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...and this has something to do with ATF change, sounds a lot like spam!
 

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AT's use to be self contained, only thing left is the planetary gear train, clutches, and the electrical solenoids to turn them on and off. Oh, and that pawl that drops into a gear when in park that can break off if someone bumps you. Die hard user of the parking brake to help save that.

Severe conditions can go as far as 60K miles before replacing your fluid, only thing to check for is for leaks. Normal, add another 100K miles to that number.

New major problems with AT's, software in the ECU if corrupt will end up in major shifting problems, in particular if both forward and reverse clutches are energized at the same time. Others are in poor contacts, what use to be a simple neutral safety switch has many contacts for the different gears, road salt on the transmission connectors, also in ignition and the brake pedal.

Son was told he needed a new $4,000.00 transmission by crooked people when his only problem was dirty contqcts in his neutral safety switch, his dad took care of that in less than 30 minutes.

How you drive can do the most damage to your AT, wear increases by the square of the speed. Vss does have some brains so you can't shift into low gear at 90 mph, but with the earlier ones you could. Ha, can speed up your engine to 15,000 rpm.
 

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As per the service manual procedure , once you refill the transmission, it stats to get the transmission fluid upto a temp of 50-60 deg C. But this must not be full operating temp as I have a acutel ap200 with Hyundai data, and when I pull live data of the transmission control with the fluid temp , after I drive for about 10+ km ..the fluid temp settles around 90 deg C ..

Does anyone have a GDS or equivalent to recheck my data and the fluid temp ?

Thank all


Sent from my BBD100-2 using Tapatalk
 

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I changed the transmission fluid on my 2018 Hyundai Elantra at 30k miles. Fluid was Dark but still good. Removed most of the break-in materials. I did drain and fill procedures 3 times to get 80% new transmission fluid. Runs like butter now! Detailed video coming up in the next 2-3 weeks. Cheers! :)
 

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Not sure what the guy removed to fill but there's a different fill plug.
The Guy removed the correct fill plug only. From 2017 model onwards, the fill plug cannot be removed. The shiftier assembly/some part is blocking it. Maybe this is done purposely so that owners do not change the fluid. :censored:
 

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I wouldn't recommend even LOOKING at the transmission fluid, much less changing it, before 60K. If anything, 14K is when things are really getting sealed and settled in, so I wouldn't muck about with that.

Engine oil? Sure, make sure the first change is early if you want, not a big deal. I changed mine at 2K, thereabouts. Also, the trans fluid system has a filter. So you're not bouncing anything around at all.


Leave it alone (oh lord leave it alone!), or you're asking for trouble. Conventional automatic transmissions are considered "black magic" for a lot of reasons.
As per the service manual procedure , once you refill the transmission, it stats to get the transmission fluid upto a temp of 50-60 deg C. But this must not be full operating temp as I have a acutel ap200 with Hyundai data, and when I pull live data of the transmission control with the fluid temp , after I drive for about 10+ km ..the fluid temp settles around 90 deg C ..

Does anyone have a GDS or equivalent to recheck my data and the fluid temp ?

Thank all


Sent from my BBD100-2 using Tapatalk
The transmission on 2017-2019 Elantras are different. The fill plug does not have a gasket. Its completely plastic. But the procedures are the same.
 

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Doesn't the manual say the AT fluid is maintenance free unless you fall under severe conditions.
Do not believe
The Hyundai transmission fluid is synthetic and should theoretically last for 150,000 miles. However I use Amsoil ATF in my 2003 Hyundai Elantra GT with over 428,500+ miles on it and despite the so-called life of the vehicle transmission fluid claims I do a drain and fill of about 4.5 quarts which will drain out of the transmission about every 70,000 to 80,000 miles and I am still driving with the original never been rebuilt transmission. By the time 150,000 miles comes around the original transmission fluid will be pretty dark which means dirty and worn out. Too many wear particles inside the fluid will accelerate the wear of the transmission clutches and bands leading to slipping and sludge to form and unfortunately, these wear particles and sludge keep accumulating over the miles. The only way to keep wear under control is to drain the fluid and put fresh fluid in which will keep your transmission cleaner and running cooler. Here is a picture of my old transmission fluid that I take to a waste oil recycler. The fluid has over 80,000 miles yet it still has some redness color left in it. Some people's transmission fluid is actually black or dark brown when it is drained and that means damage is being done when the fluid is that bad. After driving it I made sure the fluid level was just below the hot mark on the transmission dipstick. Do not overfill since it could damage the transmission
Absolutely my friend. You are indeed correct. If someone is using OEM, drain/fill every 30k miles and the tranny will last 200+ miles easily. If you use a superior product like Amsoil, then drain/fill every 60k miles, you are good! This is preventive maintenance and keeping the fluids clean inside is the key to a healthy transmission.:)
 

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Has anyone changed the ATF in a 2017 or 2018 Elantra? If so, is it pretty straight forward? Have any tips to make things easier? I have about 14,000 miles on the car and want to get out the metal shavings of the initial break-in.

I know it's a 24mm (or 15/16) for the drain plug. However, as for the fill plug, this youtube video makes it appear that the process can be rather difficult--he actually had to drill a small notch in the plug in order to remove it.


Has anyone found an easier way to get around that part that is in the way that prevents the fill plug from being easily removed?
Hi Everyone!

My video is out. I have tried to be as detailed as possible utilizing less amount of time.

Please let me know if you have any questions! :)

The Video
 
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