Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 20 of 70 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Pick mine up tomorrow 4 weeks not bad. What are the oil change intervals- miles or metric?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Pick mine up tomorrow 4 weeks not bad. What are the oil change intervals- miles or metric?
You can find the recommended oil change intervals in the owner's manual

It really all depends on the type of driving that you do. I am a chemist (I guess you would have never guessed that by my screen name & avatar:mellow:). I used to manage a lab for a local Caterpillar dealer analyzing oil and coolant.

The thing that you have to remember is that as the engine runs it create wear metals which are suspended in the oil. The larger stuff is caught by the oil filter, but the smaller wear metal particles are suspended in the oil and are abrasive.

The longer the oil remains in the engine, the more abrasive wear will take place. Byproducts of combustion will also be in the oil. Water can be present in oil through condensation (taking short trips without the engine having a chance to warm up enough to drive off the water) and combustion. Gasoline contains small amounts of sulfer. Sulfer can combine with water to make H2SO4 or sulfuric acid. We all know what acid can do to metal!

I am not a big fan of synthetic oil. Sure, the oil will last longer than conventional oil, but it entices people to extend oil drain intervals. Now you have great oil contaminated with wear metals that can abraissively shorten engine life.

I could go on here for hours, but the point I am trying to make is that oil is cheap, a new engine is not. Change the oil frequently to prevent wear. Change at the recommended time interval, if you have not exceeded the recommended mileage.

I live 1.3 miles from the lab where I work. I change the oil in my 2011 Santa Fe AWD Limited every 3 months regardless of the mileage. This will ensure a long trouble free engine life. Now a catastrophic failure can always occur, but at least I am doing my part to ensure long trouble free service from my vehicle.

Good luck with your new purchase! If you get a chance, please post back and let me know how the seating comfort is. I hate the seats in my 2011 and am considering purchasing a.LWB myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
I am not a big fan of synthetic oil. Sure, the oil will last longer than conventional oil, but it entices people to extend oil drain intervals. Now you have great oil contaminated with wear metals that can abraissively shorten engine life.
It doesn't work like that in practice - Europe runs 20,000 mile OCIs on synthetic - engines still last !

It's down to tightly regulated standards for fuel and oil - the engines are the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,789 Posts
I live 1.3 miles from the lab where I work. I change the oil in my 2011 Santa Fe AWD Limited every 3 months regardless of the mileage. This will ensure a long trouble free engine life. Now a catastrophic failure can always occur, but at least I am doing my part to ensure long trouble free service from my vehicle.
.
Did the UOA you did on your own vehicle convince you that 3 months was the interval? How many UOA did you do to get the trend that 3 months was it? If not what was the evidence that led to the 3 months? Tradition, prior engine failure or? Granted, a 1.3 mile trip and no other driving to heat up that engine is terrible, especially in the winter months.

Most engines today outlive the rest of the vehicle regardless of the frequency of oil changes but yea, a dino and filter for under $20 every 3 months, if that is what lets you sleep at night keep on doing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Did the UOA you did on your own vehicle convince you that 3 months was the interval? How many UOA did you do to get the trend that 3 months was it? If not what was the evidence that led to the 3 months? Tradition, prior engine failure or? Granted, a 1.3 mile trip and no other driving to heat up that engine is terrible, especially in the winter months.

Most engines today outlive the rest of the vehicle regardless of the frequency of oil changes but yea, a dino and filter for under $20 every 3 months, if that is what lets you sleep at night keep on doing it.
I did no trending on my current vehicle. I just change oil at 3 month intervals because of the extremely short trip to work. My engine is not even at operating temperature by the time I arrive.

I make sure to take it on extended trips on the weekends.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
You can find the recommended oil change intervals in the owner's manual

It really all depends on the type of driving that you do. I am a chemist (I guess you would have never guessed that by my screen name & avatar:mellow:). I used to manage a lab for a local Caterpillar dealer analyzing oil and coolant.

The thing that you have to remember is that as the engine runs it create wear metals which are suspended in the oil. The larger stuff is caught by the oil filter, but the smaller wear metal particles are suspended in the oil and are abrasive.

The longer the oil remains in the engine, the more abrasive wear will take place. Byproducts of combustion will also be in the oil. Water can be present in oil through condensation (taking short trips without the engine having a chance to warm up enough to drive off the water) and combustion. Gasoline contains small amounts of sulfer. Sulfer can combine with water to make H2SO4 or sulfuric acid. We all know what acid can do to metal!

I am not a big fan of synthetic oil. Sure, the oil will last longer than conventional oil, but it entices people to extend oil drain intervals. Now you have great oil contaminated with wear metals that can abraissively shorten engine life.

I could go on here for hours, but the point I am trying to make is that oil is cheap, a new engine is not. Change the oil frequently to prevent wear. Change at the recommended time interval, if you have not exceeded the recommended mileage.

I live 1.3 miles from the lab where I work. I change the oil in my 2011 Santa Fe AWD Limited every 3 months regardless of the mileage. This will ensure a long trouble free engine life. Now a catastrophic failure can always occur, but at least I am doing my part to ensure long trouble free service from my vehicle.

Good luck with your new purchase! If you get a chance, please post back and let me know how the seating comfort is. I hate the seats in my 2011 and am considering purchasing a.LWB myself.
great post. i agree with you 100%
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
Pick mine up tomorrow 4 weeks not bad. What are the oil change intervals- miles or metric?
it depends on which engine you took: naturally aspirated or the turbo engine.

picking a number out of the sky like: 20,000 is the wrong thing to do. every driver has the car under different uses and climates - so what works for one, doesnt for the other.


  • is your car turbo or not? do yourself a favor and change your oil a little more often, especially in the summer months. heat & oil starvation is the number 1 reasons turbo's die. (also allow proper warm up and cool down times before driving off or turning the engine off.)
  • do you live in hot climates like texas, florida, arizona, etc. dont worry about the planet so much, and save yourself a hassle. keep yourself around 4,000-7,500 mile oil changes (however you see fit. i suggest synth oil, as early as possible in the summer months)
  • whats your mileage? do you have high mileage already? get an Oil Analysis done and see whats going on. you might not be a candidate for 20,000 mile extended drains. also, some older engines seem to eat more synth/thinner oils. seals/rings do wear with time and it could cause your consumption to rise. ALL ENGINES EAT OIL: its part of the PCV system. its normal. watch your engine, especially higher mileage engine for it; add oil as needed.
  • some climates have very high humidity. Engine oil is hygroscopic (it absorbs moisture from the air) even if you dont use your car often, simply by driving short distances - it will not give it enough time to burn off the moisture, so it will only add to the problem.
  • what oil filter are you using? not all filters are built alike. some have cardboard, some have rubber, some are X amount of pleats while other are less. you have to use a filter thats rated for the miles you intend to drive
as you see, oil change intervals are not as easy, as some like to make it out to be. just because OIL can last that X amount of miles (as per the bottle) that doesnt mean that X AMOUNT OF MILES is going to be ok in all cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
it depends on which engine you took: naturally aspirated or the turbo engine.

picking a number out of the sky like: 20,000 is the wrong thing to do. every driver has the car under different uses and climates - so what works for one, doesnt for the other.


  • is your car turbo or not? do yourself a favor and change your oil a little more often, especially in the summer months. heat & oil starvation is the number 1 reasons turbo's die. (also allow proper warm up and cool down times before driving off or turning the engine off.)
  • do you live in hot climates like texas, florida, arizona, etc. dont worry about the planet so much, and save yourself a hassle. keep yourself around 4,000-7,500 mile oil changes (however you see fit. i suggest synth oil, as early as possible in the summer months)
  • whats your mileage? do you have high mileage already? get an Oil Analysis done and see whats going on. you might not be a candidate for 20,000 mile extended drains. also, some older engines seem to eat more synth/thinner oils. seals/rings do wear with time and it could cause your consumption to rise. ALL ENGINES EAT OIL: its part of the PCV system. its normal. watch your engine, especially higher mileage engine for it; add oil as needed.
  • some climates have very high humidity. Engine oil is hygroscopic (it absorbs moisture from the air) even if you dont use your car often, simply by driving short distances - it will not give it enough time to burn off the moisture, so it will only add to the problem.
  • what oil filter are you using? not all filters are built alike. some have cardboard, some have rubber, some are X amount of pleats while other are less. you have to use a filter thats rated for the miles you intend to drive
as you see, oil change intervals are not as easy, as some like to make it out to be. just because OIL can last that X amount of miles (as per the bottle) that doesnt mean that X AMOUNT OF MILES is going to be ok in all cars.
Why would you want to have cleaner oil in summer rather than winter?
I think Winter (low temperatures) wears you engine more than Summer because of longer friction below ideal temperature at engine start.
That applies especially if you use synthetic oil, which handles high temperatures very well.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
Why would you want to have cleaner oil in summer rather than winter?
whats oils #1 arch enemy? HEAT
when you turn your car off in the summer months, it takes much-much longer for your oil to cool down. thus spending more time more time in conditions that shorten its optimal condition
PLUS: heat is also the number killer of turbo's. and since oil is the blood-line of turbo bearings = i highly suggest keeping a fresher supply of oil for your turbo to work with.

I think Winter (low temperatures) wears you engine more than Summer because of longer friction below ideal temperature at engine start.
yes, i agree. but we are not talking about which season hurts your engine the most. we are talking about which season takes a harder toll on your oil.
by theory you are correct - that colder months = thicker oil = longer it takes for oil pressure to build up and lube all your internal parts. but thats not stress on your oil. thats stress on moving parts.


That applies especially if you use synthetic oil, which handles high temperatures very well.
all oils have their specific flow rates. synth or conventional - both oils have requirements that require the oil to have a specific flow rate in a given temp range. synth oils have more stabilizers and detergents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
I read in a car magazine that one of the hardest things on an engine, as far as wear, is changing the oil more often then your driving conditions require.

People that are conned into changing their oil twice as often as necessary, by the dealerships, are not doing their engine any favor.
The smaller percentage of owners that actually should change their oil more often, due to severe driving conditions, should of course follow the severe driving maintenence schedule.

Most car owner's manuals have a severe and a regular maintence schedule. Usually there is a key word like "PRIMARILY"under the severe conditions.
Tom
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
I read in a car magazine that one of the hardest things on an engine, as far as wear, is changing the oil more often then your driving conditions require.
That does not make any sense. you either read it wrong, or you read an article written by a straight up lying tree hugger.

then why do all the racing teams change the oil after every race? (even when the race was nothing short of a few hundred miles - if that)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
I read in a car magazine that one of the hardest things on an engine, as far as wear, is changing the oil more often then your driving conditions require.
I've never heard that and can't believe there's any truth in it.

Being European, our DM Santa Fe's are scheduled by Hyundai for oil changes every 20,000 miles or 2 years, using only full synthetic of a tightly regulated specification - but even I can't accept that more frequent oil changing is actually harmful to the engine.

The definition of severe conditions varies by country - but always clearly defined, either your use pattern is severe according to your car's manual or it isn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
Changing the oil too frequently does affect the oil pan and the plug. Plugs are not big deal, as they are cheap and easy to replace if they strip out.

Oil pans are another matter. The threads on the oil pan can easily be damaged by cross threading the plug, or, over tightening the plug when installing.

How many oil change guys do you thing use anything but their judgement when replacing an oil plug? How many times is the guy too lazy to walk over and get a fresh washer when doing an oil change? The old washer, with an extra twist on the plug, should be enough to prevent drips - and a complaint.

Dealers make a ton of cash in their service department. Car companies are spending less per car on warranty repair, due to better quality and ability to spot assembly problems sooner. Keeping you spending on your car is the way they stay in business.

My local Hyundai dealer now does alignment checks on every car coming in for service for "free". Of course their aim is to sell alignments.

They also recently doubled the price of their air filters, which they always check and often want to replace. A friend of mine recently had an oil change and noticed the price doubling from the last time he had the filter replaced. He caught it, most won't.

Another trick the dealers are starting to use in my area is the "free lifetime warranty". This "free" ad on requires you to do a bunch of services that are above and beyond what Hyundai requires to keep their warranty active.

Most amount to inspections of various components. For my friend's Elantra - approaching 30,000 miles, this amounted to about $300 (which did include the inflated price on the air filter).

Free ain't what it used to be!!

Be cautious when entering the service bay. They are as skilled as the sales people and the finance office at finding ways to extract extra profit from the sale of the car.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
Changing the oil too frequently does affect the oil pan and the plug. Plugs are not big deal, as they are cheap and easy to replace if they strip out.
where do you guys make this stuff up from? lol
"affects the oil pan & plug"??? as long as you dont over tighten it to the point that you strip threads - then you are fine.

i have never heard of a pan that needed to be replaced because someone did to many oil changes. its like saying "dont use your door so much - as it will need replacing due to over use, leave your window open and climb in that way!" lololol


Oil pans are another matter. The threads on the oil pan can easily be damaged by cross threading the plug, or, over tightening the plug when installing.
yes, and this can happen on your first oil change, or your 10,000th oil change. its all due to mechanic error. thats why i change my own and save money.


How many times is the guy too lazy to walk over and get a fresh washer when doing an oil change? The old washer, with an extra twist on the plug, should be enough to prevent drips - and a complaint
hate to break it to you - almost no one ever, in any place changes the crush washer. they charge you and tell you they do it - but its never done. heck, iv never changed any of my own crush washers in any car or racebike, street bike = and never a single issue. millions of miles combined on all engines, transaxles, differentials.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
Changing the oil too frequently does affect the oil pan and the plug. Plugs are not big deal, as they are cheap and easy to replace if they strip out.
Sorry, that just makes no sense to me.
If you mean the more you do it the more probability of doing something wrong... that is a different story.
I would only agree if you add to the equation your valuable time spend in something which is obviously not necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
Not believing something you read in the Internet is definitely a right that you have.:)

It's simple wear and tear on the oil pan threads.

Over tighten and you'll likely strip out the oil pan threads before the drain plug - because of the material used to make the different components.

Change the oil at twice the recommended interval and the oil pan threads get twice the wear anticipated.

Do a quick Google for over-sized oil plugs, and you'll quickly find a ton of stories about the drain pans being stripped on various cars over the years. Not a new issue, or specifically related to Hyundai.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Changing the oil too frequently does affect the oil pan and the plug. Plugs are not big deal, as they are cheap and easy to replace if they strip out.

Oil pans are another matter. The threads on the oil pan can easily be damaged by cross threading the plug, or, over tightening the plug when installing.

How many oil change guys do you thing use anything but their judgement when replacing an oil plug? How many times is the guy too lazy to walk over and get a fresh washer when doing an oil change? The old washer, with an extra twist on the plug, should be enough to prevent drips - and a complaint.

Dealers make a ton of cash in their service department. Car companies are spending less per car on warranty repair, due to better quality and ability to spot assembly problems sooner. Keeping you spending on your car is the way they stay in business.

My local Hyundai dealer now does alignment checks on every car coming in for service for "free". Of course their aim is to sell alignments.

They also recently doubled the price of their air filters, which they always check and often want to replace. A friend of mine recently had an oil change and noticed the price doubling from the last time he had the filter replaced. He caught it, most won't.

Another trick the dealers are starting to use in my area is the "free lifetime warranty". This "free" ad on requires you to do a bunch of services that are above and beyond what Hyundai requires to keep their warranty active.

Most amount to inspections of various components. For my friend's Elantra - approaching 30,000 miles, this amounted to about $300 (which did include the inflated price on the air filter).

Free ain't what it used to be!!

Be cautious when entering the service bay. They are as skilled as the sales people and the finance office at finding ways to extract extra profit from the sale of the car.
IF you take your car to the dealership regularly for service, changing the air filter is a good test of their honesty. One of the reasons I did not purchase another Lincoln when I bought my Azera is the fact that I had changed my air filter in my Lincoln before taking it in for an oil change. While I waited in the waiting area, the tech came in with a dirty air filter in his hand and said that I needed to change my air filter. I proceeded to tell him that not only did I not need to change my air filter, but that the air filter he was holding did not even fit my car. I then took him out to my car in the service area and removed the old filter from the trunk of my car to show him it was a totally different size of filter. The service manager and I had a long talk about their business practices and the fact that every time I had my car in for service I ended up taking it home and having to clean the carpets and floor mats because of the greasy foot prints on my tan carpet. I also stood there while they drained the oil and changed the oil filter because I no longer trusted them. Needless to say, that was the last time I ever went back to that dealership for anything. On a side note, a few months later that dealership lost their Lincoln franchise and now sell Kia. I will give the Hyundai dealer the benefit of the doubt and have my oil changed there as long as they don't try to over-sell services that I don't need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
Change the oil at twice the recommended interval and the oil pan threads get twice the wear anticipated.
I'm used to differences of opinion on car-related topics - but I just can't believe that anyone seriously thinks thinks this is an issue.

To make your argument stick, you need to come up with the design life in number of oil changes that the sump pan threads and sump plug threads are designed to last for - in relation to the design life of the engine as a whole are you seriously suggesting that a whole engine design life of, say, 300,000 miles uses a sump pan and plug designed for 50 operations and will fail if subjected to 100 operations?
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
2,258 Posts
It's simple wear and tear on the oil pan threads.
threads that are plastic or wood will have wear & tear issue = not metal (unless deformed due to wrong thread pitch being used, or extreme over tightening). that's a FACT.
there has never in the history of mankind, been an issue of oil pan threads wearing out due to "to many oil changes". heck, if wearing threads is an issue, then why does the "worm gear" gear-set exist? according to you, the threading on the gear would wear out ever so quickly! ;)


Over tighten and you'll likely strip out the oil pan threads before the drain plug - because of the material used to make the different components.
you are correct. but, dont mistaken "overtighten-ing" which is "ABUSE", with "USE". "use" and "abuse" are two very different things. simply using your threads by removing & inserting a bolt, versus bending the thread pitch by way of over torquing the steel bolt on an aluminum pan, thus stripping the the thread = is ABUSE.
simply removing your lug nuts often is not going to cause your studs to wear out its threading. the only time your studs or lug nuts will wear out, is when you over tighten your lug nuts by jumping on them over and over, applying well over the 75-100 ft-lbs of TQ they generally require on uni-body passenger vehicles.

Change the oil at twice the recommended interval and the oil pan threads get twice the wear anticipated.
this is a non-issue.
I guess you open the door instead of using the window, when depositing the change in the toll booth, to not wear the gear set & cable in the window actuator? lol

Do a quick Google for over-sized oil plugs, and you'll quickly find a ton of stories about the drain pans being stripped on various cars over the years. Not a new issue, or specifically related to Hyundai.
again, oil pans strip due to ABUSE, not due to "USE". stories about people who over torque the steel bolts on aluminum pans are a common, as those who over-torque lug nuts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
Agree Agree Agree!!!

The issue with oil pan stripping is over tightening the oil plug.

The longevity of your oil pan is directly related to the care taken by the people doing the oil change.

My personal experience is that those allocated to this task at the dealership tend to be less than the most highly skilled of their mechanics. Thus, a higher tendency for error in their work.

I've personally experienced a stripped out oil pan thread situation and the offending shop 's insurance made it right. Pan cost about $500 + installation and a new oil fill.

Anybody that doesn't believe that there is stress put on the threads in an oil pan, when the drain plug is re-inserted, is free to believe this. Fact is that the plug would not remain in the pan without sufficient torque being applied to the plug.

Too much torque and you put excess stress on the threads, which will eventually lead them to fail.

Just saying that the guy who spends his days down in the oil change pit, with hot mufflers and exhaust pipes 6 inches over his head all day, might not take the same care that you would take with your car.
 
1 - 20 of 70 Posts
Top