structural integrity running it at a higher pressure? They heat up while driving, wouldn't it wear faster and be prone to blowouts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
Tyres overheat far more running under pressure than overpressure - but in fact it's not "over" pressure until you exceed the maximum pressure marked on the tyre wall - up to that point it's simply high pressure.

Going above manufacturers recommendation will be reducing the contact area, which is never good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
Tyres overheat far more running under pressure than overpressure - but in fact it's not "over" pressure until you exceed the maximum pressure marked on the tyre wall - up to that point it's simply high pressure.

Going above manufacturers recommendation will be reducing the contact area, which is never good.
++1 It also causes the tire to wear faster on the center of the tread.
 

·
SENIOR MODERATOR
Joined
·
9,284 Posts
I found that over-inflating the tires on my Elantra (35 instead of the sticker suggested 32) lead to very nervous and flighty highway speed (55 mph +) handling that required almost constant correction. Lowering it to 32 not only almost eliminated the nervousness but had almost no discernible effect on fuel mileage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
The sticker pressure on my RoW CM model is 32 all-round but this leads to shoulder wear on all 4 tyres - by experimentation I've found that 36 front and 32 rear is a good compromise between even wear and ride harshness.

In reality, the specific tyre characteristics play a significant part in what is, or isn't, acceptable, as well as the nature of the local roads. I'll be changing tyres soon to a completely different brand and although I'll start at 36/32 I may find different pressures suit the new tyres better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Santa Fe Sport 2.0T SE AWD - Tire pressure

Hi, I have recently bought Santa Fe Sport 2.0T SE AWD(2015). The tire pressure when we took the car from dealer was:

Front left : 42 Front right: 42
Rear left : 42 Rear Right: 42

I checked the specs and it says 34psi all tires.

I have reduced the pressure from 42 to 40 just to be safe as tire says 51psi Max. Is it ok to have this or have to reduce it to 34psi.

We are planning a 423 km ride tomorrow. Please suggest. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
868 Posts
I personally would run it at the recommended pressure listed on the door jamb, maybe a little higher if loaded. Higher pressure will give you slightly better mileage but the trade off is a slightly stiffer ride. Remember, check tire pressure when the tire is cold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Thanks mogleybear, reus49 for the suggestions.

This is what i felt today - 40 psi. While turning the car at corners tires seems bit pressing to rim. Or may be just my new car mind.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
the sticker on the door jam, is for OEM tires only. if you have changed your tires, those psi numbers may not matter anymore.

here is my 'general' guide to tire psi:

under-inflated (-10 - -20psi) = have a larger contact patch, and flex more; resulting in increasing temps. that could cause an explosion on a long term trip. the wear will be on the outsides.

over-inflated (+10psi - +20psi) = have a smaller contact patch dont flex as much; resulting in less chances of increased psi. but they are more prone to explosions from pot-holes, and have a louder, rougher ride. some people report feeling every little skip in the road.

dont forget that in your area there might be serious road surface temps (arizona, cali, new mexico, tex, florida, etc) thus that heat having a direct effect on your tires. so you might want to amend your psi to the ambient temps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,803 Posts
What is the effect on the tires' structural integrity running it at a higher pressure? They heat up while driving, wouldn't it wear faster and be prone to blowouts?
You are safe as long as yo do not exceed the maximum cold pressure listed on the sidewall of the tire. Most tires today have a max cold pressure of 44 PSI. I run mine close to 40 in front as that prevents wear on the edges and better mpg but everyone has their own thoughts. Again, the sidewall is the max, the door simply tells you what the manufacturer feels is the best all around PSI for ride etc.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
I run mine close to 40 in front as that prevents wear on the edges and better mpg
that also creates over-steer. the tires round off (which is what prevents wear on edges) and acts like a ball. you really only want this in the snowy winters. a rounder tires allows the slush to escape the treads better, an also cuts through snow better. wider tires are worse on snow.

tire inflation techniques & advice is about as big of a can of worms, as an oil thread LOLOL

i personally have learned a great deal from the racetrack. i raced my racebike, and realized how important tire psi really is. i check it regularly, and act accordingly to the ambient temps, driving style, length of trip, vehicle load, etc.

in the spring & fall, i will have it at about 32-35psi(give or take 2-3psi).
in the summer i will raise that to about 36-38psi(to achieve a smaller contact patch, and reduce tire flex; which raises tire temps, which raises the internal psi)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Just put new tires on my 2013 SFS. Got them at Costco and they feel very different from the Continentals that were on there before. The brand I bought is Bridgestone and the specific model is DUELER H/L 422 235/55R19. Gotta take the thing for an alignment in the morning. Funny thing, only one of the four tires that I just replaced was the original, the other three were replaced at various times over the past four years. So without knowing the history, they have insisted I take it in. So, going in the A.M. Better safe than sorry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Has anyone purchased the portable tire inflators that plug into the cigarette lighter? They are supposed to inflate the tires without using an air compressor.


I have tried two different units and both times the fuse on my 2014 Sport blew. I think it is a 15 amp.


Also, is there any differences in fuses? Some say that the most fuses are made in China and they blow whereas an American Made fuse is better? Any input here?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Has anyone purchased the portable tire inflators that plug into the cigarette lighter? They are supposed to inflate the tires without using an air compressor.


I have tried two different units and both times the fuse on my 2014 Sport blew. I think it is a 15 amp.


Also, is there any differences in fuses? Some say that the most fuses are made in China and they blow whereas an American Made fuse is better? Any input here?
Ironically, my little tire inflator blew the fuse on my 2017 Sport, and on my wife's 2015 Sonata. The inflator is over 10 years old, so I figured it was on its last leg (plus it has been very hot here in AZ). I can't blame the fuses, since the metal ring on the plug of the inflator was VERY hot. So the fuses did their job.

I was hoping a newer inflator would stop the fuses from blowing, but perhaps not. Maybe I'll just get a battery booster/tire inflator combo unit.

To get back on topic, when I bought my '17 SFS the psi on all of the wheels were way too high--as in 55psi on several. I didn't notice any issue with driving, nor did any tire pressure warnings appear. For sure MPG was better that first week (i.e., higher than claimed MPG).



Mike
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top