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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey guys, ive been helping my sister in law with her car. i came on here before looking for help and you guys solved the issue like instantly!!

now this whole time i have been telling them its not the battery or alternator because if her husband is not home she cant get jumped, so she waits alittle while and the car will jump (while waiting the sun now is up and it is warmer out..)

my new question is this.. she baught a new battery last year exactly the same month because the car needed a jump every morning..

well acouple weeks ago same thing, needed a jump, at this time the weather has been in the low teens... so they went to the place i told them to get the battery (interstate only batteries i use) he gave them a new battery, it was good for 3 weeks

this morning (-2 below) the car wont start... they jump the car and go right to the battery store ( ironically 3-4 houses down the street is the battery store) the guy puts the machines on the car, and the battery and alternator check out fine ( like ive said the whole time...)

so i finally convinced them its the power wire that goes from the battery down to the starter... with the fords the starts are low and the water and elements can touch it, the power wire turns green and corrodes to the point where there is no contact, change the power wire and your good!

now the question, im curious where i can find a factory power wire that goes to the starter?
 

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The normal Hyundai scenario is for the ground wire to become shorted where is bolts to the body, not a corroded positive battery cable. In rust belt states like MA. The solution is to remove the ground wires, clean up around the body, maybe put some dielectric grease, etc.
 

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If you know how long it is you can get generic cables of various lengths at about any auto parts store/department.

Run a ground wire from where the battery mounts to the body to the engine block too. That should solve any future ground wire problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The normal Hyundai scenario is for the ground wire to become shorted where is bolts to the body, not a corroded positive battery cable. In rust belt states like MA. The solution is to remove the ground wires, clean up around the body, maybe put some dielectric grease, etc.
If you know how long it is you can get generic cables of various lengths at about any auto parts store/department.

Run a ground wire from where the battery mounts to the body to the engine block too. That should solve any future ground wire problems.
guys thanks!! i did a quick "ground search" and wow! there is allot of issues with the grounds

im going to take apart and clean her ground to the body tomorrow, and while there take a measurement so i can make a cable to reach the motor

as for the engine block where is the best location to bolt the new ground to?
 

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Any location that will expose the ground lug to a good metal surface is fine. Not familiar with the Accent's engine bay arrangements, but anywhere you can get that wire securely connected should do the trick. And if you can get a small tube of "dielectric grease" (as jsinton said) to put on the connections, that will go a long way to ensuring good contact while preventing corrosion.
 

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The normal Hyundai scenario is for the ground wire to become shorted where is bolts to the body, not a corroded positive battery cable. In rust belt states like MA. The solution is to remove the ground wires, clean up around the body, maybe put some dielectric grease, etc.
Personally for ground conductivity, I like to use Anti-Sieze Compound, preferably the copper type.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Any location that will expose the ground lug to a good metal surface is fine. Not familiar with the Accent's engine bay arrangements, but anywhere you can get that wire securely connected should do the trick. And if you can get a small tube of "dielectric grease" (as jsinton said) to put on the connections, that will go a long way to ensuring good contact while preventing corrosion.
thank you, im going to check it out tomorrow, ive been reading threw back threads.. wow is there allot of battery cable issues....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Personally for ground conductivity, I like to use Anti-Sieze Compound, preferably the copper type.
thats the first time i ever heard that?! i love anti-sieze, but never known it to be a dielectric ?

i do have tubes of dielectric grease, and anti-seize, silver and copper

i really appreciate the help guys! ill keep u posted on my issue, hopefully its something stupid simple like cables

danny
 

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thats the first time i ever heard that?! i love anti-sieze, but never known it to be a dielectric ?

i do have tubes of dielectric grease, and anti-seize, silver and copper

i really appreciate the help guys! ill keep u posted on my issue, hopefully its something stupid simple like cables

danny
For electrical boots and plugs I like to use dielectric grease. It's just for the grounding connection, I feel the anti-sieze is good conductor and yet seals the area against corrosion. Since you got it, I'd go with the copper.
 

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For electrical boots and plugs I like to use dielectric grease. It's just for the grounding connection, I feel the anti-sieze is good conductor and yet seals the area against corrosion. Since you got it, I'd go with the copper.
Copper makes good practical sense. After all, what are the electrical wires and cables primarily constructed from? Copper! Exactly! Great point.
 

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Using a heavier gauge (numerically lower) will always help. Hyundai seems to cheap out here. If it has a 6 or 8 gauge, use a 2 or 4 gauge. Check for full copper strands - not aluminum or copper plated. A few $$ more here is money well spent.

This is one place where aftermarket beats factory OEM big time.............. and it will cost less.
 

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In the past and on my Gen Coupe i will make up a bunch of small 14ga wires and loop all the grounds together. You still need the big ground going to the engine block from the body/battery ground.
 

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In the past and on my Gen Coupe i will make up a bunch of small 14ga wires and loop all the grounds together. You still need the big ground going to the engine block from the body/battery ground.
Interesting idea, Red. Did you braid them or use electrical tape to wrap them together? Or maybe enclose inside a wire loom? I have some left over wire loom in the garage from the rear deflector mod. Might look good under the hood on some custom grounding cables.
 

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I usually will wire tie them to existing wires. Or if it is exposed to heat I will use some heat rated 1/4" wire loom.

You should buy good crimp connectors, make sure the actual connectors are brass or copper with tin or other anti corrosive plating and not steel with plating. Also good crimpers and you may want to get some heat shrink tubing to cover the area where the connector and wire insulation meet. This is the weakest point of the wire and the copper will be exposed somewhat and prone to breaking the tiny strands.

You can also get some of that friction tape the OEMs use to wrap the wires if you want. But only being a single wire there is no harm to leaving it exposed as it is just a ground.
 

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Totally with you on the importance of the ground lug connector. My son has a butane soldering iron which makes quick work of connecting the copper strands to the lug. I have a great set of crimpers. For larger lugs, I'll turn the lug over so the split portion is facing down on a piece of wood. Using a hammer, I'll make a large crimp in the back side with the tip of a flat blade screwdriver. Then, the soldering.

Not trying to sound arrogant, but I have always felt there were some items on a vehicle that were installed at the factory which I could improve upon. And I'm not alone in this belief. This forum is full of great ideas from everyday guys and gals. Most of which are way smarter than me. LOL

I know their processes are cost-related and quality tested. What's wrong with taking their 14 or 16awg ground wire and replacing it with an 8awg? Or 6? Absolutely nothing. Besides, I'm only doing this on ONE car, not hundreds of thousands. Cost to me in a non-issue. And it makes me feel all warm and fuzzy when the mod is completed. Did someone just say, "Peace of mind?"
 

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I can't afford all the copper to be using 8ga :)

I do use #4 or #3 for the main ground. Usually match what the factory uses. But when daisy chaining all the smaller wires it is just a preventive measure to ensure a good ground NOT through the body. So whatever size wire you are connecting to is what you need. Nothing wrong with going bigger other than weight and cost.

Here's another idea though not so much for the KIA/Hyundai cars that use the body for ground.
 

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