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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have manual shift and the clutch is worn out. when in motion if I press the pedal the rpms jump but the car does not accelerate. only way to accelerate is to press very gently.

Q: do I always need to change the flywheel, which is expensive or changing just the clutch will do??

thanks everybody.
 

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I recently changed the clutch for my granddaughter's 2003 Elantra. It was a moderate pain to do but managed.

No you don't necessarily need to change the flywheel. As long as it is not horribly worn you can just leave it alone. I did snake my right angle die grinder up in between the bell housing and the flywheel with an abrasive disc on it and took the glaze off the flywheel. Works fine now, spins the tires with gusto!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
more detail

can you refer me to more detail on the procedure? instructions with pics would be great if available.
thank you.
 

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I did it in my brother's shop. He has been a professional wrench for 50 years so that helped a lot with tools and techniques. This is about an 800 dollar job according to the flat rate manual. I could have bought a clutch from rockauto.com but chose to buy one from a local parts house that has a machine shop and they would include a discount on machining the flywheel if needed.

I did a lot of my homework by finding videos on youtube.com that cover the clutch job pretty completely. What I did differently was I did not remove the transmission from the car.

The car was jacked up really high on stands on both ends. I used some 2x4's and blocks to support the engine so I could remove the front and rear engine mounts. Likewise, after pulling the transmission, I shoved it as far to the driver side as possible for clearance to remove the pressure plate.

I unbolted the brake calipers and hooked them to the springs with some doubled up bungee cords (left the brake lines intact.)

Took the nuts off the spindles and pulled the half shafts with a big jerk, have to turn the steering to pull the splined end out of the strut/spindle end afterwards.

Most all of it is covered in detail in the youtube videos from some pro shop.
 

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Thats interesting w2zero; so you found you had enough room to do the job without disconnecting the power steering, dropping the sub-frame and completely removing the gearbox? That would make it a much easier task. How did you align the new pressure plate without much clearance?
Ref. the abrasive disc; should that be coarse or fine abrasive and how long did you do this for or is it just until the surface is dull and no longer shiny?

I replaced the clutch in my J2 Lantra (UK model). It is easier to do than the J3 but still took a while. I didn't touch the flywheel. Still good two years later.
 

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You shouldn't need a new flywheel, but resurfacing would be recommended since you got that far.
+1 Agree with the resurfacing. You're already in there. Otherwise you could get what's sometimes commonly referred to as "juddering" when the new disc engages the old flywheel's surface. Akin to a "hopping or jumping" sensation as the pedal is released and the disc engages.

I've done both. All based on the appearance and feel of the flywheel. If it look scored or scratched (think ignored brake rotor when the disc pads have grooved it), resurfacing or replacement is the answer. Resurfacing is the least expensive route. It is the proven method to prevent any possibility of future problems. The last thing you want to do is go back in there to have it resurfaced. Or pay someone else to do what should have been done the first time.

"There's never enough time to do it correctly first, but always time to re-do it."
 

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Not badly glazed and no evidence of surface imperfections. The rivets had not made any contact with the surface, just a worn down friction that didn't do the job any more.

I had to rotate the flywheel to reach each pair of bolts on the pressure plate and likewise to upset the flywheel friction surface with the die grinder/sanding disc. Space was very tight, but room for my hands which aren't small by any measure.

I am familiar with resurfacing friction surfaces when they need it from the days of rock crusher mopars and toploaders behind some serious hp. The clutch works smoothly and doesn't grab judder shudder or anything else. That's why I inspected with a light and a mirror before continuing. Had the receipt for the clutch kit in my pocket should it need to be turned by the parts house.

Ed Gasket: I removed the whole air cleaner box mess just like in the Chilton manual and then pulled the transmission to the left front and a bit up with some slight rotation and that was enough clearance. The front of the trans was a little closer to the engine than the rear but I still had room for the clutch kit and the alignment tool. Much rotation of the flywheel and aligning the disc by feel while tightening the bolts incrementially and checking that the alignment stub would slide in and out easily. It is so much easier these days with that plastic tool. The bad old days sucked in that respect when it was mostly align the disc by feel and then have someone work the clutch while stabbing the transmission.

Now that the granddaughter's car is fixed I can concentrate on tweaking the valve body in the Fairlane to complete that transmission repair.
 

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I've seen those stubby alignment tools in US Youtube videos; some come as part of the clutch kit don't they?. Don't seem to get them in the UK; only the older style long ones that pretty much need the gearbox out of the way to use.
 

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Ed.

I shortened the tool on both ends since the clearance just wasn't there for all the crank pilot or the ring end of the tool.

Clutch pilot tool not included in the UK kits? That is just wrong of the distributors to do that! My kit was a plain brown box labeled as Korea or China or one of several other Asian manufacturers then had another box with all the shiny pretty adverts and language of destination on it.
 

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Ed, do they do that just because someone thinks you wish a challenge? As if lying on the floor thrashing about weren't enough.

In my dissipated youth, we either had an input shaft in the tool box or had a friend with one. Otherwise it was a toss of the dice and align by feel around the outside of the pressure plate.
 

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Piece of old bar stock and a lathe work wonder.. Hyundai has an align tool, see if dealer let you measure. There is a vendor that sell injection molded plastic dummy shafts, I bought one from local "clutch & joint" place..

I have 1 I made for Toyota FWD back in the day, small on 1 end (Corolla/Echo and similar), large on other end for the Camry/Celica
 
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