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Has anyone changed the ATF in a 2017 or 2018 Elantra? If so, is it pretty straight forward? Have any tips to make things easier? I have about 14,000 miles on the car and want to get out the metal shavings of the initial break-in.

I know it's a 24mm (or 15/16) for the drain plug. However, as for the fill plug, this youtube video makes it appear that the process can be rather difficult--he actually had to drill a small notch in the plug in order to remove it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Um5NJwNZlgI

Has anyone found an easier way to get around that part that is in the way that prevents the fill plug from being easily removed?
Doesn't the manual say the AT fluid is maintenance free unless you fall under severe conditions.
 

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Doesn't the manual say the AT fluid is maintenance free unless you fall under severe conditions.
The Hyundai transmission fluid is synthetic and should theoretically last for 150,000 miles. However I use Amsoil ATF in my 2003 Hyundai Elantra GT with over 428,500+ miles on it and despite the so-called life of the vehicle transmission fluid claims I do a drain and fill of about 4.5 quarts which will drain out of the transmission about every 70,000 to 80,000 miles and I am still driving with the original never been rebuilt transmission. By the time 150,000 miles comes around the original transmission fluid will be pretty dark which means dirty and worn out. Too many wear particles inside the fluid will accelerate the wear of the transmission clutches and bands leading to slipping and sludge to form and unfortunately, these wear particles and sludge keep accumulating over the miles. The only way to keep wear under control is to drain the fluid and put fresh fluid in which will keep your transmission cleaner and running cooler. Here is a picture of my old transmission fluid that I take to a waste oil recycler. The fluid has over 80,000 miles yet it still has some redness color left in it. Some people's transmission fluid is actually black or dark brown when it is drained and that means damage is being done when the fluid is that bad. After driving it I made sure the fluid level was just below the hot mark on the transmission dipstick. Do not overfill since it could damage the transmission
 

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That grass trimmer and other tools shown in the pic came out of your transmission ? I'd be changing it frequently as well .

Fluid looks about same as mine was at 72k , transmissions have improved quite a bit with respect to precision machining as well as electronic controls help to minimize wear from clutch engagement and so on, normal driving should get one to 60k on the ATF and lot of highway miles much further. YMMV

The elimination of the dipstick does make check the condition of the fluid more difficult though.
 

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That grass trimmer and other tools shown in the pic came out of your transmission ? I'd be changing it frequently as well .

Fluid looks about same as mine was at 72k , transmissions have improved quite a bit with respect to precision machining as well as electronic controls help to minimize wear from clutch engagement and so on, normal driving should get one to 60k on the ATF and lot of highway miles much further. YMMV

The elimination of the dipstick does make check the condition of the fluid more difficult though.
Yes, On my wife's 2013 Ford Escape Titanium, there is no dipstick either only a red fluid cap on the top of the transmission near where the air filter box is. You actually have to remove the air box to get at it. Pain in the butt compared to the 2003 Elantra easy access with a long funnel. Yes the fluid came out easily and the drain plug had very little on it and it was just an easy clean with a paper towel. Sludge inside your transmission will turn the fluid black because ATF is a great cleaning agent like a detergent and dissolves sludge and suspends it inside the fluid which causes it to look black and sometimes cloudy. My fluid was still clear albeit a touch more tan colored than pristine fluid as seen by the picture and the lack of cloudiness shows in the picture by having the mirror-like image of the tools on the wall shows it is fairly clean.
LOL No grass trimmer in my fluid. The condition of the fluid in my transmission with 428,500+ miles is pretty well good as you can expect so hopefully I will make 500,000 miles on this car. here is a picture of the car and you can see that I take good care of it. I am a maintenance guy and I have driven lots of cars well north of 200,000 miles.
 

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yeah - I posted the color chart in another thread - my fluid color was roughly between maroon and brown, pretty normal . The Sante Fe turbo does have a larger transmission cooler mounted alongside the radiator which may help with ATF life - and agree 100% on your explanation of fluid holding fine particles , which at some point will cause accelerated component wear but that's when the fluid starts looking blackish and becomes thicker owing to the buildup.

The precision machining of the internal components is quite impressive on the modern trannies, I was impressed at the completle integrity of all the mating surfaces, seal and joints when under the car - absolutely no sigh of any seeps from both engine and tranny.
 

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yeah - I posted the color chart in another thread - my fluid color was roughly between maroon and brown, pretty normal . The Sante Fe turbo does have a larger transmission cooler mounted alongside the radiator which may help with ATF life - and agree 100% on your explanation of fluid holding fine particles , which at some point will cause accelerated component wear but that's when the fluid starts looking blackish and becomes thicker owing to the buildup.

The precision machining of the internal components is quite impressive on the modern trannies, I was impressed at the completle integrity of all the mating surfaces, seal and joints when under the car - absolutely no sigh of any seeps from both engine and tranny.
As you can see on the side of the container my fluid is fairly red with a touch of tan so that means wear at 428,500 miles is under control. Right now it is mostly red since you can only drain about 1/2 of the fluid out of the transmission. I can't believe people let their transmission fluid get black? I heard that it stinks too when it is black and is gritty or slimy with sludge too. Transmission fluid can be a bit discolored but it should never be cloudy which means suspended sludge. At my last Timing belt change, the technician guy said my transmission still shifts like a new car and at the time the car had 380,000 miles on it. I told the person that I use Amsoil ATF in the car and one of the technicians, not the guy who asked me had the nerve to say that "You will void your warranty if you use a Non-Hyundai transmission fluid" The guy who commented on how well the transmission worked said he must be doing something right since his transmission is original and still operates well. I have used Amsoil products since 1988 and I have lots of old power equipment such as boats and snowmobiles and cars and lawnmowers that still runs great. When I last had it in for a timing belt change I had a few people from the dealership come into the service area and look at my car that has almost 400,000 miles on it. I heard a lady who drove 1 million miles on her Elantra was given a brand new car. Maybe if the body lasts long enough. Pretty hard to do in Minnesota since rust has killed every one of my cars before any major mechanical problems arise that mean new car like engine or transmission goes bad. PS Right now I drive a Toyota Prius five and the Hyundai Elantra belongs to my son.
 

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There have been more improvements in engine oil than tranny fluid over the last couple of decades and I don't see us doing oil changes once a lifetime.
On my last car I used a transmission fluid rated for 300k in an Allison transmission. I am not seeing anyone use their engine oil for 300k.

Should you change your transmission fluid at 15k, 60k, or never? The answer is "yes". ;)
 

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On my last car I used a transmission fluid rated for 300k in an Allison transmission. I am not seeing anyone use their engine oil for 300k.

Should you change your transmission fluid at 15k, 60k, or never? The answer is "yes". ;)
As to never, that would not be a good answer. 15,000 miles too soon. 60,000 miles just right. My 428,500+ mile Hyundai Elantra Gt which still has the original transmission and original engine is proof that regular ATF drain and fills help to increase the life of the transmission
 

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...At my last Timing belt change, the technician guy said my transmission still shifts like a new car and at the time the car had 380,000 miles on it. I told the person that I use Amsoil ATF in the car and one of the technicians, not the guy who asked me had the nerve to say that "You will void your warranty if you use a Non-Hyundai transmission fluid" ...
Did you point out that at 380,000 miles you were no longer worried about voiding your warranty? :)
 

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...I am not seeing anyone use their engine oil for 300k...
Engine oil and transmission fluid do very different jobs, so a comparison mile for mile is really apples and oranges. But some people do go 15,000 miles between oil changes. On my 2000 BMW, that was the recommended interval, unless the oil change indicator came on. I think that's too long, but what do I know? I'm not an automotive engineer or a motor oil expert.
 

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My only comment as to ATF lasting 300k miles - if I paid the absurd price that SPM costs at Hyundai dealers running it to 300k would be the only way for me to justify that price. Instead I'll use Valvoline Maxlife and change it at reasonable intervals.
 

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My only comment as to ATF lasting 300k miles - if I paid the absurd price that SPM costs at Hyundai dealers running it to 300k would be the only way for me to justify that price. Instead I'll use Valvoline Maxlife and change it at reasonable intervals.
The Torque-Drive was $40 per gallon from Amsoil. To me it was worth it. I think car ownership is a personal thing. Whatever you want to do is all right by me.
 

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The Torque-Drive was $40 per gallon from Amsoil. To me it was worth it. I think car ownership is a personal thing. Whatever you want to do is all right by me.
No argument here. We have a kid around the block with his first car. About a $600 beater with a sound system. He washes and waxes it nearly everyday. To him? It’s the coolest thing, ever.

What he doesn’t realize due to his tender teenage years is this: he is molding himself into a person that will grow more mature with good auto responsibilities. In a few years? Who knows? He may be as OCD with his new ride as we are with ours. I don’t think I’ll find anyone on here that will argue with that statement. Not as anal as all of us are. LOL
 

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Did you point out that at 380,000 miles you were no longer worried about voiding your warranty? :)
I did, But what I really liked is that the other technician said that he must be doing something right to get 380,000 miles out of the original transmission. :smile: My sister's late husband was a service manager and he didn't believe that Amsoil was any good either. I showed him the mileage of my car which had about 350,000 miles on it at the time and he said you got lucky to have an engine run that long and oil is oil. With Amsoil people have driven their vehicles to 1 million miles on the original engine. Back several years ago I replaced the valve cover gasket and the inside of my engine was completely clean with no sludge at all in it. You could even read the numbers stamped on the parts. Even with the Hyundai transmission fluid if you do a drain and fill every 60,000 or so miles you should get well over 200,000 miles on the transmission. Amsoil did a test on taxicabs with 180,000 miles with Amsoil ATF and then tore down the transmissions and found that there was no significant wear on the bands and clutches of the automatic transmission even though it had been driven for 180,000 miles. Maintenance is what keeps your vehicle roadworthy and I believe $60 of transmission fluid and some of my time is worth it if I can prevent transmission failure. If the fluid is discolored it means it is holding contaminants and these contaminants act like an abrasive and that is why it is so important to remove the dirty fluid and put in clean. Here is my odometer reading from tonight. 428,669 miles with the original engine and original transmission.
 

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GustoGuy, that is cool. My last car had 272k on original transmission. Spin on filter, drain plug, and dipstick. Changing transmission fluid not much harder than changing the oil. Hyundai's set-up is intimidating to me. Like to hear the high mileage motor stories and maintenance success stories.
 

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My last car had 272k on original transmission. Spin on filter, drain plug, and dipstick. Changing transmission fluid not much harder than changing the oil.
Saturn? My '95 was, buy far, the easiest and cheapest to maintain...if you're satisfied with basic transportation!
 

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Saturn? My '95 was, buy far, the easiest and cheapest to maintain...if you're satisfied with basic transportation!
Yes. I had a 99 SL2 fully loaded. In my mind not basic transportation but I started out with a Pinto. A member Luke at Saturnfans took his 95 SL2 to 650k and averaged over 41 mpg.
 

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Yes. I had a 99 SL2 fully loaded. In my mind not basic transportation but I started out with a Pinto. A member Luke at Saturnfans took his 95 SL2 to 650k and averaged over 41 mpg.
Mine was '95 SL2 A/T and got about 35 when I got it, and about 30mpg when I sold it last year. It was rusting to he11 or I would have kept it.
 

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...must be doing something right to get 380,000 miles out of the original transmission. :smile: My sister's late husband was a service manager and he didn't believe that Amsoil was any good either. ...With Amsoil people have driven their vehicles to 1 million miles on the original engine. ...Amsoil did a test on taxicabs with 180,000 miles with Amsoil ATF and then tore down the transmissions and found that there was no significant wear ... Maintenance is what keeps your vehicle roadworthy ...
It is clear you are a fan of Amsoil. I am sure we could hear similar stories from others who have used other products. The key here is that you are paying attention to the maintenance, and going above and beyond manufacturers' minimum requirements, and for that I salute you.
 

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It is clear you are a fan of Amsoil. I am sure we could hear similar stories from others who have used other products. The key here is that you are paying attention to the maintenance, and going above and beyond manufacturers' minimum requirements, and for that I salute you.
In fact, if you use any halfway decent synthetic oil and a great oil filter and change at 10,000 miles or less you will have good results. A good synthetic will not form sludge like a conventional oil will. As to dino oil. I never use it anymore. I have seen engine tear downs first hand on Amsoil and very little wear on engine parts despite some crazy high mileage. I have a snowmobile 1996 Polaris XLT touring sled. They were known for crank bearings going out especially if modified. Back in 2010 I was riding with my wife and the sled stalled. I started it up again and immediately noticed a slight grinding noise and I diagnosed it as a crank bearing. I was able to limp it home very slowly at about 10 to 15mph and put it on the trailer. I brought it to a snowmobile shop and told them what happened. Since the snowmobile had 7300 miles on it at the time they told me that not only will the crank need to be rebuilt that they would most likely need new pistons and an overbore. Well, 3 days later I get a call from the shop. They said they ran the calipers up and down all 3 cylinders twice and the bore was still within specs. The guy at the shop said you could still see the factory done crosshatch on the cylinder walls. He asked me what oil I was using and I told him Amsoil Interceptor. He said I saved a ton of money over $350 since it only needed a ball hone and new piston rings instead of 3 new pistons and did not to be taken to a machine shop to have the cylinders bored over. I still own the sled and it has about 9800 miles on it now. It is the black and purple one in the photo on the right with my son. The other sled red and black one is an absolute rocket it is a 2002 XCSP 600 with VES.
 

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