Hyundai Forums banner
1 - 20 of 150 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know what kind of spark plugs are installed at the factory? I'm thinking of putting in some Bosch plugs if the factory ones aren't that good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
759 Posts
You can easily go 200,000+ km on the original sparkplugs with today's engines. As they are so new... you probably wouldn't notice any difference what so ever at this point in time... maybe not even after 100,000k.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
A spark plug has a pretty simple job to do.
i beg to differ.
there are cheaper/entry level spark plugs like champion, Autolite, ACDelco, Denso, Accel, Motorcraft, that will not last or offer the same service life as NGK, Bosch. There is a reason why all Japanese and German engines come with NGK and or Bosch

In most cases, the cheapest ones you can get do just fine.
again, i beg to differ.
the most important feature of a sparkplug is what the electrode tip and core are made of. Some of the cheaper plugs have the electrode core material as copper, while the better class of plugs are platinum, iridium, nickle.
That also applies to the tip itself; some are cheap copper, nickle-iron, chromium, while the more expensive tips are longer lasting platinum or even Iridium.

And some of the more "exotic" new designs really aren't worth crap.......except to take away your money. ;)
it depends. some are designed to provide a better spark. while others are really, as you said: a gimmick.
will better plugs increase power that you can feel? not at all. will it create a better spark that will help burn the fuel better? YES. that means: the less work your Catalytic Converter has to do. (furthermore that will help with the combustion process, which results in better mpg's, and all around better performance- but nothing you can feel.) the only time you can feel better performance is if you take out totally fouled plugs.

also note: not all plugs are designed for the specific heat range that they will be operating in. if you buy a cheaper plug that will not perform as well in the given heat range, you can easily melt it, crack it, and cause serious problems. If the tip of the spark plug is too hot it can cause pre-ignition or sometimes knocking/detonation and damage may occur. If it is too cold, electrically conductive deposits may form on the insulator causing a loss of spark energy or the actual shorting-out of the spark current.

to the original poster: call your dealer to find out what your car has. even some of the lowest quality plugs will last around 40,000-60,000 miles. no need to change them before that. the less you are tampering with your aluminum head, the better. i have seen plenty people try and change the plugs and end up ruining the threads in the head, and cause thousands in damage. im not saying you are dumb by any means- but you know that old saying: 'dont fix what aint broken' :p

just copied some info from some manufacturers:
"One of the main benefits of using iridium in spark plugs is its extremely high melting point - nearly 2500ºC."

"Bosch Platinum IR Fusion mixes two different materials together to increase performance. The center electrode contains a platinum/iridium blend, while the ground electrodes feature yttrium enhancements for better performance"
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,850 Posts
i beg to differ.

will it create a better spark that will help burn the fuel better? YES.

even some of the lowest quality plugs will last around 40,000-60,000 miles. no need to change them before that.
You can beg to differ all you want but tests have been done.....over and over and over ad. nauseum and the results are:
A spark is a spark. "Better" plugs will last longer but OEM plugs in about everything except lawn mowers anymore are of the "long lasting" type already.

Which is what you seem to have said in the last sentence. That's pretty much what I was trying to say in my post too.
Maybe you don't differ so much after all ???? :D

Just because Bosch says that their plugs costing 10X what a "standard" one does are better......doesn't necessarily make it true.
A spark is still just a spark.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
You can beg to differ all you want but tests have been done.....over and over and over ad nauseum and the results are:
A spark is a spark. "Better" plugs will last longer but OEM plugs in about everything except lawn mowers anymore are of the "long lasting" type already.
care to post those results/test?

and if a spark is a spark, then you must think a signal is a signal - so any wire will do?

i still stand by my views (and thankfully professional racing companies and manufacturers do as well) precious metals such as platinum or gold/palladium provide for greater durability and lower voltage requirements. Fine-wire center electrodes provide better sparking and enhanced ignitability. Fine-wire ground electrodes further improve the ignitability of the plug. Special configurations are used for the insulator noses to improve throttle response.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
You can beg to differ all you want but tests have been done.....over and over and over ad. nauseum and the results are: A spark is a spark.
hey i noticed you have a bike! :) i do as well. check this video out

 

·
Registered
2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport 2.0t limited
Joined
·
274 Posts
Stock spark plug are already IRIDIUM coated...

Here from the maintenance guide in the owners manual :

(45000 miles /72000km service)

- Replace spark plugs (iridium coated - 2.0 TGDI)

same for the 2.4 GDI but at 105 000 miles service...
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
Stock spark plug are already IRIDIUM coated...

Here from the maintenance guide in the owners manual :

(45000 miles /72000km service)

- Replace spark plugs (iridium coated - 2.0 TGDI)

same for the 2.4 GDI but at 105 000 miles service...
awesome, thank you.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,850 Posts
care to post those results/test?
If you really care, do a web search.

Places like Road and Track, Car and Driver, Consumer Reports all have done tests over the years. Once you exceed a certain threshold and make a spark sufficient to ignite the mixture......any extra spark is just wasted, as are any additional costs to produce a "better" spark.

I sense that this could turn into a heated arguement so I'll stop there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,282 Posts
Agreed, I have seen these reports as well. You will for sure see a difference in spark plug performance if you are comparing a cheapy with a brand name. However, like mentioned, once beyond a certain point of performance they all achieve the same result.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
If you really care, do a web search.

Places like Road and Track, Car and Driver, Consumer Reports all have done tests over the years. Once you exceed a certain threshold and make a spark sufficient to ignite the mixture......any extra spark is just wasted, as are any additional costs to produce a "better" spark.

I sense that this could turn into a heated arguement so I'll stop there.
no arguement at all buddy; we are all here to share/learn/chat. :D

what you just said, cleared everything up for those who don't know (and thats exactly where i was going with this): "Once you exceed a certain threshold and make a spark sufficient to ignite the mixture......any extra spark is just wasted". thats 100% true. what i simply wanted to do was further define your original claims that all spark-plugs are the same. (which we agree, that not all are)

i just want to add, that in certain engines that use two spark-plugs per cylinder (DODGE HEMI) its imperative to use high quality plugs for that engine to perform as needed. some other spark-plugs are sensitive to high heat, and can end up running red-hot; hot enough to pre-ignite the fuel. so its important to know that not all plugs are created equal, and often cheaper plugs will need to be replaced much sooner/more often.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,850 Posts
your original claims that all spark-plugs are the same. (which we agree, that not all are)
I never said that "all spark plugs are the same".

I did say " a spark is a spark" and any plug that produces a sufficient spark should work just fine.......for a while. ;)

And there are always exceptions, your example of a high performance "racing" engine being just one. That really has no bearing on our little street engines though.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
And there are always exceptions, your example of a high performance "racing" engine being just one. That really has no bearing on our little street engines though.
did you just call a HEMI, a "high performance racing" engine? lololololololol. its the biggest POS if ever seen. total sales gimmick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
Over my driving "career", engines and spark plugs have moved on a huge amount - back in the '50s production engines all used the same heat range of plug with only specialised engines needing anything special - nowadays the engine emission systems and consistency of road fuel mean that the spark plug is working in a much more consistent environment so far less likely to fail - modern engineers are far more capable in defing the exact specification needed for a specific engine.

The twin side electrode type that GM Europe were using from the mid-90s onwards were good for 40,000 miles as scheduled and would probably last twice that before engine running issues became obvious to the driver and the quad side electrode type would often outlast the car.

It's strange how brand perception alters across the "pond" - in Europe NGK and Bosch are no better than Champion, Delco, etc - NGK are often supplied as OE on Japanese cars, but of marginally different specification that common brands in Europe have no equivalent - Bosch are just another European manufacturer, well regarded for their +4 range but same as for the others.

My advice is to replace spark plugs at Hyundai's recommended interval, using Hyundai's specification. Don't mess with the specification and don't expect benefits by changing early.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
The right plugs

The factory plugs are just right for the engine, sometimes changing brands they offer new ideas but often they are not right for your heat range needed this is so important, most don't know they make many plugs that will fit your car but are not the right heat range required, some tune up parts to me just need to be the OEM if the same plug can be found outside of the dealer buy the exact part number
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,850 Posts
The factory plugs are just right for the engine,
Or to put it a different way:
It is extremely unlikely that ANY different plug will be any better.
Plugs are fairly inexpensive, especially when you figure in how long they last these days........so don't "go cheap" if you really don't need to. ;)
 
1 - 20 of 150 Posts
Top